Archive for republican hypocrites

Video- Paul Ryan Touts His 'Self Reliance' During His Teenage Years, Ignoring His Family's Reliance on Social Security Benefits

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Paul Ryan is the evilest kind of politician 'cause he comes across as very very serious and very very sincere. He just wants to save us from ourselves. Kudos to Heather for catching this prime example of fearmongering hypocrisy.

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Quote of the Day- Joe Biden Style

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"That's what I find absolutely bizarre: Republicans moralizing about deficits. That's like an arsonist moralizing about fire safety. These guys have zero credibility."

-- Vice President Joe Biden, quoted by the Orlando Sentinel, speaking to Florida Democrats.

Gotta love him. Via Taegan.

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Video- The Daily Show: End O'Potamia

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This is hands down one of the best segments I've ever seen Jon do.

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Michele Bachmann missed every House vote in September

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Meet the Hypocridiot-O'-The-Day, Representative Michele Bachmann. Via The Hill:

After Standard and Poor’s downgraded the U.S. credit rating in August, Rep. Michele Bachmann (R-Minn.) called for Congress to return immediately from its recess to restore the nation’s AAA rating. [...]

The House held 60 votes during the month of September, and the Minnesota Republican missed them all.

Tsk, tsk, tsk, some-body's been out campaigning and straw polling  instead of doing her day job:

Bachmann arrived in the Capitol in time to hold a press conference rebutting Obama, and she left town before the first votes the next morning. Bachmann last voted on Aug. 1.

Kristin Sosanie, a spokeswoman for the Minnesota Democratic-Farmer-Labor Party (the state’s affiliate of the national Democratic Party) said that even before Bachmann started campaigning, she'd missed more House votes than any other member of the Minnesota delegation.

But as her spokesperson says, at least she keeps in touch with her staff. That's clearly exactly the same as casting votes that supposedly represent the voters in her district.

Bachmann’s scant voting record complicates her argument on the campaign trail that she is leading the fight against over-spending in Washington. She did not participate in the congressional dispute last month over spending levels for fiscal 2012, and she did not vote on measures to keep the federal government running past Sept. 30.

Of course, the Republican leadership is fine with all this, because Bachmann often votes against her own party. And ours. 

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The moral revolution: "Conservatives are pushing aside compassion"

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Neal Gabler has an op-ed in today's L.A. Times that ties in to one by Tim Rutten that I posted yesterday. I wrote this:

For a very long time now, the GOP has divided America with their self-righteous insistence on legislating religion, their own beliefs, and illogical reliance on what they feel is moral superiority. But their “us vs. them”, our-way-only attitude is destructive, no matter how they label it.

The War on Women, the GOP's hypocritical intrusive government overreach, under the guise of "our morals are better than your morals", "our god is more valid than your god (or lack thereof)" have become so invasive, so prevalent, that thankfully, more and more (badly needed) commentary is making its way out there, including by Rachel Maddow (on a regular basis).

Neal Gabler took a broader look at the "moral revolution" and what it's doing to this country:

But over the last 30 years or so, something has happened to reshape the country's moral geography. Everyone knows about the rise of Moral Majority-style Christian evangelicals as a potent force in right-wing politics. It injected a certain aggressive moralism into our political discourse and led to campaigns against abortion rights, homosexual rights, sexual freedom and other issues perceived as and then framed as moral matters. As a result, our politics became "moralized"; they were transformed into a contest of one set of values pitted against another. [...]

One can see this division in something as simple as the denigration of the term "liberal," the "L" word, with its attendant idea that to be compassionate, caring and tolerant — virtues that had been celebrated, if only via lip service, by most Americans — is really to be mush-minded, weak and, more concretely, willing to give taxpayer largesse to the undeserving and lazy. (This was essentially the argument that some Republicans, such as former Sen. Judd Gregg (R-N.H.), used when they sought to deny an extension of unemployment benefits. [...]

If compassion is seen as softness, tolerance as a kind of promiscuity, community as a leech on individuals and fairness as another word for scheming, we are a harder nation than we used to be, and arguably a less moral one as well. In undergoing a revolution for the nation's soul, we may have found ourselves losing it.

And who is suffering as a result? The poor, the middle class, women, minorities, LGBT groups, unions, children, disenfranchised voters... which means, of course, Democrats.

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How hypocritical are Republicans? Let me count the ways...

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There is a strong theme running through a lot of my stories lately:

  1. Newt Gingrich, a fiscal conservative? Not when it comes to Tiffany’s. In 2005 and 2006, the former House speaker turned presidential candidate carried as much as $500,000 in debt to the premier jewelry company, according to financial disclosures filed with the Clerk of the House of Representatives.... When asked by POLITICO whether Gingrich has settled this debt, and why he owed between a quarter-million and a half-million dollars to a jeweler, Rick Tyler, Gingrich’s spokesman, declined to comment.  “No comment,” he said in an email.
  2. Rick Santorum, you cannot be serious: John McCain "doesn't understand how enhanced interrogation works."
  3. Senate ethics committee: Rick Santorum tipped off John Ensign
  4. Arnold Schwarzenegger admits to fathering a love child... 10 years ago
  5. GOP whiplash
  6. Rachel Maddow exposes the “small gov’t.” hypocrisy of intrusive GOP
  7. Gingrich in a Newtshell
  8. Rachel explains John Ensign’s sins
  9. Dems mock GOP for not focusing on job creation
  10. Condoleezza Rice, Hypocridiot-O’-The-Day
  11. Christopher Lee resigns from Congress
  12. Gov. Scott Walker declares Women’s Health Week in Wisconsin. Not kidding.
  13. Oops! Michele Bachmann demands freedom of speech… except for the L.A. Times
  14. If only the press had used a hidden camera to tape James O’Keefe…
  15. Newtrimony: Marriage between a man and a woman and a woman and a woman

And that's just for starters.

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Video- Newt Gingrich confronted by student over affairs

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I want to give that gal a big fat hug.

(CNN) – Newt Gingrich was forced to wade into the thorny matter of his personal life Tuesday night during a forum at the University of Pennsylvania.

In a question-and-answer session, Isabel Friedman, a student at the university who's also Democratic activist, pressed Gingrich on how he squares his pro-family values with the fact he has been married three times and has admitted to two extramarital affairs.

"You adamantly oppose gay rights... but you've also been married three times and admitted to having an affair with your current wife while you were still married to your second," Friedman said, in comments first reported by Politico. "As a successful politician who's considering running for president, who would set the bar for moral conduct and be the voice of the American people, how do you reconcile this hypocritical interpretation of the religious values that you so vigorously defend?"

(snip)

"I've had a life which, on occasion, has had problems," said Gingrich. "I believe in a forgiving God, and the American people will have to decide whether that's their primary concern."

"If the primary concern of the American people is my past, my candidacy would be irrelevant," he continued. "If the primary concern of the American people is the future . . . that's a debate I'll be happy to have."

Gingrich has admitted to cheating on his second wife in the late 1990's with the woman who is now his wife. He's also acknowledged having an affair with the woman who became his second wife while he was married to his first wife.

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