Chief Justice Roberts was wrong. He misconstrued census data in voting rights argument.

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Photograph: Jason Reed/Reuters

Photograph: Jason Reed/Reuters

Dear Chief Justice Roberts,

If you base your arguments on misconstrued data, then your argument is faulty at best and without merit at worst.

If your final judgment of a case is based on your own worthless arguments, then you are erroneously and egregiously changing and affecting lives and law, not to mention disenfranchising voters and altering election outcomes.

Oh, and your credibility goes down the toidy.

Sincerely,

Americans who care about democracy

NPR:

At the voting rights argument in the Supreme Court on Wednesday, Chief Justice John Roberts tore into Solicitor General Donald Verrilli, grilling him on his knowledge of voting statistics.

The point the chief justice was trying to make was that Massachusetts, which is not covered by the preclearance section of the Voting Rights Act, has a far worse record in black voter registration and turnout than Mississippi, which is covered by Section 5 of the act.

But a close look at census statistics indicates the chief justice was wrong, or at least that he did not look at the totality of the numbers.

oopsie cat

He also “mangled the wording” of presidential oath in 2009, but who's counting?

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  • labman57

    Some social conservatives and tea party fanatics would love to return to the days of yesteryear when Jim Crow laws were SOP, and political intimidation of voters at election precincts was frowned upon, yet widely tolerated ... and some justices on the SCOTUS appear to be all too eager to accommodate this quest for social devolution.