Archive for spring

The Book Booth: St. Patrick's Day Edition

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The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore, as well a brick and mortar in small town Washington State. Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

The Book Booth: St. Patrick's Day Edition I know today is actually the Ides of March, but I know few people who actually still celebrate the assassination of Julius Caesar these days. And I'm not at all sure what such a celebration would entail. I have the feeling I wouldn't like it. But St. Patricks Day....it's time to break out the green beer. Because nothing says all things Irish like green beer. Speaking of odd things like green beer, you may have seen this floating around the internets. The Meta Picture had these books you may not have realized were real.  I can attest to many of them. And possibly NSFW.

For those of you looking for a craft project this weekend, check out some of these book dioramas that Flavorwire posted.

But if you anything like SeattleTammy and me, what you really need are more bookshelves. So to inspire you, check out these bookshelves provided by Bustle. Some of these are simply stunning.  What wouldn't look better on those shelves than some 19th century editions of Charles Dickens featuring some of these illustrations? A question that has been probably plaguing you for weeks, if not years and decades, is who is the most influential writers out there in today's modern world. Well, based on twitter followers, the Millions has the top five. I have to say I'm pleased to see Stephen Fry in there. I love that guys stuff, whether it is his writings or his other work.

One of the social media modes I personally have not checked out is Tumblr. Apparently I need to do so. Mashable had these places to explore if you happen to be a book nerd. And if you are reading this, you are.

From the book to movie department comes the books one should read before the movie is released from Word and Film. I am particularly looking forward to the adaptation of Thomas Pynchon's Inherent Vice. I don't think Pynchon has been filmed before.  Not to be outdone, MentalFloss featured six books that took some time from print to celluloid.

Though the last pick is a stretch, and not one I'm going to rush out and see.  I am a big fan of Latin American literature and especially of magical realism. For those who'd like to look into this world of fiction, the Latin Times has this excellent list. It seems odd but a number of first-person narratives are unnamed. More than I would have thought as this list from Flavorwire shows.

Good people, I hope all of you have a pleasant weekend with many books to read. And if you plan to party on St. Pat's day, be careful and be good. St. Patrick wants it that way. And let us know what books you got in your pile!

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#TPC Political Carnival Spring Fundraiser- You Keep Us Going!

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cantdoitwithoutyou

As you know, Paddy has mounting doctor bills, and TPC has mounting TPC bills.

We recently tried to update the look and mechanics of The Political Carnival, but ended up running into so many tech issues that we had to stop, go back to our old look, and hire someone to help us find our way out of our technical house of mirrors.

Which brings us to this:

hand out for money donationsWe're long overdue for our quarterly fundraiser, mainly because we are so reluctant to have our hands out, but, as Nickelodeon used to say, "A kid's gotta do what a kid's gotta do."

So if you are able, if you are so inclined, please donate. Paddy, Lucian, and I have expenses up to our collective chins and can't do this without your help.

Thank you ahead of time for your consistent kindness and generosity. Without you, there would be no us.





Donate

or Email us here for a snail mail address. THANKS!

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#TPC Spring Fundraiser- We can’t do this without you!

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donate fundraiser

As you know, Paddy has mounting doctor bills, and TPC has mounting TPC bills.

We recently tried to update the look and mechanics of The Political Carnival, but ended up running into so many tech issues that we had to stop, go back to our old look, and hire someone to help us find our way out of our technical house of mirrors.

Which brings us to this:

hand out for money donationsWe're long overdue for our quarterly fundraiser, mainly because we are so reluctant to have our hands out, but, as Nickelodeon used to say, "A kid's gotta do what a kid's gotta do."

So if you are able, if you are so inclined, please donate. Paddy, Lucian, and I have expenses up to our collective chins and can't do this without your help.

Thank you ahead of time for your consistent kindness and generosity. Without you, there would be no us.






Donate

or Email us here for a snail mail address. THANKS!

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The Book Booth: April Showers Edition

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tulipsrain

The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore, as well a brick and mortar in small town Washington State. Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

After having such a beautiful start to our Spring, we are now in the early Spring deluge. Who'd have expected rain in the Pacific Northwest this time of year? Or any time of year? Life is full of surprises.

This photo from Flicker is very interesting. Authors often diagram their works before writing, so they have some sense of the narrative flow. Here is Joseph Heller's chart for Catch-22 (which began life as Catch-18, but changed when Leon Uris' novel Mila 18 was published at about the same time).

Hilary Clinton is no stranger to the writing/publishing process. Her 1996 work It Takes a Village did well. And now scheduled for 2014, a mere two years before the next Presidential election, is her memoir of her years as Secretary of State. Simon and Schuster will have the publishing honors and Publishers Weekly has the scoop.

In the Well, Of course department, we have this story reported by NPR. I'll bet you thought those sweet librarians at your local library and the booksellers over at your nearby Barnes and Noble were innocent purveyors of art and beauty. Guess again. They're actually facilitators of PORN!

Maybe these folks were thinking of the muscular men and scantily clad women that Frank Frazetta painted for the covers of the oh-so-many covers of mass-market paperbacks in the sixties. ABEBooks had a feature on his career with many of those covers here.

There a bunch of lists this week for you to peruse. First off, the Smithsonian offers the top ten Travel books written. It is fun to see On the Road on the list. On first glance, it is a buddy/road novel, but Kerouac did offer up many descriptions of the places he visited, and I recall well his evocations of the Bay Area, Denver and Mexico.

Arguments about what should and should not be included in the "Canon" of literature will continue long after we're all gone. But I rather like the titles Qwiklit arrived at for this list. These books are all worthwhile reads.

It may not seem like it sometimes, but we were all young once. Emily Temple at Flavorwire has these photos of writers as teen-agers.Let me note that Allen Gingsberg looks uncannily like a young Stephen Hawking. Just saying.

My current read at the moment is Richard Russo's fine novel, Empire Falls, which I should have read years ago. It is about small-town life in Maine, so I found this list from the Publishers Weekly of novels very intriguing.

Finally, you might think some writers are total techno-phobes. I have a hard time imagining William Fauklner or Flannery O'Connor taking to the twittershpere. But not so with these writers, who seem to thrive there. The Telegraph has a photo gallery of the twitter-prolific here.

May the sunshine where you are today and may you find some great books to read. Let us know what works are on your nightstand this weekend.

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Video- White House Kitchen Garden Planting Spring 2013

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The Book Booth: Easter Edition

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easter bunnies

The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore, as well a brick and mortar in small town Washington State. Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

We have a fine Spring weekend to look forward to in our little town, with sun, mild temps. After a winters long rain, SeattleTammy and I are anxious to get out into the garden, plant some stuff, and bicycling around the town. Not to mention the big house projects. We may even get around to doing some reading.

The big book news this week was the purchase of Goodreads by Amazondotcom. I do have a Goodreads account, but I have never bothered with it much. And many of my learned friends have deleted theirs, once they heard the news. Wired had this rather acerbic view of the matter.

And I have heard this alternative site may be the place to turn to, if that is the way your literary soul leads you.

Publishers Weekly recently concluded its poll on The Great American Novel. As these things go, I guess I am not surprised that Mockingbird headed the list, although I didn't vote for it. The PW blog had these reflections.

Meanwhile, over at the Atlantic Monthly, there are some authors who actually liked the film adaptations of their books. I liked this article, in part because that except for Cloud Atlas, I have both read and seen these movies, and enjoyed them all in varying degrees. (I can certainly recommend both Orchid Thief and Adaptation, with its very quriky screenplay by Charlie Kaufmann).

I can't recommend breaking the law, but Buzzfeed found some great graffiti examples of literary worth to share.

The folks at Buzzfeed had a busy week. They also found some very cool bookplates of celebrities past for our enjoyment.

It is always interesting to see famous writers correspondence and it is even more interesting to see the fan letters they can write to other authors. Emily Tempe at Flavorwire culled these examples. Nine fan letters and one not so fawining.

Not often do I see works of fiction in newspapers. The Guardian, the best paper on American politcs, as someone noted ironically, ran this short story by Neill Gaiman. Take the time to read it. Gaiman is always worth it.

I'll sadly note the passing of writer and journalist Anthony Lewis this week. His book Gideon's Trumpet is still used in law schools and will be for years to come. Another voice we shall miss.

Finally, the good folks at Maria's Bookshop in Colorado explain why we love bookselling. Hat tip to my old friend and colleague, Michael Coy for finding this YouTube:

A Happy Easter to everyone celebrating and a great weekend for us all. Tell us what's on your nightstand.

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Video Mid Day Distraction: The Red-Headed Woodpecker

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To my knowledge there's nothing political about red-headed woodpeckers but in the spirit of 'let's think about spring and not politics for a change' I will be posting about trees, birds, bees, and flowers for a while until Paddy returns.

Enjoy.

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