Archive for oil

Overnight: Life in a North Dakota Oil- and Gas Boomtown (BBC)

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This 'mini-documentary' (it's only 8:45) gives you an excellent overview of what life is like in the North Dakota oilfields in a short time. Be glad you don't live there.

"Men here are 100% worse...they're animals."

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Exxon-Mobil CEO Suing His Own Company To Stop Fracking -- At Least In His Neighborhood

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fracking

Whatever happened to "what's good for the goose is good for the gander?" For that answer you really shouldn't be asking ExxonMobil CEO Rex Tillerson. His company is invading the US with natural gas fracking operations -- the more the merrier. So how is it that he's just became the highest-profile anti-fracking activist in the world? He's now party to a lawsuit to stop fracking -- at least in his own neighborhood.

The CEO who made $46 million in salary last year is concerned that the fracking operation that's taking place in his multi-million dollar housing neighborhood - he has 86 acres so it's a large neighborhood - will lower the value of his home. And why would fracking bother Tyrannosaurus Rex? Well, the noise, the pollution and the traffic to name a few.

According to Credo Action:

Even though he is the CEO of one of the largest fracking companies in the world, Tillerson is suing to block a fracking development near his Texas horse ranch because it would create a "noise nuisance and traffic hazards."

Didn't he care when this was happening in other people's backyards?  Evidently not.  So this is only a case of me, me, me.  He only cares when it affects him.

So it might be with some great surprise that T-Rex Tillerson has joined a massive anti-fracking lawsuit -- essentially suing his own company. To tell you what's at stake here, enjoy this clip from Chris Hayes and anti-fracking documentary filmmaker Josh Fox:

The outcome of this and many similar lawsuits might not stop fracking from taking place -- but when you've got a deep-pocketed CEO like Tillerson and his bevy of high priced lawyers biting the same hand that feeds him, you realize there may be some good to come out of this -- in a trickle down sense. Maybe for once, trickle down policy will actually work for the good of the masses, not just the rich.

Here's hoping Exxon-Mobil takes it in the gas hole. And no lubricant will be necessary -- they've already dipped their probes in oil. I don't mean to be crude -- yes, a pun.

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Where's The Windfall For The US With The Keystone XL Pipeline?

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Keystone XL Map

Keystone XL Map

There's so much talk about the Keystone pipeline -- should it be built from our northern border, dissecting the country in half like the Mississippi River?

Well, that's a long route and any pipeline carrying any product has certain risks. The largest being the spills. But it also means jobs in the short run - a few years. And the number of workers being employed are generally in the construction and oil business. But how many jobs? That's hard to say. The 1,700-mile Keystone XL is estimated to employ somewhere in the vicinity of 20,000 people according to Politifact. They also say the actual number might be half of that, or even less.

But how many people will be potentially affected by a possible spill of this dirtiest of crude? Millions. So do a little math, actually very little, and you'll see that there's high risk and not so great a reward.

Okay, let's assume it gets built and then the flow of this dirty liquid goes off without a hitch. Just think of all the crude that we'll be refining and having for our own use.

SCREECH.

Our own use? Un-uh. It's not for consumption in the US. It's for exportation. And the receipts for those sales doesn't go to the US market. Oh, no. It goes to Canada, the "owners" of the dirty raw crude. We're just the risk-taking conduit.

We are NOT GUARANTEED a single drop of that US refined oil. Not one. We can be the highest bidder and keep the fuel here, but we face competition from all over the world.

So we get to take the risk, we do get to spike a bit of employment -- but 20,000 jobs doesn't seem to be a huge comfort compared to the millions looking for work. It's better than nothing -- if you don't take into consideration that oil pipelines leak all the time. We're facing the disaster of all times if we're not lucky. And for what? For Canada to reap the profits for a drop in the bucket for us?

Truth is we're already showing an abundance of fuel here in this country. So much so that we're growing the exports of our domestic fuel every year. That means we producing more than we're selling here in the states. CNN Money Reports:

In 2008 the country exported 1.8 million barrels a day of refined products, according to EIA. By 2012 that number jumped to 3.2 million barrels.

Does it make sense to put our country at risk over the dirtiest oil we can find when we're refining enough of it here to have excess and making a profit selling it. Do we really need to build a pipeline when we have roads that are falling apart, bridges crumbling and airports that are referred to as "third world" quality? Wouldn't we make more money here with an improved infrastructure which wouldn't add nearly the risks of the dirty oil flowing dissecting our county? It used to be we lived east or west of the Mississippi. Soon it could be do you live east or west of the Keystone oil disaster.

leaky oil pipeline

The pipeline might be worth it -- but to Canada, not us. We shoulder the risk and they take all the profit. The honchos there say they're going to continue to frack and pull up their dirty shale oil. Good for them. They have ports on both of their coasts. If they need to refine their dirty oil, let them build refineries and pollute their air, not ours. Maybe they'll even hire some Americans to go up north and help them learn how refineries work.

Let Canada build their own pipelines to them and use tankers like everyone else. Why do we have to take the risk of catastrophe for a temporary, two year building gain? After it's done, we'll have an eternity of potential danger to humans, wildlife and our native lands. And for nothing but Canadians making profits.

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Friday Links

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Photos Charles Koch: Bo Rader/ZUMA; David Koch: Sonia Moskowitz/ZUMA / motherjones.com

Photos Charles Koch: Bo Rader/ZUMA; David Koch: Sonia Moskowitz/ZUMA / motherjones.com

The Koch Brothers Left a Confidential Document at Their Last Donor Conference

Anti-Government Militia Threatens To Kidnap Montana Judge - Calls It A "Citizens Arrest"

Sen Jay Rockefeller Slams Capitalism, Tells Stunning Truth

Fracking is depleting water supplies in America's driest areas, report shows

A Cowboy Fights to Protect the Wilderness, and Our Nation’s Wild Horses

Washington Post unearths Chris Christie's '94 political ad that caused a defamation lawsuit.

Unconstitutional & Unintimidated in Wisconsin!

Joe Biden and the Corvette: A Love Story

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Keystone XL ? 'Yes, it would impact the climate' says State Dept.

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Photo: ecowatch.com

Photo: ecowatch.com

State Dept. Admits Keystone XL Pipeline Climate Change Impact (via Environment News Service)

WASHINGTON, DC, January 31, 2014 (ENS) – In its final environmental review of TransCanada’s proposed Keystone XL pipeline, the U.S. State Department today acknowledges for the first time that the pipeline could “significantly impact” climate…


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He's Doing Time For Us

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Tim DeChristopher

Who is Bidder 70 and what does he have to do with us? He's Tim DeChristopher and he is us. He's an American who's gone to jail because big oil didn't like that he was threatening them -- by attending and bidding in open to the public auctions of government land, beautiful and pristine. And he was doing it to save that pastoral beauty for generations to come, the keep it free from oil rigs and fracking.

On December 19, 2008 Tim DeChristopher attended a highly Utah BLM Oil and Gas lease auction. Tim entered the auction hall and registered as bidder #70. He outbid industry giants on land parcels (which, starting at $2 an acre, were adjacent to national treasures like Canyonlands National Park), winning 22,000 acres of land worth $1.7 million before the auction was halted.

chesler_park_trail_canyonlands_national_park_utah_us

Within two months Interior Secretary Ken Salazar invalidated the auction. He had just been sworn in and this was one of his first actions. Think he got some lobbyist money? Probably. But what DeChristopher got  was indicted on two federal felonies with penalties of up to 10 years in prison and $750,000 in fines.

After two years and nine postponements, his trial began on February 28, 2011. Outside the courtroom, hundreds rallied in solidarity with Tim. Inside, Judge Dee Benson disallowed every defense his lawyers put forth. After a five-day trial, DeChristopher was found guilty. His sentencing was scheduled for summer 2012.

On July 26th Tim was sentenced to two years in federal prison and removed immediately from court in chains.

Tim is serving the remainder of his sentence.

He did this for all of us. Why not take a look at the video trailer and see how our government is in bed with big oil and are out to crush anyone who gets in their way. We need to hold both the government AND big oil to blame for this. Get ready to become inflamed.

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Video Overnight Thread- Coffee Powered Car

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Via.

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