Archive for moon

Video Astronomy Overnight Thread- Rotating Moon

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Rotating Moon from LRO
Credit: LRO, Arizona State U., NASA
Explanation: No one, presently, sees the Moon rotate like this. That's because the Earth's moon is tidally locked to the Earth, showing us only one side. Given modern digital technology, however, combined with many detailed images returned by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), a high resolution virtual Moon rotation movie has now been composed. The above time-lapse video starts with the standard Earth view of the Moon. Quickly, though, Mare Orientale, a large crater with a dark center that is difficult to see from the Earth, rotates into view just below the equator. From an entire lunar month condensed into 24 seconds, the video clearly shows that the Earth side of the Moon contains an abundance of dark lunar maria, while the lunar far side is dominated by bright lunar highlands. Two new missions are scheduled to begin exploring the Moon within the year, the first of which is NASA's Lunar Atmosphere and Dust Environment Explorer (LADEE).

 

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Astronomy Overnight Thread- Moon Over Andromeda

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Moon Over Andromeda
Image Credit & Copyright: Adam Block and Tim Puckett
Explanation: The Great Spiral Galaxy in Andromeda (aka M31), a mere 2.5 million light-years distant, is the closest large spiral to our own Milky Way. Andromeda is visible to the unaided eye as a small, faint, fuzzy patch, but because its surface brightness is so low, casual skygazers can't appreciate the galaxy's impressive extent in planet Earth's sky. This entertaining composite image compares the angular size of the nearby galaxy to a brighter, more familiar celestial sight. In it, a deep exposure of Andromeda, tracing beautiful blue star clusters in spiral arms far beyond the bright yellow core, is combined with a typical view of a nearly full Moon.

 

Click photo to enlarge.

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Astronomy Overnight Thread- The Moon from Zond 8

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The Moon from Zond 8
Image Credit & Copyright: Galspace
Explanation: Which moon is this? Earth's. Our Moon's unfamiliar appearance is due partly to an unfamiliar viewing angle as captured by a little-known spacecraft -- the Soviet Union's Zond 8 that circled the Moon in October of 1970. Pictured above, the dark-centered circular feature that stands out near the top of the image is Mare Orientale, a massive impact basin formed by an ancient collision with an asteroid. Mare Orientale is surrounded by light colored and highly textured highlands. Across the image bottom lies the dark and expansive Oceanus Procellarum, the largest of the dark (but dry) maria that dominate the side of the Moon that always faces toward the Earth. Originally designed to carry humans, robotic Zond 8 came within 1000 km of the lunar surface, took about 100 detailed photographs on film, and returned them safely to Earth within a week.

 

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Video Overnight Thread- What is a SuperMoon?

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Live Streaming Video- Supermoon Webcast by Slooh Space Camera 9:00p EDT

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over

Too cool for school. Via.

During Slooh's Sunday webcast, the website will provide live views of the moon from remotely operated telescopes at its Canary Islands observatory. You can follow the webcast live on SPACE.com, or directly from the Slooh Space Camera website, or the Slooh iPad App.

Astronomer Bob Berman of Astronomy Magazine will provide commentary alongside Slooh's webcast team for Sunday's event.

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VIDEO: What the frack? Pennsylvania "butt-naked worker greets" citizen journo

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what the frack sign Via The Tyee.ca

worker mooning citizen journo

 

Yesterday I posted: VIDEO- #Keystone tar sands pipeline’s toxicity gets personal: “One of them just stood and urinated facing my house.”

Lovely.

In that post I included some reporting by Public Citizen. Citizen journalism in general is more important than ever these days, considering the budget cuts, bias, laziness, and ineptitude of some of the corporate media.

So when a citizen journalist and advocate for clean water, like Vera Scroggins for instance, does actual footwork on a story that the so-called "pros" won't touch, she is subjected to moments like this:

tweet citizen journo
Vera Scroggins Vera Scroggins:

Taped 5-30-13. This is the Mt. Valley Rd., Williams Compressor Station being built in Liberty Twp., Susquehanna County, Pa.. I was taping on the road and this worker decided to flash me with his butt for some reason !!

@BleuZ00m tweeted:

#Frackenbutthead

#Frackenweenie

#Whatthefrack

H/t: @BleuZ00m

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Video Astronomy Overnight Thread- Total solar eclipse delights Australians

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