Archive for Hollywood

Mickey Rooney Dies at the Age of 93

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

Rooney

From the BBC

Hollywood legend Mickey Rooney dies aged 93

Mickey Rooney, the child actor who became the world's top box-office star, has died aged 93, US police say.

Born in Brooklyn, he began his career aged 18 months in his parents' vaudeville act, Yule and Carter, and never really retired.

By 1965, Mickey Rooney's 200 films had earned more than $3bn (£1.8bn) around the world.

Sir Laurence Olivier once referred to him as the greatest film actor America ever produced.

From Wikipedia:

Mickey Rooney (bornJoseph Yule, Jr.; September 23, 1920 – April 6, 2014) was an American film actor and entertainer whose film, television, and stage appearances spanned nearly his entire lifetime.

He received multiple awards, including a Juvenile Academy Award, an HonoraryAcademy Award, two Golden Globesand an Emmy Award.

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

Overnight: Life After Pi : Visual Effects in Hollywood

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

Visual EffectsLife After Pi : Visual Effects in Hollywood

The Life of Pi was an enormously successful movie, created (as a movie) almost entirely with special effects from all over the world but many created right in Hollywood by the Visual Effects ('VFX') company 'Rhythm and Hues'. Rhythm and Hues was not a profit participant in its success and closed its doors soon after receiving an Oscar.

Here's the whole story on YouTube from hollywoodendingmovie.com/

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

Tuesday Links

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare
links

Drought in Australia

Is Drought Becoming the New Normal for Australia?

Arizona Senate Actually Does It: Turn Gays Away Passes

Washington Lobbyist Pushes Bill Banning Gays from the NFL

The real monuments men: History trumps Hollywood

At 4.4 Billion Years Old, Oz Crystals Confirmed As World's Oldest

Tea Party candidate mocks fatal gunshot victims on Facebook, because we all know how funny that is

Oakland Artist Crafts Homes for Those Who Have None

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

Monday Links

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

Photos: Sochi Olympics day 15 highlights

Has the US Alpine ski team embraced ageism?

Syrian refugee children forced to work to support families in Lebanon

The $11 Billion Year
From Sundance to the Oscars, an Inside Look at the Changing Hollywood System

Angry crowd runs George Zimmerman out of Miami

Walker Aide Dismissed 'Crazy' Woman Who Starved In Mental Health Facility

13 Ways Europe Does Food Safer, Cleaner, and Kinder

Can You Walk On Water?

Watch what happens when the Tea Party takes over a school board. Warning: It gets ugly

Wes Anderson: In A World Of His Own

Watch This Fish Drive A Tiny Car (Really!)

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

Shirley Temple Black Dies at 85

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare
Photo: fanpop.com

Photo: fanpop.com

(CNN) -- Shirley Temple Black, who rose to fame as arguably the most popular child star in Hollywood history, died late Monday night, her publicist said.
She was 85.
Temple Black, who also enjoyed a long career as a diplomat, died of natural causes at her Woodside, California, home. She was surrounded by family and caregivers, a statement from Cheryl Kagan said.
She began acting at age 3 and became a massive box-office draw before turning 10, commanding a then-unheard of salary of $50,000 per movie.

Here's more from CNN

The Little Princess: Shirley Temple - the Beginning

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

Video- 2013 Golden Globes: Tina Fey and Amy Poehler Full Monologue

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

GOP consultant Frank Luntz "can't get his calls returned"

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

blame Obama 2

GOP consultant, pollster, strategist, and attack dog Frank Luntz is "profoundly depressed." Now he knows how we feel after listening to his "re-framing" blather all these years. But I digress.

He's down and out because his side lost in 2012, and "there's nothing [he] can do about it." Thankfully.

Actually, he did make one good point, opining that, as The Atlantic put it, Americans "didn't listen to each other as they once had. They weren't interested in hearing other points of view. They were divided one against the other, black vs. white, men vs. women, young vs. old, rich vs. poor."

Hmm, now how did that happen?

Black vs. white: Did GOP voter suppression aid and abet?

Men vs. women: Did shutting down women's health service providers and forcing trans-vaginal ultrasounds aid and abet?

Rich vs. poor: Did attempts to kill Medicare, Medicaid, and Social Security aid and abet? Did corporate "people" hoard their profits, fail to hire, and lie, cheat, and steal?

Did political shock jocks and Fox propagandists have anything to do with this sad state of affairs? Did the GOP priority to do in President Obama contribute just the teensiest bit to the bitter divides? Did all that GOP obstruction impede progress and communication? How about those raucous-bordering-on-violent health care reform town hall disruptions? And the anti-abortion extremists stalking and threatening clinics and their staffs culminating in the assassination of Dr. George Tiller? And Republicans either giving tacit approval of such activities via their silence or outright support while appearing on the so-called "liberal media"?

Any of that ring a bell, Frank? Any of that contribute to the "divide against each other" attitude you so ironically lament?

Granted, Luntz does acknowledge that he helped create this toxic atmosphere, and now *sniffle* he haz a sad, and yet...

... he blames Obama. Yesireebob, he said that.

See for yourself, via The Atlantic's "The Agony of Frank Luntz" (All together now, "Awww!"):

[H]e fell apart. Leaving his employees behind, he flew back to his mansion in Los Angeles, where he stayed for three weeks, barely going outside or talking to anyone.

"I just gave up," Luntz says. [...]

But it was Obama he principally blamed. The people in his focus groups, he perceived, had absorbed the president's message of class divisions, haves and have-nots, of redistribution. It was a message Luntz believed to be profoundly wrong, but one so powerful he had no slogans, no arguments with which to beat it back. In reelecting Obama, the people had spoken. And the people, he believed, were wrong.

Now he moans about just not being good enough to make a difference any more.

whining wah wambulance

He's *heavy sigh* ever so distraught about all those people yelling at each other, the ones he, you know, encouraged to yell at each other. And he manages to include a whole lot of Luntzisms (read: talking points) while expressing his grief. And he helped create a monster, then emerged from his lucrative bubble long enough to notice the damaging consequences, and, ta-daa! blamed the president. Got it. Perfect. True to form.

The fruits of all his messaging efforts? Well, nowadays, he's contract free:

He still advises his friends here and there, but he no longer has any ongoing political contracts. (Corporations and television networks, not politicians, are his main sources of income.) [...]

Luntz would also like to break into Hollywood as a consultant, but he can't get his calls returned. He can't figure it out. He thinks it must be a partisan thing. In every other industry, he says, 90 percent of his presentations result in a contract. But in entertainment, he pitches and pitches and pitches (he wouldn't tell me which studios or shows) and things seem to go well, but then there's some excuse. Not this time. Not the right project.

Get a clue, Frank. Not the right fit. Not the right talent. Not the right appeal. Not the right person. Not even close. Not this time, not any time.

don't call us we'll call you

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare