Cancer Strikes ACA Critic Day After Publicly Denouncing Pre-Existing Conditions Mandate

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Ralph Hudgens

Ignorance isn't covered under the Affordable Care Act as a pre-existing condition. Perhaps it should have been. You're about to see why.

In Georgia, the Peach State, they have a Republican State Insurance commissioner named Ralph Hudgens. One could make a pretty good argument that he would have a working knowledge of insurance, what it is and how it works. Now that's an assumption but I think we can grant that much. We're not edging out too far on a limb.

So when he tackles an insurance issue in his state, there's reason for the people of his state to listen. Or so you'd think. Back in August, he told people in his state that he would do everything in his power to be an obstructionist to the upcoming Affordable Care Act.

Earlier this week Commissioner Hudges took to the dais and told the audience that he was firmly against Obamacare. His main target was pre-existing conditions and why he felt that forcing insurance companies to provide coverage to those so afflicted was wrong. In his analogy, it's like calling a car insurance company the day after you've been in a car accident that WAS YOUR FAULT and asking for collision coverage. A purchase after the fact. So in essence, he's equating a pre-existing condition to being your fault.

Hopefully Karma is covered under his current plan. This week, after speaking out against Obamacare and it's pre-existing coverage, he was diagnosed as having prostate cancer. I'm not wallowing in that, by any means. It's terrible and I hope he can be treated and live a long life, though politically, I'm hoping he's not as lucky. Maybe he should consider this. Without the ACA going into effect January 1, 2014, his coverage would very likely be dropped and no other company would pick him up -- because of a pre-existing condition.

HuffPo:

Hudgens was forced to swallow his words Wednesday after the Georgia Democratic Party circulated footage of him comparing pre-existing conditions to at-fault car wrecks. Making the case against Obamacare's requirement that insurers accept those with pre-existing conditions, Hudgens suggested that such conditions were the fault of those who have them, in the way a car accident is the driver's fault.

Now prostate cancer, to the best of my knowledge isn't the victim's fault unlike his car accident analogy. Now perhaps he'll temper his public displeasure with the healthcare law, maybe even come to embrace it, because Obamacare could be all that separates him from financial devastation.

This is the problem with the Republican unified opposition to the ACA. They just don't know what they're talking about. It's trying to fight a law that helps, not hurts so many. Illness or discovery of a condition can come at any time, at any place and at any age, to anyone.

Republicans are currently targeting young people, "the invincibles" as they are called, and telling them they don't need insurance. They're being encouraged to break the law and not sign up. That's wrong. Tragedy doesn't have a calendar or timeline. It doesn't have a calendar you can look at in advance. So, you carry insurance, just in case your number gets called, like Ralph Hudgens.

Just watch Commissioner Hudgens the day before he got his health news -- he's laughing and making fun with a horrible analogy between a car accident and Obamacare. I bet he's not laughing so hard now.

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