Archive for Pulitzer Prize Winners

The Book Booth: The Bard Edition

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Image: LATimes
The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing.  It is written by @SeattleDan and SeattleTammy, operators of an on-line bookstore (which you can find here) , who have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

The Book Booth: The Bard Edition

Today, Saturday, is the 400th anniversary of the passing of the Bard in 1616. And it was possibly his birthday as well, making him 52 when he left this mortal coil. He left us with his plays, poetry and introduced as many as 1700 words into the language. Not too shabby!

At Signature, 25 authors, including Margaret Atwood, Lee Child and others were asked about Big Bill and here are there responses. He still retains quite a fan club.
So What Do You Think About This Guy Shakespeare's Work?

In honor of his birthday, Rosie Schaap at the New York Times has created a new punch to celebrate the day, and it looks to be quite tasty.
Yum! A Shakespeare Punch! Raise a Glass!

Miguel Cervantes was a contemporary of Shakespeare's and it may be that they both died on the same day. But there may be more connection between the two writers than that possible coincidence. David Kipen explores that bond here for the LA Times.
Will and Miguel

I suppose many of the lines Shakespeare wrote could be proclaimed on stage and not necessarily shouted. However there are some lines that Electric Literature suggests should be shouted. Loudly.
To Shout or Not to Shout?

If you don't feel like yelling, you can still throw out some quotes from the writers of the "absurd", if you don't mind being thought as another psychotic wandering the streets. Or as Beckett said, I can't go on, I will go on.
Unleash Your Inner Psychotic With These Absurdist Quotes

Like other states in the deep south, Mississippi recently passed legislation that allows for discrimination against the LGBT community there, based on some quaint notion of religious liberty. But we should not take the bigotry as symptomatic of everyone who lives in that great state. A number of writers there have taken a stand against the law, and good on them!
Not All Mississippians Are Bigots.
Read What these Mississippi Writers Have to Say about New Anti-LGBT Laws
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The Pulitzer Prizes were announced this week and you can see the list of winners here. I admit that I am not familiar with the fiction winner, The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen, but from what I've subsequently seen, I need to take a look at it.
2016's Pulitzer Prize Winners

I know that Spring is only a month old at this point, but we've been teased by summer like weather here this week, which puts me into the mood. And it looks like there will be a lot of good books arriving soon, including new works from Russell Banks, Don DeLillo, Annie Proulx as well as Richard Russo who has written a sequel to his very fine novel Nobody's Fool, called Everybody's Fool. Publishers Weekly has its summer recommends here.
Good Books Arriving In Time For The Summer

I have to admit that when it comes to genre writing, I am not much for romance novels. However, Lucian noticed that a pair of sisters has opened a bookstore devoted to romances called the The Ripped Bodice and I have to admire their ambition. Much good luck to them.
This Bookstore Carries Every Romance You Would Ever Want to Read!

I have a new hero. Abdel Kader Haidara is a book collector and librarian in Mali who managed to save many, many old manuscripts and books in his hometown of Timbuktu when it was occupied by an extreme Islamist group. The Wall Street Journal has the story here.
Abdel Kader Haidara Saves Manuscripts Islamist Group Would Destroy

To all of you, a fine weekend filled with books and reading. And hoist one, or two in remembrance of the Bard of Avon. And by all means let us know what books you are enjoying.

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