Archive for march madness

Time for Another Stand-Up Political Comedy Blog

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comedy3 laugh jokes political comedy"Last Blog Standing" starts riiight....now!

Yes, it's time to steal a few more jokes from my father-in-law (F.I.L.). His posts range from political comedy to humorous commentary on pop culture.

For those of you who might be new here, he used to write for Alan King, Milton Berle and Jonathan Winters, just to name a few. And all those Dean Martin Roasts,  too: Don Rickles, Red Buttons, Phyllis Diller, Sammy Davis, Jr., etc.

A tiny respite from all the frustrating events of the day:

Vice President BIDEN said this week that the U.S. is considering sending troops to Estonia, Latvia and Lithuania. It's bad enough that PUTIN took over the Crimea. We don't want to wake up one morning and find out that "Russia has us by the Baltics."

PUTIN'S approval rating has actually gone up 10 percent since he sent troops into the Crimea. When he heard, PRESIDENT OBAMA just shrugged and ordered troops to invade Canada.

VLADIMIR PUTIN signed a treaty that formally absorbs Crimea into the Russian Federation. I'm so frustrated. Just when I found out where the Crimea was, it's gone.

PUTIN said he can do this because of a little known rule in the U.N. Security Council. It is Article 5, section 3, clause 12 that states, "Finders keepers."

"March Madness" has tipped off this week and PRESIDENT OBAMA picked Florida, Arizona, Louisville and Michigan State to make it to the final four, with Michigan State beating Louisville to win the tournament. In response, VLADIMIR PUTIN started moving troops into Gonzaga.

Surprisingly, "March Madness" isn't that big a deal with CHARLIE SHEEN. Maybe it's because he'll have "April Madness," "May Madness"... and it'll go on right to the end of the year.

Two million people turned out for New York City's annual St. Patrick's Day Parade and at least half of them had been drinking since dawn. It's the one parade where the horses are the ones who have to watch where they step.

KOBE BRYANT told ESPN that he thinks even PRESIDENT OBAMA could make the Lakers' roster this year. He runs well, we've all seen him as a candidate. He's a straight shooter. too straight when it comes to negotiating with Republicans. Only one problem, he can't seem to pass anything.

Republican National Committee Chairman REINCE PRIEBUS said that the 2014 midterms will be a victory for Republicans thanks to Obamacare. Coincidentally, the name, REINCE PRIEBUS, sounds like something that can be cured with penicillin and is probably covered under Obamacare.

Tax season is once again upon us. It's a time when the government "OF the people, FOR the people and BY the people," stick it "TO the people."

Between the Federal, State and City my income has been taxed so often it has stretch marks.

This year I don't have to use H&R BLOCK because I'm H&R Broke.

It's also that time of the year, Spring Break time, when thousands of students will be heading to beaches and resorts to drink, do drugs and have sex. It's the only time in Ft. Lauderdale, Florida when condoms out sell "Depends."

Then they'll return to school and it's back to the same old grind - To drink, do drugs and have sex.

Los Angeles had an earthquake this week that registered 4.4 on the Richter Scale. To refresh everyone on the meaning of Richter Scale numbers. 3.2 means you'll need to get new glassware, 4.7 you'll need new cups and saucers and an 8.6 means you'll need to get new underwear.

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Cartoons of the Day- GOP March Madness

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gopmarch

"A Lot To Swallow" (Mark Streeter/Savannah Morning News)

Clay Bennett editorial cartoon

Via.

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Supreme Court to hear marriage equality cases in late March

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March madness

Let's hope this is a March to progress. Here's the latest on when the Supreme Court will be hearing oral arguments on the marriage equality cases, via NBC:

On Tuesday, March 26, it will take up the fight over California's Proposition 8, which banned same-sex marriage in the state.

The next day, Wednesday, March 27, it will hear the challenge to the federal Defense of Marriage Act, which bars the federal government from recognizing same-sex marriages in the states where they're legal.

Here's to equality and respect for all Americans.

marriage equality gay wedding Washington

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The Book Booth: Tax Edition

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The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore, as well a brick and mortar in small town Washington State. Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

Well it is tax time, and if you are like me, you have procrastinated to the last minute. As you read this, I am crunching numbers. Lots of numbers. Mind-numbing numbers.

Sheer numbers cannot convey the vastness of the Universe. However some of these writers can with words. Here are this year Hugo Award nominees, by way of our friends at Publishers Weekly.

This weeks quiz is fun. Can you tell the difference between James Joyce and Kook Keith? I only got five of these correctly.

IndieBound highlights every month the picks from Independent Bookstores. Here are April's picks, from booksellers across the country.


Here's a neat feature from Poets and Writers and a must for the literary traveler.

I love the smell of old books. The odors are my madelaine cake, conjuring memories and emotions. An article from Huffington Post examines the science of old book aromas.

I am a chronic re-reader. Some books cannot be digested in one reading. Others beg for renewal. I make no apologies for this at all. Does one only look at the Mona Lisa once? Don't folks watch their favorite movies over and over again? Tom Lamont of the Guardian explores the pleasures of re-reading here.

Little Brown Publishers has released details and pricing for the new J.K. Rowling book. It will be released on September 27th and cost $35.00. Rowling has written a "darkly comic" novel for adults, about life and strife in a small English town and titled The Casual Vacancy. It appears there will be no teenage wizards, nor does it have any vampires or dystopic futures.

Finally, The New York Times had a fun interview with humorist David Sedaris. I share his enthusiasm for Flannery O'Connor, and think he is very wrong about Moby Dick. But you can find out what book is on his nightstand.

A good weekend to all The Political Carnival readers. And just what is on your nightstand?

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The Book Booth: Opening Day‏

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The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore, as well a brick and mortar in small town Washington State. Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

Tis April, a time when a young man's fancy turns to.....Baseball! The season has started and I hope your favorite team goes all the way this year! But only to be defeated by the mighty Seattle Mariners. Well, maybe not.

It is April and though Eliot may have maintained it is the cruelest month, it is also National Poetry Month. You can read all about it, including poems, activities and all things poetical here. This is a good resource all year long.

One of my favorite novels is Don DeLillo's Underworld, which, speaking of baseball, begins brilliantly with a montage of activity surrounding the old Polo Grounds on the day Bobby Thompson hit the home run that defeated my beloved Dodgers in the 1951 playoff series. Here, courtesy of our friends at Publishers Weekly, is a pie chart diagram of the novel.

The PBS series, American Masters, recently featured both Margaret Mitchell and Harper Lee. I have to admit that I am not a fan of Gone with the Wind, but Mitchell certainly had personality.

And this year marks the 50th anniversary of the release of the film version of To Kill a Mockingbird. Both the movie and the book are very worthwhile to revist.

The USA cable network will air a restored print of the movie tonight with thoughts from President Obama.

And in the Cool Department this week, check out these photographs from Joel Robison. He likes books.

We all know the opening lines to many novels. Call Me Ishmael. Marley was dead. Everyone has a favorite. Again, courtesy of Publishers Weekly, comes this blog of closing lines. Some of these are quite lovely.

I am currently reading Lee Child's The Hard Way. It has taken me some years to finally getting around to reading the Jack Reacher series, although I have been urged by many, including SeattleTammy, to do so. And I am so glad that I have started. Great stuff. A film version of One Shot, and amid some controversy with the casting of Tom Cruise as Reacher, the film seems to have Child's blessing.

So what's on your nightstand?

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The Book Booth: The Final Four

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The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore, as well a brick and mortar in small town Washington State. Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

Running a retail operation has its moments. I've often thought we were like literary bartenders. For whatever reason, people open up in bookstores,and we hear the stories of many of our customer's lives. Elizabeth Anderson of Charis Books and More agrees.

As a young boy, I loved comics. Superman. Batman. Green Arrow (who was really a blond Batman in a Robin Hood outfit). Wonder Woman. But I also devoured the adapted novels from Comics Illustrated. ABE Books had a nice article on the publisher with many covers that brought back memories.

Not all literary classics are published by the Big Publishers. James Joyce's Ulysses was originally published by bookseller Sylvia Beach in a Shakespeare and Company edition. Here is a nice list of current novels that come from small presses with lovely cover art.

Literature has inspired song writers for many years. Both Woody Guthrie and Bruce Springsteen wrote great songs about The Grapes of Wrath. Kate Bush's Wuthering Heights pretty much tells the story in a four minute song. So check out the Flavorwire list of songs inspired by famous writers.

I have to admit that I don't watch much television. But this article from The Telegraph makes Mad Men. which has returned to the airwaves, seem very interesting with evocations of Richard Yates and John Cheever.

Alas, we note the passing of the fine poet Adrienne Rich this week.

The Hunger Games, of course, is not the first novel to use dystopian setting. George Orwell's classic 1984 is probably the best-known, if not the best, of the genre. It has also been filmed on two occasions, once in the fifties and starring Edmund O'Brien and Michael Redgrave, and then again in the eighties with John Hurt and Richard Burton. It seems it will come to the screen once again, with Ron Howard involved in the production.

Finally, I really like this article from the Atlantic. We do need a slow-books movement. Can you spare a half-hour a day?

Enjoy your weekend! And what is on your nightstand?

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The Book Booth: March Madness

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Margaret Baxter (News & Record)

The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore, as well a brick and mortar in small town Washington State. Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

Not only are Basketball tournaments being played around the country this weekend, there also seems to be a big movie opening! The film adaptation of Suzanne Collins' The Hunger Games is coming to a theatre or drive-in near you. The novel is the first in a trilogy and concerns teen-agers confronting a post-apocalyptic and dystopian future United States where all is not well. The plot reminds me somewhat of The Running Man, the Stephen King novella and movie starring the Arnold and Richard Dawson, neither of whom, I'm assured, appear in this movie. Salon reported on the making of the movie here.

And it has actually garnered some good notices. Let us know how you liked it, if you braved the long lines at the Cineplex.

It seems the Beats remain big in Hollywood circles. I've noted the past couple of weeks the impending release of the film version of Jack Kerouac's On the Road. It seems that another film, Kill Your Darlings, is also in production and features Daniel Radcliffe as the young Allen Ginsberg. The movie is about Ginsberg, Kerouac and their friend, Lucien Carr (who is probably best known now as the father of novelist Caleb Carr) during their years in and around Columbia University. I like the casting of Radcliffe.

If your book tastes sometimes are steered towards the naughty, and you've exhausted Anne Rice's earlier erotica, this might pique your interest. If you can find it.

You might find it at one of these fine independent bookstores in North America, as featured by the British GlobeandMail. Some very good bookstores here, though, sadly, our little place went unnoticed.

This week's literary quiz from flavorwire is not easy. Can you identify these authors from their distinctive styles? I have to admit, I had trouble with this one.

James Beard was one of those writers who made food sound delicious on the page and made readers drool. I cant recommend his writings enough. So it is always interesting to see what books the James Beard Foundation comes up with as nominees for best cookbooks are.

Both SeattleTammy and I like to play and socialize in the virtual world of Second Life, especially at a little establishment we call Cafe Wellstone. The following comes from one of our good friends there, Nakaima Oh, who we thank for sharing it with us. If you feel dispirited about modern culture, watch this video; but watch it all the way through for the payoff. It is worth it.

Enjoy your weekend! What books are on your nightstand?

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