Archive for stephen king

The Book Booth: Convention Edition

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The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing.  It is written by @SeattleDan and SeattleTammy, operators of an on-line bookstore (which you can find here) , who have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

The Book Booth: Convention Edition

It was quite the spectacle this past week in Cleveland where the Republicans continued the circus their campaign has been all year long, mixed with scenes lifted from Leni Riefenstahl. Now the Democrats will meet in Philadelphia this coming week and one can only hope the adults will be present.

I remember when Donald Trump's The Art of the Deal was published. It came out when there were plenty of other business and management books were also being touted, and the Donald's book was notable because he was a more well-known jerk. And like many of those books, Donald's was ghost-written. Now it appears that his then ghost has no use for Trump, to put it mildly. Jane Mayer of the New Yorker has the profile of Tony Schwartz here in the New Yorker.
Trump Ghostwriter Tells All

And, oddly, the Trump legal staff is not pleased and has sent Mr. Schwartz a cease and desist letter!
Trump Legal Staff Tries To Silence Trump Ghostwriter

So the long and arduous presidential campaign is about to begin and the folks at Publishers Weekly has some book suggestions. It's an uneven list and some of the titles here I'd never bother reading, much less thinking about. Others look to be more interesting.
Feel Like Reading Some Political Books?

Perhaps in the years to come, the 2016 campaign will be the stuff of historical novels. Or horror novels, only time will tell. In any event, Bookriot has this interesting essay by Melissa Lenhardt, author to the new historical novel Sawbones, on writing historical fiction and history text book writing.
Make Your Notes Now For That Historical Fiction (or Textbook? Same Thing?) You Will Want to Write About This Year's Elections Sometime

Mystery writer John Verdon, whose new novel Wolf Lake is now available, recently listed what he regards as the best whodunits. I rather like his idiosyncratic choices. And by all means, go read Ross MacDonald, who remains under appreciated today.
The Best Whodunits

Stephen King's work continues to be adapted for the screen; I had not realized that the number of his works adapted now number close to 200. There are many in the works, including a reboot of It, which has a scary clown. Signature has the scoop on the adaptations now in the works.
Adaptations of Works by Stephen King

I was always more of DC comics kid, but I understood why Marvel Comics had such a large following. Stan Lee was something of a genius. And none other than George R.R. Martin was a huge fanboy. He even had a letter published in a 1964 issue of the Fantastic Four and Stan Lee's response was terrific.
Stan Lee's Response to Fan George R.R. Martin

Ever wonder what it would be like to work in a large bookstore? The Strand in New York is one of the best...and to get employed there, one has to take The Quiz.
Could You Pass The Strand's Quiz?

Around our home, we don't have candles. SeattleTammy is far too sensitive to scents and aromas. And we do have lighting fixtures around the house that are adequate to our needs. But if I were to purchase some candles for illumination these ones featured at Bustle are cool.
Literary Candles

We hope all of you are recovering from the political games and relaxing this weekend with a good book. Please let us know what you are enjoying and have have a good forthcoming week. It might just be a little more sane than the past one.

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The Book Booth: Another Oscar Show Edition

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Image: Truthout


The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing.  It is written by @SeattleDan and SeattleTammy, operators of an on-line bookstore (which you can find here) , who have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

The Book Booth: Another Oscar Show Edition

Indeed, they are rolling out the red carpets Sunday evening in Hollywood as the industry once again celebrates itself with lots of awards and stuff. May all the films you are rooting for win the statuette for outstanding work!

One of Hollywood's most valuable statuettes is actually a film prop, the one of which dreams are made of. Yes, if you have one of the original props of the Maltese Falcon, you've got yourself a treasure there. One year SeattleTammy gave me a replica for Christmas, but it was not enamaled in old jewels alas. Vanity has the story here of the priceless bird here.

Most film adaptations by author? I'd have guessed Stephen King. I'm not even close.
Whose Stories Make It to the BigScreen?

Good news for all Dr. Whovians! Last week saw the publication of the Dr. Who coloring book for your coloring pleasure. Time magazine tells the tale.
Dr. Who? Coloring Book

Although he has never won an Oscar (or been nominated for one), William Shatner has won both an Emmy and a Golden Globe award for his acting efforts. He now has another book available, Lenny, which details his friendship with Leonard Nimoy. Here he talks about Nimoy's second career as a poet.
William Shatner Writes About Leonard Nimoy in Lenny

I have long been fascinated about the relationships between different languages and what we can learn from those relationships. From BusinessInsider comes this wonderful chart, exploring them among the Indo-European and Uralic families. And there are cute cats!
How the Languages We Speak Are Interrelated

On the heels of the news that Harper Lee had passed away last week, we learned that novelist/philosopher Umberto Eco had also died at age 84. His The Name of the Rose is a wonderful mystery novel and more. If you haven't read it, go get a copy now.  NPR remembered the man here.
Umberto Eco Has Left Us at 84

The tribute poured in last week for Harper Lee. Here are five things you may or not have known about the author. I, for one, did not know she was a descendant of Robert E. Lee.
Remembrances of Harper Lee

Noam Chomsky, one of our remaining intellectuals, is still with us and his mind and writings are as active as ever. His new book, What Kind of Creatures are We? is a collection of recent lectures he has given. Here he discusses the work and other matters with Truthout.
Noam Chomsky Chooses Optimism Over Despair 

At my age now, I do try to exercise daily and while I'm not anyone's idea of fit, I do feel the benefits from it. Even better news is that for people who are at retirement age, belonging to a book group could be just as important as exercise in living longer.
More here.

Please have a beautiful weekend with lots of reading and books. By all means, let us know what is delighting you...and have fun watching the Oscars!

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The Book Booth: Fall Edition

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The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. @SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore here, as well as a brick and mortar storefront mini-store in Hoquiam, WA at 706 Simpson Ave (Route 101 South). Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

The Book Booth: Fall Edition

The Fall equinox is upon us, and our journey into winter begins this coming Wednesday, the 23rd. All the signs are here in our little town. The leaves are turning and falling from the trees; the rain is beginning to return and stores have their Halloween displays up. And you can now purchase your Halloween cards for everyone on your list.

The Fall brings into Award Season, as well. The Nobel Prizes will be announced in early October. And the Booker Man Award for fiction will be presented on October 13th. This prize, once open only to Brits and writers in the Commonwealth, is now pretty much open to any novel written in English. And among this years shortlisted nominees is Anne Tyler for her novel Spool of Blue Thread. You can see the nominations here:
Booker Man Award Nominations

And the BBC provides also a guide to the books here. H/T to Lucian for providing this link.
BBC Guide to Booker Man Award Nominations

The long-lists for the National Book Awards, which are scheduled for November 18th, have also been announced and can be viewed here:
National Book Awards

The winner for this years PEN Literary Awards have already been announced this past week, and the ceremony for the honorees will be held in Beverly Hills on November 16th. The LA Times has the winners and other details here.
PEN Literary Awards

With the coming of Fall, also comes the opening of the football season. Quirk Books wondered what some novels would have looked like had they been written as tie-ins for some NFL teams.
NFL Teams Reimagined Novels

And October will bring us the baseball playoffs as well as the World Series. The folks at the Society for Baseball Research (or, more simply, SABR) had these recommendations for baseball reading. It is a pretty long list, but has a lot of good things for the baseball fan. That would be me.
Baseball Reading

Speaking of long lists, Publishers Weekly thought that the best books for the Fall Season were released this past September 14th. Here they provide the titles with descriptions, and it does look to be a good year for some good books.
Best Books for the Fall

Even authors like to take breaks from the tyranny of the blank page, and turn on the TeeVee machine. Flavorwire featured some writers favorite programs here. I am with Stephen King and his choice of The Americans. Good show! And, of course, The Wire is excellent.
What TV Programs Do Writers Watch?

Ever wonder what it would have been like to have culture icon George Carlin as a parent? Wonder no longer. His daughter Kelly Carlin provides the answer in her new memoir, A Carlin Home Companion. I don't think it would have been easy.
George Carlin As A Parent

I don't think I'd have been comfortable living in a hobbit hole, being a fairly tall man. But Dan Pauley has found some storybook homes that look delightful and pleasing to the eye. Via Boing Boing.
Storybook Homes

And I suppose Halloween will be upon us soon enough. If you know or have some naughty children, you may want to check out these scary Swedish stories. We know that the nights are long in Scandinavia, and these people have the time to get you very, very frightened. Again, via Boing Boing.
Scary Swedish Stories

Have a good weekend, filled with books and by all means, let us know what books you are treasuring.

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The Book Booth: Back To School Edition

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The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. @SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore here, as well as a brick and mortar storefront mini-store in Hoquiam, WA at 706 Simpson Ave (Route 101 South). Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

The Book Booth: Back to School Edition

Yes, school is back! As I type, I can see all those kids, ages 5 to 18, backpacks laden with books, heading on home for the day. (I don't see them leave for school, because who gets up that early when you don't have to?). My best wishes to all the students and may you have successful academic years.

For the fashion-minded English major who really wants to show off his or her literary cred, Litographs has this cool selection of t-shirts.
Literary T-Shirts

Or if none of those please, take a look at the stylings from Bustle.
And More Literary T-Shirts!

The James Bond franchise keeps chugging along. The British novelist Anthony Horowitz is the most recent author to take on 007 in an new novel, Trigger Mortis. He has tried to up-date the suave spy into the 21st century, but lest the past be forgotten, he has also re-introduced Pussy Galore into Bond's life. Horowitz talked to NPRs Robert Siegel. (And if anyone is seeking my opinion, I think Idris Elba would make a terrific Bond. Just saying.)
Bond, James Bond

Keith Rice at Word and Film had these thoughts on the best horror films based on books. It is a good selection, and I feel good to know that I'm not the only one who thinks highly of Kubrick's adaptation of The Shining. Personally, I've never been an Exorcist fan, and kind of wish he'd included James Whale's The Bride of Frankenstein, even if the screenplay doesn't resemble Mary Shelly's work much at all.
"The Book Was Better" - or Not?

Speaking of Stephen King, as I just was in an oblique sort of way, Congrats to the horror novelist for being one of this years honorees for the National Medal of Arts. President Obama gave him the award this past Thursday night.
Stephen King a National Medal of Arts Honoree

If you have the time, this essay by Dan Chiasson on Ralph Waldo Emerson is worth a read. I'm not sure why Emerson isn't talked about more these days. I think he still remains relevant to our times, and it is good to see him appreciated.
Emerson Appreciated

This article by Art Winslow about a novel entitled Cow Country, authored by one Adrian Jones Pearson, is worth a look, too. He offers the opinion that in fact, author Pearson is none other than Thomas Pynchon, or his twin brother, or something. I'm not quite sure what to make of it, but his description of the work would certainly remind many of the old recluse himself.
So Who Really Wrote 'Cow Country'?

If you are heading to your favorite independent bookseller or to the library this weekend, you may want to check out this list of women authors in translation for ideas on what to pick up. An impressive group from Flavorwire.

Finally, a mystery solved for those of you who wonder what your cats are up to while you are not at home. And this wouldn't be the internets, if we didn't include cute cat pictures. H/T to my friend from Second Life, Stranger Nightfire.
It's The Internet So It's Cat Picture Time

Please have a great weekend, filled with lots of reading and many books. And please let us know what good books you've got going.

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