Archive for segregation

Missouri Governor Once Tried To End Desegratation

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Missouri Ferguson Jay Nixon

When Jay Nixon was attorney general of Missouri he filed a motion to end desegregation claiming it was not cost effective. The Washington Post reports: Nixon's position infuriated the local NAACP, anger that was resurrected shortly before he decided to again seek a Senate seat again in 1998. While he was speaking at a Democratic dinner…

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50 Murders In The White House

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Dozier school

The White House in question is on the segregated campus of the Dozier School for boys, a reform school in Marianna, Florida. The building was described by one of the former attendees as a torture chamber. Kids were punished there and never returned.

Recently, according to The Raw Story,

...more than 50 bodies were discovered, some in unmarked graves, next to a garbage dump on the side of campus where the African-American students were housed.

When the University of Florida petitioned the state to exhume the bodies and investigate the cause of death and try to identify the victims, they were refused permission by the Florida Secretary of State. After extensive appeals to a reluctant Governor Rick Scott, enough pressure was brought about. He finally succumbed to the protestations of a group of the school's former attendees, who banded together seeking justice. They operate under the name, The White House Boys.

White house boys

Head anthropologist Erin Kimmerle told CNN, “These are children who came here and died, for one reason or another, and have just been lost in the woods.” She is hoping to be able to match the DNA of some of the recovered remains to families who have been waiting for answers, and to determine some of the causes of the deaths of the bodies she finds. “When there’s no knowledge and no information, then people will speculate and rumors will persist or questions remain,” she added.

This tragic action by the state went unchecked for so many years. It's about time light was shed on this travesty. It's time the remains are returned to the families, even it it's fifty years late.

Police most recently told Al Jazeera news that there was no way to sustain a criminal investigation since all but one of the school’s former employees was dead and the remaining employee would be unable to testify.

Below is a touching Al Jazeera video report of the excavation that is going on right now. It's a chapter of Florida history that at this time, while we're remembering Dr. Martin Luther King's speech of fifty years ago, is most appropriate. We have come a long way when light is shed on injustices of the past. And there's so much farther to go. It makes you wonder what other secrets we're covering up, even today.

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What I will not write about today

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frustrated14

Sometimes I get so frustrated and/or disheartened and/or annoyed by some of the news stories of the day that I can’t bring myself to write about them. Here are a few recent reports that made my blood pressure hit the roof. I am avoiding delving into them at length out of concern for my physical and mental health.

And just to get you really riled up:

chart gun deaths v terrorism deaths

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

See what I mean? So who’s up for a couple of Margs or a trough of wine?

drunk wine

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Cartoons of the Day- Jackie Robinson

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421

 

42

 

Forty-Two

Via.

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What I will not write about today

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frustrated2

One of TPC's contributors, Andy Marquis, linked me to a couple of the items that I will not write about today, and I included his comments. See, sometimes I get so frustrated and/or disheartened and/or annoyed by some of the news stories of the day that I can’t bring myself to write about them.

Here are a few recent reports that made my blood pressure hit the roof. I am avoiding delving into them at length out of concern for my physical and mental health:

GA seniors push for integrated prom: Yes, "students at Wilcox County High School have two separate proms-- one for whites, the other for students of color." As Andy said, I thought it was 2013 not 1963.

Virginia woman pleads no contest in death of unborn child: She faced charges of involuntary manslaughter and DUI. Andy: "'Unborn child' - how the fuck can you kill something that isn't alive, idiots." And so the endless debate over when life begins continues. I have no doubt I'll be hearing about this one from Twitter trolls galore.

Mike Huckabee: Obama May Be Planning To Grab Guns And Launch A Nazi-Like Dictatorship: HuckaTwit does it again. Lather, wince, repeat.

More Sandy-Style Superstorms Likely Headed For Europe, Thanks To Global Warming: Why do we continue to push our luck? What does it take?

STUDY: States With Loose Gun Laws Have Higher Rates Of Gun Violence: Duh. DuhduhduhDUH.

See what I mean? So who’s up for a couple of Margs or a trough of wine?

drunk smaller

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"Charter co-locating at our school will harm... our democracy... It will teach my kids that segregation is OK."

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public school sinking cartoon via Philly.com

We enrolled our twins in public schools and, for a short time, in a private school. The reason we switched to a private elementary school for two years is that our neighborhood school lost funding for art and music programs, and my kids needed them badly (as do all kids, but our boys were going through some very tough times, and drawing and painting were outlets we couldn't do without).

As soon as they became old enough to enter middle school, back to public school they went. We never looked back.

Analise Dubner has written a lengthy, substantive blog about her own child and the decisions that her family had to make regarding public v. private v. charter schools, and the bias against public schools.

Here are a few excerpts (bolding mine), but please link over to the entire must-read post:

My husband and I put our son into private school, even though we couldn't afford it. We did this without even looking at our local Elementary.  [...]

It was a fine school, yes, we liked it there, liked the teachers, made a few lifelong friends, our kid did well... we promptly burned through our savings, and just like that, it was over... So, we girded ourselves and walked bravely down to the School Of Ill Repute (known to others as Micheltorena Elementary), and we took the Open House tour. And ... 
...we @#$% loved it. [...]

What if I told you that you can actually take your local school and make it what you want it to be? I know that's not what you believe, not what you've been LED to believe. [...]

Turns out you can teach your kids just fine and still take that ridiculous test. I just pack a lunch for my kids, and we find ways to work around or with the rules we've got. I talk to my kids, help them with their projects, and I know they are engaged, smart and curious. That's the real litmus test.

We all know that there has been a movement in this country for the last 20 years to dismantle the very idea of public education and that it has led us to a place where a privately-run, unaccountable, sometimes-corporate Charter School is being touted as the answer. Some established, proven Charters (like many Public schools) are perfectly good schools, but if you've done any real homework, you have to know that these legions of new schools are just as likely to fail your kids as any public school, and that, often, these untried schools are (by law) allowed to paw through public school assets just to get started. [...]

[M]any Charters have younger, inexperienced teachers using untested "progressive" techniques created as lures for enrollment. So many parents end up as 'Charter-Hoppers' because these untested programs fail their children. I know you want to believe that 'new' is better because obviously 'old' has failed, right? I've got some shocking news. My son's 4th grade uses 'progressive' project-based learning techniques. I know! Public school! What-what?! [...]

This isn't about a bunch of local parents barking territorially at intruders. The Charter co-locating at our school will harm our kids, harm our school, harm our democracy. I'm sorry to put it so bluntly and so melodramatically, but that's what I believe. It doesn't just compete for enrollment, jeopardize our Elementary's future, take our classrooms, or bog down our Principal's already-stretched time with administrative haggling over resources; it will teach my kids lessons I only want them to read and puzzle over in history books - that segregation is OK. 

What did she just say? Why use such a loaded word? Because what we are seeing now is precisely what segregation is. This Charter, like so many others have done already in this very city, wants to put a dividing line down the middle of our school grounds so their kids aren't contaminated by our kids - in direct opposition to the very ideals this country is supposedly built on.

Just go read the rest of this piece, please. And then share it with as many people as you can.

By the way, this isn't a political piece, there is no mention of unions, guns, or religion. We've covered that in previous posts here at TPC.

Added: Here is a comment left by the author in response to one of her commenters:

Thank you so much for your reasonable comments. I KNOW you just want what's best for your kid and you think you found it. But I do want you to consider the consequences of this Charter's actions. I know you love what the CWC curriculum has to offer, but what if the price is too high to get it? That's all I'm really asking you to consider. The presence of this Charter at our school means: 1) Susanna has to spend time she doesn't have wrangling over resources, 2) we can no longer use the rooms (that we are using) that the Charter would take, 3) competition for much-needed enrollment at a VITAL time in our growth, 4) jeopardizing the dual language program we had intended to start next year, and, (to me) most importantly, 5) creating a sense on our campus, amongst our kids, that the Charter kids are different...sectioned off... BETTER than our kids. Why do we think this? We've already heard all the talk about how the Charter wants to hire security to "protect" their kids from ours. That the CWC was considering building a FENCE around the Bungalows they mean to occupy.Other co-locating Charters post teachers outside the bathrooms to make sure the public school kids don't go inside while a Charter kid is using them. Teachers instruct kids not to speak to each other.

So, Jane, please, honestly. Is that not segregation? You want to put your kid in that? How good does a curriculum have to be to make you want to create that kind of place for children? Ours... or yours?

And from another of her comments:

Healthy competition? Sure, compete away. But, would you consider it healthy competition if someone who dreamed of opening their own sandwich shop were to walk into an existing sandwich shop, steal their sandwiches and then sell them to the shop's customers out of the shop's bathroom?

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PhotOH! Slavery, racial segregation and 2012 elections

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Via

The more things change...

H/t: @FereJohn

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