Harry Reid seeks to limit filibuster in next Senate

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

fil·i·bus·ter/ˈfiləˌbəstər/

Noun:
An action such as a prolonged speech that obstructs progress in a legislative assembly while not technically contravening the required...
Verb:
Act in an obstructive manner in a legislature, esp. by speaking at inordinate length.

Harry Reid is as tired as many of us are of the Republicans' abuse of the filibuster. Now 60 votes has become a recent Senate "requirement" in order to enter and exit the amendment and debate process. Without that, a majority could pass legislation, as used to be the norm. But the GOP has threatened to block time and time again, and without a consistent caucus of 60 votes to overcome that, legislation can't get through.

In fact, the GOP has been the party of obstruction ever since inauguration night. Could be because working together isn't high on Mitch McConnell's agenda… and never was.

And so this is what we ended up with:

Something has to change, and Reid may be the person who finally does something about it.

Via The Hill:

Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) said Wednesday he will push rules changes to limit Republicans’ ability to filibuster proceedings in the next session of Congress.

To do so, Reid most likely will have to employ a controversial tactic known as the "Constitutional" or nuclear option. Under this scenario, Senate Democrats could change chamber rules by a simple majority vote. [...]

Reid said he will not end the Senate filibuster, which gives the minority party the ability to block legislation with 41 votes. Instead, he will curb its practice, most likely by shielding motions to proceed to new business from dilatory tactics.

We have so much to do. Imagine what could have been accomplished had the Dems not been blocked at every turn.

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare
  • DarkMagess

    Why not just have a rule about the number of times it can be used per session? Then they'd have to save it for the important stuff, like they used to.