Archive for pulitzer

The Book Booth: Fall Edition

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

BookBoothStorybookHousesw244h294

The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. @SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore here, as well as a brick and mortar storefront mini-store in Hoquiam, WA at 706 Simpson Ave (Route 101 South). Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

The Book Booth: Fall Edition

The Fall equinox is upon us, and our journey into winter begins this coming Wednesday, the 23rd. All the signs are here in our little town. The leaves are turning and falling from the trees; the rain is beginning to return and stores have their Halloween displays up. And you can now purchase your Halloween cards for everyone on your list.

The Fall brings into Award Season, as well. The Nobel Prizes will be announced in early October. And the Booker Man Award for fiction will be presented on October 13th. This prize, once open only to Brits and writers in the Commonwealth, is now pretty much open to any novel written in English. And among this years shortlisted nominees is Anne Tyler for her novel Spool of Blue Thread. You can see the nominations here:
Booker Man Award Nominations

And the BBC provides also a guide to the books here. H/T to Lucian for providing this link.
BBC Guide to Booker Man Award Nominations

The long-lists for the National Book Awards, which are scheduled for November 18th, have also been announced and can be viewed here:
National Book Awards

The winner for this years PEN Literary Awards have already been announced this past week, and the ceremony for the honorees will be held in Beverly Hills on November 16th. The LA Times has the winners and other details here.
PEN Literary Awards

With the coming of Fall, also comes the opening of the football season. Quirk Books wondered what some novels would have looked like had they been written as tie-ins for some NFL teams.
NFL Teams Reimagined Novels

And October will bring us the baseball playoffs as well as the World Series. The folks at the Society for Baseball Research (or, more simply, SABR) had these recommendations for baseball reading. It is a pretty long list, but has a lot of good things for the baseball fan. That would be me.
Baseball Reading

Speaking of long lists, Publishers Weekly thought that the best books for the Fall Season were released this past September 14th. Here they provide the titles with descriptions, and it does look to be a good year for some good books.
Best Books for the Fall

Even authors like to take breaks from the tyranny of the blank page, and turn on the TeeVee machine. Flavorwire featured some writers favorite programs here. I am with Stephen King and his choice of The Americans. Good show! And, of course, The Wire is excellent.
What TV Programs Do Writers Watch?

Ever wonder what it would have been like to have culture icon George Carlin as a parent? Wonder no longer. His daughter Kelly Carlin provides the answer in her new memoir, A Carlin Home Companion. I don't think it would have been easy.
George Carlin As A Parent

I don't think I'd have been comfortable living in a hobbit hole, being a fairly tall man. But Dan Pauley has found some storybook homes that look delightful and pleasing to the eye. Via Boing Boing.
Storybook Homes

And I suppose Halloween will be upon us soon enough. If you know or have some naughty children, you may want to check out these scary Swedish stories. We know that the nights are long in Scandinavia, and these people have the time to get you very, very frightened. Again, via Boing Boing.
Scary Swedish Stories

Have a good weekend, filled with books and by all means, let us know what books you are treasuring.

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

The Book Booth: Pulitzer Prize Edition

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

pulitzerlit

The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore, as well a brick and mortar in small town Washington State. Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

Some weeks are better than others and this past one pretty much sucked. Paddy and Laffy offer their mid-day distractions and I've need them this week. I hope that by talking about books, you may enjoy some diversion as well this weekend.

And, of course, the big news in Literature is the announcement of this years Pulitzer Prizes. Publishers Weekly has the list of winners here.

As there was no fiction last year, which provoked all sorts of controversy, NPR's Morning Edition discussed the financial aspects of having a winner during the business segement, with some commentary by Steve Inskeep and David Greene. Listen to the audio.

To be quite honest, I hadn't heard of Adam Johnson and his winning novel, The Orphan Master's Son, which takes place in the recesses of North Korea, so this feature on him in PW comes in handy.

For years, in mystery circles, their have been high accolades for the Belgian author, Georges Simenon. I have read one of his books, but it was in a Spanish translation for an advanced High School class, and I can't remember a thing about it. The blog Guernicamag. had this appreciation of him.

Speaking of my formative educational years, I can't remember any great "campus" novels during my years as an undergraduate. The best one that is close to the years I spent attending the University was Been Down So Long, It Looks Like Up to Me, by Richard Farina, which is still worth reading today. The other one I can think of is The Strawberry Statement, which is not. Flavorwire assures that the campus novel genre is still alive and kicking.

In other book recommends, ABEBooks had this fine feature on books by librarians. I love our local libraries and the librarians who, underpaid and understaffed, do such a great job of bringing the printed word to our communities.

Congrats and kudos to an old friend and colleague, Harry Kirchner, who has ventured into the publishing biz with a new line of re-issued out of print titles. The imprint is Pharos Editions and the announced titles are intriguing. I read Inside Moves years ago and enjoyed it a great deal. Basketball does not lend itself to great reads, but this is the exception. And McTeague, the novel by Frank Norris was famously filmed in the silent era as Greed by Erich Von Stroheim.

In the Book to Film department, it seems that a new documentary on the life and work of the reclusive J.D. Salinger will be released in September and then shown again on PBS this coming January. Rope of Silicon has the poster art and the story.

As far as I know, Salinger's works have never been filmed. He probably didn't need film adaptations to assure his fame. But other authors have benefited a great deal from having their work appear on the silver screen, and Word and Film has a list of six such authors.

Then, again, maybe having your novel filmed isn't such a great idea. Deja View has the list of ten films that have a passing resemblance to the works they're base upon.

Hang in there, dear readers, and enjoy the weekend. Tell us what books you have on your nightstand!

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

The Book Booth: Memorial Day Edition

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore, as well a brick and mortar in small town Washington State. Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

I wish I had mentioned this last week, but it somehow eluded me. But yesterday was Towel Day, a celebration of the life and work of Douglas Adams. Please mark it on your calendars for next year. Or celebrate belatedly!

It is Memorial Day weekend. I hope everyone takes some time to honor those who served our nation in times of crisis. But that doesn't mean you can't do some grilling. Via our friends at Publishers Weekly, here is a very interesting grilling advice. Put the meat on the coals! They swear it works.

And as we wrap up the Merry Month of May, here is a literature quiz from the Guardian about this cheery month. And it isn't an easy one. Good luck.

Many books feature evil children. Who's the worst? Rhoda from The Bad Seed? Pinky from Brighton Rock is pretty darn nasty. And the children in The Midwich Cuckoos are very, very creepy. AbeBooks had a fun blog about these little demons with some great old cover art from the novels.

The big news in publishing this week concerned the annual stockholders meeting of Amazon in Seattle on Thursday. I am glad that Amazon will no longer help fund ALEC. I am also pleased that Amazon was shamed into announcing that they will install air conditioning in their way over-heated warehouses. I've heard many lame excuses and remedies over the years, but I found it galling that Bezos previously had said (and I paraphrase), well, we have paramedics on standby in case someone strokes out due to the heat. Really. How kind of you.

The Cannes Film Festival is taking place until the 27th. There are a number of films based on literature and Publsiher's Weekly gathered up many of the trailers of the films being shown. We've talked about On the Road. I am also looking forward to Cloud Atlas and Cosmopolis. The others look interesting as well.And The Guardian has some commentary here.

Currently there is a lot of buzz about the Christmas release of The Great Gatsby from director Baz Luhrmann. It will star Leonardo. Gatsby has been filmed twice before, the first time starring, improbably, Alan Ladd, and then in the early seventies starring an over-aged Robert Redford, and directed by Jack Clayton who also gave us a great and very frightening adapatation of The Turn of the Screw, The Innocents. The latter adaptation was penned by Francis Ford Coppola, and, alas, it just didn't work. You can see the trailer for the new remake here.

I like Luhrmann and I'm not particularly bothered by his stylized manner. I can see why he'd be attracted to the subject matter. And I'm sure the Academy is dying to give Leo a best acting award. But there has been some backlash to the trailer as evidenced by Vanity Fair. My hope is that Luhrmann goes with a different music score.

And in happier film adaptation news, it looks like one of our favorite novels, A Confederacy of Dunces, may come to the silver screen. I'd have high hopes for this one.

There is a new biography of John Kennedy Toole available now (Da Capo $26.00) which SeattleTammy talks about at our blog.

A good Holiday weekend to everyone. What's on your nightstand?

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

The Book Booth: New Moon Edition

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore, as well a brick and mortar in small town Washington State. Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

We begin this weekend's edition by noting the passing of another literary icon, Carlos Fuentes. Probably best known on our side of the border for his novel, The Old Gringo, he also authored The Death of Artemio Cruz and his highly ambitious Terra Nostra, and his most recently publshed work, Destiny and Desire. Any work by Fuentes is fervently recommended.

Yet more from the Pulitzer Prize contremps, eight authors weighed in at the New York Times Magazine on their choices. Two votes went to David Foster Wallaces's The Pale King.

An interesting short article from the U.K.'s The Guardian on the influences, or lack of them, on contemporary writers. I'm not at all convinced that this is a good thing.

I don't suppose that I am alone in my love for historical fiction. The following list, again, is from the Guardian, and is weighted toward the European. I would have included Gore Vidal. Vidal's novel, Julian, is a brilliant reconstruction of the late Roman Empire. And his novels on American history, Burr, 1876 and Lincoln are all very, very good. And a salute to Mr. Vidal, one of the last remaining public intellectuals left from his generation.

Who doesn't love a flow chart? Here's a great one on books

And here's a phone app for your iphone I bet you never thought you needed!

Finally, we have a profile of Shakespeare and Company, the English language bookstore in Paris that was founded by Sylvia Beach, who was also the original publisher of James Joyce's Ulysses back in the day. The store still exists. I have very fond memories of visiting the store and buying one of Ross McDonald's Lew Archer novels. I devoured the book, while drinking gin avec schweppes at an outdoor cafe. I kept returning to the bookstore, where i bought all the remaining McDonald novels they had, and to the same cafe, where I learned to love the mystery novel. Ahh, the memories.

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare