Archive for night

The Book Booth: Summer Wind Edition

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Image: Huffington Post

The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing.  It is written by @SeattleDan and SeattleTammy, operators of an on-line bookstore (which you can find here) , who have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

The Book Booth: Summer Wind Edition

We hope everyone had a good 4th of July celebration this past week. Our cats did not particularly enjoy the festivities, but have survived it by taking some extra naps and begging for more scritches.

We enjoyed some good weather for the holiday, and although we didn't exactly garden, we at least thought about it and admired the yard. The cherries are out and the apples are getting plump. And we do have tomato plants to get into the ground. And for those of us who enjoy books that feature gardens, check out some suggested novels centered on gardens from HuffPo.
Literary Gardens

I believe that William Shakespeare indeed wrote the plays and poems long attributed to him. To contend that other, more highly educated noblemen authored his works has always smacked of an elitist worldview. Now, it seems, that with the discovery of documents showing the Bard's attempts to obtain a coat of arms in the late 1590's show, help show that Shakespeare the player was also Shakespeare the playwright.
Shakespeare the Player, Playwright, & Would-Be Nobelman!

We note the passing of Elie Wiesel at age 87. His Night has become classic in holocaust literature. May we always remember.
Elie Wiesel Has Left Us

And from the good folks at FSG's Work in Progress, an excerpt from Night.

Cynthia Ozick is, at age 88, still very much with us as a public intellectual and novelist and has recently published a new work of criticism. Here the New York Times Magazine profiles her career and current life.
NYT Profile of Cynthia Ozick

In the above profile, Ozick gives an appreciation of novelist Franz Kafka, from whom we get the notion of Kafkaesque as a condition of modern life. Here, from Open Culture, is a short animated feature which tells us what that is really all about.
Kafkaesque?  Much of Modern Life Still Is

I have no particular insight into the hows and whys some novels get adapted into movies and others do not. But this article by Shawn Taylor of Fusion gives us an ardent plea to adapt the novels of Octavia Butler to the silver screen. If Jules Verne can have 140 films made from his work, why hasn't anyone looked at the cinematic possibilities of the late Butler?
Octavia Butler On The Big Screen?

I've liked the idea of the Free Little Libraries that have cropped up around the country. Our little local Art Gallery has one and it seems to be well-used and loved. However that doesn't seem to be the experience of Dan Greenstone who relates his story about his here for Salon. H/ T to Lucian for sharing this link with me.
How The Little Free Library Made Me Hate Books and Fear My Neighbors

Here's hoping your summer is going well.

Please enjoy this lovely version of The Summer Wind by Madeline Peyroux, and by all means let us know what great books are filling up your days.
Madeline Peyroux

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Video Mid Day Distraction- Illuminating Nasa video of the Earth at night

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Video Astronomy Overnight Thread- Time Lapse Night Skies

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Via Mr Sullivan.

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