Archive for hunger

Cartoons of the Day- Christmas Time Is Here!

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Dave Granlund

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Jimmy Margulies

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Charlie Daniel

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Video- NBC Political Editor: We Don't Have a Clue About Key Issues for 2014

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Thank god Heather caught this. Stunningly ignorant. NOTE- Vid isn't working here, but it does at C&L.

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"Yes, Virginia, there are children in need"

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poverty cartoon Bob Englehart Hartford Courant smaller

Children are suffering, living in poverty and thanks to that wonderful thing called "sequestration," they're having their education opportunities and health care cut while tax rates remain nice and low for the rich. Aren't wealth gaps wonderful? Hey! That's the American way!

As Michael Petit (executive director of Every Child Matters, which launched Strong Kids, Strong Virginia... www.strongkidsstrongvirginia.com) put it, Yes, Virginia, there are children in need:

Nationwide, 16.4 million children, or 23 percent, were in families living in poverty in 2011, an increase from 15.7 million ... This was on top of the finding in 2012 that the number of children living in poverty had increased by nearly 33 percent from 2000 to 2010.

How has Virginia fared? According to data from the Census Bureau, the “deep poverty” rate jumped by more than 20 percent [...]

To put it in human terms, hundreds of thousands of Virginia children go to sleep hungry, don’t get the medical care they need or are inadequately supervised while parents work. For many of these children, poverty is so disruptive that a basic education is often not possible because of frequent moves or because they attend underfunded schools that place them squarely at educational risk. [...]

[H]ow we treat the most vulnerable among us says a lot about who we are as a people, and where we see this great commonwealth and country heading in the future.

Please read his entire column here.

From what I heard from President Obama in Tennessee just now, he and Petit clearly agree. No child should go without an education, or go to bed hungry, or be deprived of food and health care. Ever. Right "pro-lifers"?

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VIDEO: #Guantanamo Bay hunger strike force feeding protest #FreeFayiz

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barry wingard RT tv gitmo hunger strike

Jacob Dean of Filter Free Radio is a longtime pal o' mine from various shows we have in common on the Radio Machine. He's a very young, very cool guy who knows a lot about a lot and speaks his mind.

On Wednesday June 26, 2013 the United International Day in Support of Victims of Torture, Jacob volunteered to be strapped down and "force-fed" to lend his body in support of the total eradication of torture and the effective functioning of the Convention Against Torture and other cruel, inhuman, or degrading treatment or punishment.

In the words of Portland's hunger striker S. Brian Willson, "We are not worth more. They are not worth less."

Recorded 4-6pm on June 26, 2013 at Portland City Hall. (This is NOT actually torture, just political street theater.):

Jacob Dean interviews 71 year-old S. Brian Willson, Activist, Author, a Vietnam veteran member of Veterans For Peace, Portland Chapter 72, beginning Sunday, May 12 reduced his food intake by more than 85 percent, fasting on 300 calories a day in solidarity with the 130 uncharged Guantanamo prisoner hunger strikers now in deteriorating health, many of whom are being force-fed. Willson, a trained lawyer and criminologist, anti-war activist and author, lives by the mantra: "We are not worth more; They are not worth less."

He joins 65-year-old grandmother Diane Wilson, a fifth-generation Texas shrimper, anti-war activist and author, who began an open-ended, water-only fast on May 1 outside the White House, and intends to fast until the prisoners are freed.

There are more than 1,200 people around the country participating in a rolling hunger strike to bring attention to the plight of the fasting prisoners at Guantanamo, who have been illegally detained for over ten years with little recourse. May 16 [was] the 100th day of the hunger strike.

The hunger strike/fast demands President Obama take immediate action to close the prison and release the prisoners. Interview recorded 6/22/2013

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here; That link includes one specific to only Fayiz al-Kandari’s story here.

Here are audio and video interviews with Lt. Col. Wingard, one by David Shuster, one by Ana Marie Cox, and more. My guest commentary at BuzzFlash is here.

Lt. Col. Barry Wingard is a military attorney who represents Fayiz Al-Kandari in the Military Commission process and in no way represents the opinions of his home state. When not on active duty, Colonel Wingard is a public defender in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

Please read Jane Mayer’s book The Dark Side. You’ll have a much greater understanding of why I post endlessly about this, and why I’m all over the CIA deception issues, too.

More of Fayiz’s story here, at Answers.com.

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What I will not write about today

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frustrated27

Sometimes I get so frustrated and/or disheartened and/or annoyed by some of the news stories of the day that I can’t bring myself to write about them. Here are a few recent reports that made my blood pressure hit the roof. I am avoiding delving into them at length out of concern for my physical and mental health.

  • Killing Obamacare by Making it Fail-- When failed attempts at repeal just won't cut it: Now the GOP is trying to prevent the insurance exchanges from working. USA! USA! See how they care about the health and welfare of all Americans?

See what I mean? So who’s up for a couple of Margs or a trough of wine?

drunk wine lady glasses

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"The average food stamp benefit is a little more than $4 a day, about what one pays for a latte at Starbucks."

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inequality income

Today's Los Angeles Times letter to the editor, because our voices matter:

Re "The case for food stamps," Opinion, May 24

The proposed reductions to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (also known as food stamps) are more evidence of the inequality between rich and poor in the United States. There are some 50 million Americans who are "food insecure," including roughly 17 million children, according to the charity Feeding America.

The cuts are more than an economic misstep — they are a moral failing.

The average food stamp benefit is a little more than $4 a day, about what one pays for a latte at Starbucks. We are a country of enormous wealth that would deny nutrition to the least affluent, even though studies tell us that hunger denies children the ability to learn at a time when an educated citizenry is essential in a global economy.

Our Constitution was adopted specifically, in part, to "promote the general welfare." Enacting these cuts would mock the idea of mutual obligations in a free and just society.

Barbara H. Bergen

Los Angeles

will work for latte

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"This seems to be exactly what our founders abhorred."

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gitmo prisoner usa

Today's L.A. Times letters to the editor, because our voices matter:

Re "Obama's Gitmo woes," Opinion, May 5

As a fan of Doyle McManus, I was disappointed to read his claim that most of the detainees being held at Guantanamo Bay were anti-American extremists when they were apprehended.

Our own government has acknowledged that many of these men were simply in the wrong place at the wrong time, near the Afghanistan-Pakistan border when the war started in 2001. They are guilty of nothing.

I also note with dismay the remarks of Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.), who said that the Guantanamo prisoners were "hell-bent on destroying our way of life." Graham and his fellow Republicans in the Senate, who have supported the gutting of the Constitution under the guise of fighting terrorism, have been much more effective in that regard than the innocent men who languish in Cuba.

Jon Krampner

Los Angeles

***

McManus and other commentators have noted the conflict between American values and the indefinite detention without trial of those deemed "enemy combatants." It is hard for me to imagine any action more obviously in violation of our Constitution than this.

Indeed, this seems to be exactly what our founders abhorred.

Obviously, some detainees hate us and will actively seek to attack us if released. But keeping them imprisoned, especially in clear disregard of our own laws and values, serves to recruit an unknown number of like-minded individuals.

On balance, won't we be safer if we let them loose? There will be fewer of them to plot against us, and we'll know who they are and be able to monitor them.

Randall Gellens

San Diego

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here; That link includes one specific to only *Fayiz al-Kandari’s story here.

Here are audio and video interviews with Lt. Col. Wingard, one by David Shuster, one by Ana Marie Cox, and more. My guest commentary at BuzzFlash is here.

Lt. Col. Barry Wingard is a military attorney who represents Fayiz Al-Kandari in the Military Commission process and in no way represents the opinions of his home state. When not on active duty, Colonel Wingard is a public defender in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

If you’d like to see ways you can take action, go here and scroll down to the end of the article.

Then read Jane Mayer’s book The Dark Side. You’ll have a much greater understanding of why I post endlessly about this, and why I’m all over the CIA deception issues, too.

More of Fayiz’s story here, at Answers.com.

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