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The Book Booth: Fall Edition

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The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. @SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore here, as well as a brick and mortar storefront mini-store in Hoquiam, WA at 706 Simpson Ave (Route 101 South). Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

The Book Booth: Fall Edition

The Fall equinox is upon us, and our journey into winter begins this coming Wednesday, the 23rd. All the signs are here in our little town. The leaves are turning and falling from the trees; the rain is beginning to return and stores have their Halloween displays up. And you can now purchase your Halloween cards for everyone on your list.

The Fall brings into Award Season, as well. The Nobel Prizes will be announced in early October. And the Booker Man Award for fiction will be presented on October 13th. This prize, once open only to Brits and writers in the Commonwealth, is now pretty much open to any novel written in English. And among this years shortlisted nominees is Anne Tyler for her novel Spool of Blue Thread. You can see the nominations here:
Booker Man Award Nominations

And the BBC provides also a guide to the books here. H/T to Lucian for providing this link.
BBC Guide to Booker Man Award Nominations

The long-lists for the National Book Awards, which are scheduled for November 18th, have also been announced and can be viewed here:
National Book Awards

The winner for this years PEN Literary Awards have already been announced this past week, and the ceremony for the honorees will be held in Beverly Hills on November 16th. The LA Times has the winners and other details here.
PEN Literary Awards

With the coming of Fall, also comes the opening of the football season. Quirk Books wondered what some novels would have looked like had they been written as tie-ins for some NFL teams.
NFL Teams Reimagined Novels

And October will bring us the baseball playoffs as well as the World Series. The folks at the Society for Baseball Research (or, more simply, SABR) had these recommendations for baseball reading. It is a pretty long list, but has a lot of good things for the baseball fan. That would be me.
Baseball Reading

Speaking of long lists, Publishers Weekly thought that the best books for the Fall Season were released this past September 14th. Here they provide the titles with descriptions, and it does look to be a good year for some good books.
Best Books for the Fall

Even authors like to take breaks from the tyranny of the blank page, and turn on the TeeVee machine. Flavorwire featured some writers favorite programs here. I am with Stephen King and his choice of The Americans. Good show! And, of course, The Wire is excellent.
What TV Programs Do Writers Watch?

Ever wonder what it would have been like to have culture icon George Carlin as a parent? Wonder no longer. His daughter Kelly Carlin provides the answer in her new memoir, A Carlin Home Companion. I don't think it would have been easy.
George Carlin As A Parent

I don't think I'd have been comfortable living in a hobbit hole, being a fairly tall man. But Dan Pauley has found some storybook homes that look delightful and pleasing to the eye. Via Boing Boing.
Storybook Homes

And I suppose Halloween will be upon us soon enough. If you know or have some naughty children, you may want to check out these scary Swedish stories. We know that the nights are long in Scandinavia, and these people have the time to get you very, very frightened. Again, via Boing Boing.
Scary Swedish Stories

Have a good weekend, filled with books and by all means, let us know what books you are treasuring.

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The Book Booth: Back To School Edition

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The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. @SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore here, as well as a brick and mortar storefront mini-store in Hoquiam, WA at 706 Simpson Ave (Route 101 South). Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

The Book Booth: Back to School Edition

Yes, school is back! As I type, I can see all those kids, ages 5 to 18, backpacks laden with books, heading on home for the day. (I don't see them leave for school, because who gets up that early when you don't have to?). My best wishes to all the students and may you have successful academic years.

For the fashion-minded English major who really wants to show off his or her literary cred, Litographs has this cool selection of t-shirts.
Literary T-Shirts

Or if none of those please, take a look at the stylings from Bustle.
And More Literary T-Shirts!

The James Bond franchise keeps chugging along. The British novelist Anthony Horowitz is the most recent author to take on 007 in an new novel, Trigger Mortis. He has tried to up-date the suave spy into the 21st century, but lest the past be forgotten, he has also re-introduced Pussy Galore into Bond's life. Horowitz talked to NPRs Robert Siegel. (And if anyone is seeking my opinion, I think Idris Elba would make a terrific Bond. Just saying.)
Bond, James Bond

Keith Rice at Word and Film had these thoughts on the best horror films based on books. It is a good selection, and I feel good to know that I'm not the only one who thinks highly of Kubrick's adaptation of The Shining. Personally, I've never been an Exorcist fan, and kind of wish he'd included James Whale's The Bride of Frankenstein, even if the screenplay doesn't resemble Mary Shelly's work much at all.
"The Book Was Better" - or Not?

Speaking of Stephen King, as I just was in an oblique sort of way, Congrats to the horror novelist for being one of this years honorees for the National Medal of Arts. President Obama gave him the award this past Thursday night.
Stephen King a National Medal of Arts Honoree

If you have the time, this essay by Dan Chiasson on Ralph Waldo Emerson is worth a read. I'm not sure why Emerson isn't talked about more these days. I think he still remains relevant to our times, and it is good to see him appreciated.
Emerson Appreciated

This article by Art Winslow about a novel entitled Cow Country, authored by one Adrian Jones Pearson, is worth a look, too. He offers the opinion that in fact, author Pearson is none other than Thomas Pynchon, or his twin brother, or something. I'm not quite sure what to make of it, but his description of the work would certainly remind many of the old recluse himself.
So Who Really Wrote 'Cow Country'?

If you are heading to your favorite independent bookseller or to the library this weekend, you may want to check out this list of women authors in translation for ideas on what to pick up. An impressive group from Flavorwire.

Finally, a mystery solved for those of you who wonder what your cats are up to while you are not at home. And this wouldn't be the internets, if we didn't include cute cat pictures. H/T to my friend from Second Life, Stranger Nightfire.
It's The Internet So It's Cat Picture Time

Please have a great weekend, filled with lots of reading and many books. And please let us know what good books you've got going.

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The Book Booth: Labor Day Edition

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Image: FlavorWire

The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. @SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore here, as well as a brick and mortar storefront mini-store in Hoquiam, WA at 706 Simpson Ave (Route 101 South). Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

The Book Booth: Labor Day Edition

I guess Labor Day is supposed to mark the end of summer in some cultural sense. Certainly there is the nip of Fall in the air here and in our little town, school is set to begin again. Let's all enjoy the long weekend, and let us honor those men and women who really built America, and continue to do so.

Some colleges and universities have begun their school years already, while others will gear up at the end of September. Flavorwire recently suggested some book titles that may appear in some curricula that you may want to take a gander at. The fifty or so books here are slanted well towards the modern and post-modern, but it is an interesting list, nonetheless.
Assigned College Textbooks You Might Want to Read Whether You're in College or Not

Presidential election politics are heating up, about six months too soon, if you ask me, but there we are. All the major candidates will author (or, more probably, have ghost-written) books about themselves, or have books written about them. Not to worry. The election is a mere 14 months away and the 2020 campaign wont start until six to eight months later. That said, Publishers Weekly notes that Bernie Sanders leads the way in book publishing. So you can feel the Bern here.
Bernie Sanders Books

So many books get published every year. And yet many more languish in editor's slush piles and get either a cursory reading or just plain rejected. Few books by unknown authors see the light of day. Judith Guest's Ordinary People comes to mind. A Confederacy of Dunces went from publisher to publisher before Louisiana University Press finally issued it. Ruth Gaim, whose novel Into the Valley was just published by the Soho Press after sixty rejections. She details her thoughts about rejection here for Publishers Weekly.
So A Publisher Rejects Your Manuscript? So What?

Then again, can a writer have too many works published? There are many authors out there who seem to publish yearly and often more than that. James Patterson. Joyce Carol Oates. Stephen King offers an interesting explanation on being prolific here for the New York Times.
Being Prolific - What Does It Say About an Author?
(written by Stephen King)

By the way, the Nobel Prizes will be announced in October, and Joyce Carol Oates should be happy to know that she is in the top five, according to the odds makers at 13 to 1.
Who Are the Nobel Prize in Literature Contenders?

Good news for the fans of Eoin Colfer's eight book Artemis Fowl series. Disney Studios has tapped Kenneth Branagh to develop the books into cinema. The man has done Shakespeare well! He can certainly do Artemis
Kenneth Branagh to Develop Eoin Colfer Book

As you may remember, the beloved Terry Pratchett, author of the Discworld series, passed away from complications from Alzheimer's Disease last March. The good news is that his 41st book of the series, The Shepherd's Crown, has been published and it has received some fine reviews.
5 Stars for Terry Pratchett's Final Novel

Finally we note the passing of Dr. Oliver Sacks this week. His books were fascinating explorations of the brain. I remember how much I loved his Awakenings, which I read some forty years ago now (and filmed nicely with Robin Williams and Robert DeNiro). His books will always be a source of pleasure and interest.
Dr. Oliver Sacks Has Left Us

Have a terrific long weekend and enjoy some good books! And, as always, please do let us know what books you are loving.

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The Book Booth: Happy Bloomsday Edition

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Image: from Bustle

The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. @SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore here, as well as a brick and mortar storefront mini-store in Hoquiam, WA at 706 Simpson Ave (Route 101 South). Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

The Book Booth: Happy Bloomsday Edition

Despite the fact that Google spellcheck doesn't like how I spelled Bloomsday, the anniversary of Leopold Bloom's trek around Dublin on June 16th 1904 is upon us. So grab yourself a gorgonzola sandwich, pour yourself a glass of burgundy and if you happen to be in Dublin, stop into Davy Byrne's pub to celebrate.  #Bloomsday

The summer season is fast approaching with the solstice but days ahead. With that in mind those of us lucky enough to live near large bodies of water can head out to the beach with lotions and books at hand. Bustle has these recommendations for good beach reading. I can't say I'm familiar with any of these titles, but then again, I'm old.
Beach Reading Suggestions

For those of us who'd prefer literary titles, MentalFloss collected these favorite books by well-known authors. Scroll past the Ayn Rand, whom they feature first as she wouldn't have known good literature from a hole in the ground. The rest of them are good. Who knew that Samuel Beckett loved Catcher in the Rye?
What Books Do (or Did) Famous Authors Recommend?

Then there are the stories about the glamorous and not so glamorous in Hollywood. Author Michael Friedman, whose novel Martian Dawn was recently republished, had these novels of Tinseltown on his personal list of the best over at Publishers Weekly. Of course both The Last Tycoon and Day of the Locust are must reads.
10 Best Tinseltown Novels

The New York Times Book Review recently had this short interview with Stephen King. Asked about some of his favorite non-fiction writers, I was pleased to see him name Rick Perlstein, author of some very fine modern American histories, Nixonland and The Invisible Bridge. And I was taken by his selection of Don Robertson as his numero uno novelist.
Stephen King's Favorite NonFiction Writers

You know what modern novels lack? A good duel. I'm sure there is plenty of fisticuffs in today's fiction, but no ten paces, turn around and fire stuff. So it's good to see James Guida at the New Yorker discuss the swashbuckling duels in literature.
Swashbucklers!

Not too long ago, I noted here that Kazuo Ishiguro had recently published a new novel, his first in years, The Buried Giant, and that it contained elements of fantasy. Apparently the book has stirred a bit of controversy among fantasy novel fans and brought out the issues of genre. So at The New Republic, Neil Gaiman and Ishiguro recently discussed the notion of genre and what it means for the literary writer.
What is 'Genre'?

In other book news, the successor to Charles Wright as US Poet Laureate was announced this week. He is the poet Juan Felipe Herrera, author of such collections as Half of the World in Light and Senegal Taxi. I salute the former UCLA Bruin and hope he enjoys his tenure.
New US Poet Laureate is Former UCLA Bruin!

Amazon.com is no stranger to legal probes and the behemoth gets some more scrutiny as European Union regulators will soon examine its dealings in e-readers. NPR reports here.
Amazon and the European Union Antitrust Probe

I know I can be fairly obsessive about books and so can my wife. But I guess I'd really start worrying if either of us displayed any of these symptoms of serious book collecting from this amusing list provided by the New Antiquarian.
How Are Serious Book Collectors Different From You and Me?

Have a splendid weekend my book loving friends and please let us know what books you are enjoying on an early summers day.

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