Archive for Philadelphia

Overnight: Barnes Foundation Museum of Impressionist Art in Philadelphia

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art

I was looking through a back issue of The New Yorker yesterday evening and learned that the Barnes Foundation (Impressionist Art) had moved from its year-long location in Merion, Pennsylvania, into the city of Philadelphia. You can read an excerpt of the article here without a digital archive subscription or the full article if you are a subscriber.

Fortunately, there are also many pages and videos about the Foundation's collection on the web.

I really like this video from WHYY but, unfortunately, it can't be embedded. Please take a look even though it's not embedded.

Here's the Wiki entry for Albert C. Barnes. the man who put this wonderful collection together.

I love the design of the museum itself, designed to be as close to the original Foundation's home for the art as possible.

YouTube has many videos directly from the Barnes Foundation here.

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12-year-old girl dies of asthma; father blames school staff cuts

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philadelphia student dies of asthma

I worked at public schools for years, and a common sight would be a student stepping away to use an inhaler. Occasionally, a kid would forget to bring one, or they would lose theirs, and I would notice them sitting on the floor gasping for breath as school staff scrambled to track down family members or the school nurse who could quickly provide one.

It was always a disturbing and tense scenario, one that I could never shake off, one that is stuck in my memory forever, one that made adults and students alike feel helpless as we tried to comfort the panicky, choking child trying to cope until help arrived.

Twelve-year-old Philadelphia sixth-grader Laporshia Massey had an asthma attack at school and died later that day.

Unfortunately, because of budget cuts, there was no nurse on campus, nor was there a trained medical professional to recognize how serious her symptoms were. So they did what we found ourselves doing, they told her to try to remain calm. The difference was, we were fully staffed and could respond quickly and efficiently.

Laporshia was denied the attention and care she needed, so by the time she was taken to the hospital, it was too late. She lost her life.

Via Philadelphia City Paper:

Sixth-grader Laporshia Massey died from asthma complications, according to her father, who says he rushed her to the emergency room soon after she got home from school on the afternoon of Sept. 25. He says Laporshia had begun to feel ill earlier that day at Bryant Elementary School, where a nurse is on staff only two days a week. This day was not one of those days. 

Daniel Burch, Laporshia’s father, is angry and wants to know whether Philadelphia’s resource-starved school district failed to save his daughter’s life.

“If she had problems throughout the day, why … didn’t [the school] call me sooner?” asks Burch... “Why,” he asks, “didn’t [the school] take her to the hospital?”

Burch's fianceé, Sherri Mitchell, got a call from school during which Laporshia told her, “I can’t breathe. I can’t breathe.” Neither Burch nor Mitchell realized how serious the situation was, thinking that a trained professional at the elementary school would diagnose her.

When Laporshia went to the teacher, she was told that there was "no nurse and just to be calm.” Once school let out, a school staff member drove Laporshia home.

When she got there, her father immediately gave her medication and rushed her to the hospital.

She collapsed in the car, at which point Burch flagged down a passing ambulance in the middle of traffic. Burch says his daughter later died at the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. [...]

The District source believes that Laporshia’s life could have been saved if the school had responded appropriately to her illness. “If they had called rescue, she would still be here today,” the source said.

The Philadelphia school district has been underfunded; Gov. Tom Corbett's budget cuts have let 3,000 staff members go since June. Per the City Paper article, after the initial cuts, a nurse specifically warned that "other staff were not competent to deal with asthmatic students in her absence."

Sadly, the nurse was right.

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Live Streaming Video- Philly 4th of July Jam 8:00p EDT

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This one looked the most interesting to me.

VH1 is set to air Philly 4th of July Jam, the largest free outdoor Fourth of July concert in the country. Hosted by actor-comedian Kevin Hart and featuring homegrown house band The Roots, the exhibition will showcase sets from Jill Scott, J. Cole, Grace Potter, John Mayer, and Ne-Yo. The show was originally slated to feature Demi Lovato as well, but due to strep throat, she’s cancelled her appearance. Rising country star Hunter Hayes takes her place to round out the night’s performances.

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How to watch the fireworks from your couch

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libertyfireworks

NBC: Macy’s 4th of July Fireworks Spectacular (Live 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. ET. Repeat 10 p.m. to 11 p.m. ET)
The 37th annual Macy’s 4th of July Fireworks Spectacular in New York hosted by Nick Cannon, features musical performances by Mariah Carey, Tim McGraw, Taylor Swift, Cher, Pitbull, and Selena Gomez. Despite the special’s star-studded lineup, the highlight is the fireworks show, this year entitled “It Begins with a Spark.” Curated by Usher, the pyrotechnic extravaganza will include over 40,000 fireworks over the Hudson River.

PBS: A Capitol Fourth (Live 8 p.m. to 9:30 p.m. ET. Repeat 9:30 p.m. to 11 p.m. )
Not to be upstaged, the nation’s capitol will hold its own concert and fireworks show, fittingly titled, A Capitol Fourth. Dancing with the Stars‘ Tom Bergeron hosts and Barry Manilow headlines the PBS broadcast live from Washington, D.C., which includes additional performances by Neil Diamond, Scotty McCreery, Darren Criss, Megan Hilty, Motown the Musical, John Williams, and more.

VH1: Philly 4th of July Jam (Live 8 p.m. to 11 p.m.)
VH1 is set to air Philly 4th of July Jam, the largest free outdoor Fourth of July concert in the country. Hosted by actor-comedian Kevin Hart and featuring homegrown house band The Roots, the exhibition will showcase sets from Jill Scott, J. Cole, Grace Potter, John Mayer, and Ne-Yo. The show was originally slated to feature Demi Lovato as well, but due to strep throat, she’s cancelled her appearance. Rising country star Hunter Hayes takes her place to round out the night’s performances.

Via EW.

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Rush Limbaugh to Leave AM Station in Philadelphia

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pics on Sodahead

A couple hours old, but I just felt like dancing on the porcine, prevaricating, pill popping pedophile's grave. (There were no p words that matched with impotence)

“The Rush Limbaugh Show” is leaving the dominant conservative talk radio station in Philadelphia, one of the biggest radio markets in the country.

In its place on the station, WPHT, will go “The Michael Smerconish Show,” hosted by Mr. Smerconish, a native of the city.

The move does not appear to be directly related to the recent ad boycott against Mr. Limbaugh, which was started after he repeatedly attacked Sandra Fluke, a Georgetown University law school student, on his three-hour show. Two of his roughly 600 affiliates dropped the show in the wake of those attacks.

Nonetheless, the move is likely to gain attention because Mr. Limbaugh’s show has been under scrutiny lately. On Monday, a new competitor, “The Mike Huckabee Show,” started broadcasting nationally in Mr. Limbaugh’s noon-to-3 p.m. time slot.

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Video- More than 200 arrested in Occupy LA raid; 50 in Philadelphia

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Yeah, right to... oh never mind.

LOS ANGELES » More than 1,400 police officers, some in riot gear, cleared the Occupy Los Angeles camp early Wednesday, driving protesters from a park around City Hall and arresting more than 200 who defied orders to leave. Similar raids in Philadelphia led to 50 arrests, but the scene in both cities was relatively peaceful.

Police in Los Angeles and Philadelphia moved in on Occupy Wall Street encampments under darkness in an effort to clear out some of the longest-lasting protest sites since crackdowns ended similar occupations across the country.

(snip)

Officers flooded down the steps of City Hall just after midnight and started dismantling the two-month-old camp two days after a deadline passed for campers to leave the park. Officers in helmets and wielding batons and guns with rubber bullets converged on the park from all directions with military precision and began making arrests after several orders were given to leave.

There were no injuries and no drugs or weapons were found during a search of the emptied camp, which was strewn with trash after the raid. City workers put up concrete barriers to wall off the park while it is restored. As of 5:10 a.m. PST, the park was clear of protesters, said LAPD officer Cleon Joseph.

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Video- President Obama at Moving America Forward Rally in Philadelphia

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