Archive for sun

Overnight: Yucatan, Mexico

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Yucatan Mexico Rain Dance

Yucatan Mexico Rain Dance

Two travelers whom I knew in California, a Swedish woman, a New Zealand man, traveled to Mexico for several months and spent much of their time on the Yucatan Peninsula. When they returned, they could not stop talking about it. Their travel budgets were tight, their respective currencies not doing well against the dollar, and they'd heard they could travel inexpensively.

That they did, but that's not what they wanted to talk about but, instead, how nice the people were, how beautiful it was, and that they felt for the first time as if they were really on vacation! I'd love to make it there myself sometime but the next best thing is a YouTube video. Enjoy!

Oh, where's the Yucatan and what's there? ¡Aqui esta!

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Overnight: San Miguel de Allende, Mexico

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San Miguel de Allende, Mexico

San Miguel de Allende, Mexico

Somday, when I have time, I hope to travel through Mexico more extensively than I have heretofore - 2 long trips through Baja California, several short visits to border towns.  One of my destinations on that trip will be San Miguel de Allende, an artists' town.  Here's more about it: San Miguel de Allende. Here are pictures of it on Google Images. I have a friend who took early retirement to live there. Apparently prices are reasonable and 'the livin' is easy'.  Sounds good to me.  ¡Viva Mexico!

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Astronomy Overnight Thread- Strawberry Sun

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LH8051_RimFireSmokeySun

Strawberry Sun
Image Credit & Copyright: Laurie Hatch
Explanation: This striking, otherworldy scene really is a view from planet Earth. The ochre sky and strawberry red sun were photographed on August 22nd near the small village of Strawberry, California, USA. Found along Highway 108, that location is about 30 miles north of the origin of California's large Rim Fire, still threatening areas in and around Yosemite National Park. The extensive smoke plumes from the wildfire are easily visible from space. But seen from within the plumes, the fine smoke particles suspended in the atmosphere dim the Sun, scattering blue light and strongly coloring the sky.

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Video Astronomy Overnight Thread- Total solar eclipse delights Australians

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Video Mid Day Distraction- Massive solar flare unleashed

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Via.

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Astronomy Video Overnight Thread- Solar eruption captured by Nasa

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You can read more about this coolio eruption here.

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Astronomy Overnight Thread- Transit of Venus, 2004

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A Picturesque Venus Transit
Image Credit & Copyright: David Cortner

Explanation: The rare transit of Venus across the face of the Sun in 2004 was one of the better-photographed events in sky history. Both scientific and artistic images flooded in from the areas that could see the transit: Europe and much of Asia, Africa, and North America. Scientifically, solar photographers confirmed that the black drop effect is really better related to the viewing clarity of the camera or telescope than the atmosphere of Venus. Artistically, images might be divided into several categories. One type captures the transit in front of a highly detailed Sun. Another category captures a double coincidence such as both Venus and an airplane simultaneously silhouetted, or Venus and the International Space Station in low Earth orbit. A third image type involves a fortuitous arrangement of interesting looking clouds, as shown by example in the above image taken from North Carolina, USA. Sky enthusiasts worldwide are abuzz about the coming transit of Venus on Tuesday.

Click to enlarge.

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