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Young voters now much more solidly Democratic than prior generations

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young voters Democrats

The more important question is, how do we get young voters to the polls to actually, you know, vote?

gallup young voters Democrats

Gallup:

Young adults -- those between the ages of 18 and 29 -- have typically aligned themselves with the Democratic Party, but they have become substantially more likely to do so since 2006. [...]

Recent decades have brought significant shifts in Americans' political allegiances, in the short term and the long term. While young adults have generally been more likely to align themselves with the Democratic Party than the Republican Party, they are now much more solidly Democratic than prior generations of young adults.

To a large extent, this reflects the increasing racial and ethnic diversity of the U.S. population, particularly among the youngest generations of Americans. And that growing diversity creates challenges for the Republican Party, given nonwhites' consistent and strong support for the Democratic Party.

Here's an idea, Republicans: If you want to attract the youth vote, try kicking bigots, racists, misogynists, birthers, and other loons out of your party. Then support immigration, public education, Obamacare, women's rights, voting rights, and civil rights. And instead of redistricting in order to win votes, earn them.

In other words, begin to open what's left of your minds and turn that fake outreach effort into reality.

What am I nuts? Look who I'm talking to here.

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Bikini Graph time! Job creation beat economists' predictions. #BlameObama

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bikini itsy bitsy bikini graph job creation

It’s job creation time, which means it's time to bring back the Bikini Graph! As always, red columns point to monthly job totals under the Bush administration, while blue columns point to job totals under the Obama administration. This comes to us from the Maddow Blog, courtesy of the wonderful Steve Benen:

bikini graph Feb 2014 overall

bikini graph Feb 2014 private sectorSteve Benen:

Today’s announcement was a more pleasant reversal – job creation exceeded modest expectations.

The new report from Bureau of Labor Statistics shows the U.S. economy added 175,000 jobs in February, beating economists’ predictions. The unemployment rate inched higher to 6.7%, though as we’ve discussed many times, that’s not the metric to watch.

This time around, the unemployment rate ticked up because more people were out there looking for work, a healthy sign. Another nugget of good economic news: The public sector added an unusually high 13,000 jobs.

You may recall that the GOP have been doing all they can to eliminate public sector jobs (aka *gasp!* government jobs held by teachers, postal workers, firefighters, police officers, public transit workers, etc.). Why? Well, for one thing, a lot of those jobs are held by union members, and union members tend to vote for Democrats. For another thing, they want to minimize those jobs because, well... government. Duh.

But there's one thing they can't eliminate, no matter how hard they try: Facts.

[O]ver the last 12 months, the U.S. economy has added over 2.15 million jobs overall and 2.19 million in the private sector. What’s more, February was the 48th consecutive month in which we’ve seen private-sector job growth.

And we all know what that means, right?

blame Obama 2For more analysis by Benen, follow the link.

Our own David Garber's take on the jobs report can be found here.

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Bikini Graph time! 203,000 jobs added in Nov., unemployment falls to 7%, a 5-year low #BlameObama

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bikini itsy bitsy

It’s time to bring back the Bikini Graph! As always, red columns point to monthly job totals under the Bush administration, while blue columns point to job totals under the Obama administration. This comes to us from the Maddow Blog, courtesy of the wonderful Steve Benen:

bikini graph private sector Dec 2013 bikini graph Dec 2013 overall economy

The unemployment rate dropped from 7.3% to 7%. Oh my. Whatever will the GOP do now? I mean other than smear, attack, and lie relentlessly.

Benen:

[T]he totals from the Bureau of Labor Statistics were even better than expected.

According to the new BLS report, the U.S. economy added 203,000 jobs in November, ahead of economists’ predictions. In a pleasant change of pace, the public sector did not drag down the overall figures – the private sector added 196,000 jobs, while the public sector, which has hemorrhaged jobs in recent years, added 7,000. [...]

[S]o far in calendar year 2013, the economy has added 2.07 million jobs, which puts the U.S. on pace for the best year for job creation since before the 2008 crash. Indeed, this year is on track to the best for jobs since 2005, and the second best since 1999.

bamNow let's take a look at the Fox Biz news alert headline that was very visible in my very full inbox:

Consumer Sentiment Blows Past Estimates in December

What?!

Oh, do go on....

According to a gauge from Thomson Reuters and the University of Michigan, consumer sentiment rose to 82.5 in December from 75.1 in November, handily beating Wall Street’s estimate of a reading of 76. December’s reading was the highest since July.

Fox has always been notable for its accuracy in reporting, so who are we to challenge those numbers?

For more analysis by Benen, follow the link.

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Bikini Graph time! Job growth picks up steam, 204,000 jobs added! #BlameObama

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bikini itsy bitsyIt’s time to bring back the Bikini Graph! As always, red columns point to monthly job totals under the Bush administration, while blue columns point to job totals under the Obama administration. This comes to us from the Maddow Blog, courtesy of the wonderful Steve Benen:

bikini graph November 2013 overallbikini graph private sector November 2013

According to the new BLS report, the U.S. economy added 204,000 jobs in October, double economists’ expectations. The private sector added 212,000 jobs – the second best total of the year thus far.

The overall unemployment rate inched higher, from 7.2% to 7.3%, though as we’ve discussed many times, that’s not uncommon when job creation picks up.

Even better still are the revisions... a combined 60,000 additional jobs that had been previously unreported... [This year] the economy has added 1.86 million jobs, which puts the U.S. on pace for the best year for job creation since before the 2008 crash.

Can you imagine how much better this report would be had the GOP government shutdown not happened? And how much better off we'd all be? But in spite of all the Republican sabotage, the economy is plugging along and we had some unexpected job growth.

Boy howdy, will this ruffle a few GOP feathers! But oh wait, nobody's talking about good news. Everyone's too busy buzzing about the president's apology, the rocky Affordable Care Act roll out, and Chris Christie, Chris Christie, Chris Christie.

This is positive stuff, people. Smile.

For more analysis by Benen, follow the link.

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Guess who makes more income in states with lots of #union members?

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no sh-- Sherlock

From the Department of No Sh** Sherlock:

Think Progress: The middle class brings home a substantially larger share of aggregate earnings in states that have high rates of union membership than in those where fewer workers are organized, a Center for American Progress Action Fund (CAPAF) analysis of Census data shows. Amid very high and still increasing income inequality, union density appears to offer some buffer for middle-class Americans. [...]

...CAPAF’s David Madland and Keith Miller found that the states with the lowest rates of union membership return below-average shares of income to their middle-class residents. [...]

The rise of inequality over the past three decades tracks closely with the decline of union membership.

The income of the richest one percent has risen as middle class incomes drop.

As TP points out, and as we have in many posts, as unions get stronger, they increase their ability to stand up for workers. When that happens, not only does it improve work place conditions, but in the long run, income inequality is reduced.

And since the very rich make way more than the rest of us, leveling the playing field benefits the entire country, the health and welfare of more Americans, and the economy.

Not to mention, the decline of organized labor has helped worsen racial wage gap.

While you're at it, check out "What a difference a union can make!" and "Why unions matter, in a measly 1 minute 19 seconds."

chart graph why unions matter

unions gave us

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Decline of organized labor has helped worsen racial wage gap

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union pay difference food industry

unions right to work for less cartoon gop

Meredith Kleykamp and Jake Rosenfeld are professors of sociology at the University of Maryland and the University of Washington, respectively. Both are members of the Scholars Strategy Network, and both wrote an op-ed for the Los Angeles Times.

The topic: How the decline of labor unions has widened the racial wage gap and that "African Americans and other people of color have a lot at stake." They track the history of unions, their rise, their more recent sliding numbers, and the effect that has had on wages:

[O]ur research aimed to discover what wage trends among blacks and whites, men and women, would have looked like if union membership in the private sector of the U.S. economy had not declined so sharply. Here is what we learned:

• Had union membership rates for women remained at late-1970s levels, racial wage inequality among women in private sector jobs today would be reduced by as much as 30%.

• If rates of union membership among African American men working in the private sector were as high today as in the early 1970s, weekly wages would now be about $50 higher. For a full-time worker, that translates to an income increase of $2,600 a year. Regardless of race, all male workers have lost ground in the private sector as unions have declined.

They describe the modern labor movement as "remarkably inclusive" and one that has boosted African American and white workers and their families economically. The authors also conclude that the dwindling number of private sector unions has made the state of America's economic and social problems worse, including racial wage gaps.

Here are a few of the benefits that unions have provided:

labor unions brought us

See: "What a difference a union can make!" and "Why unions matter, in a measly 1 minute 19 seconds."

chart graph why unions matter

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Bikini Graph time! 169k new jobs, jobless rate dips to 7.3%, Obamacare not "significantly hindering job growth"

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bikini itsy bitsy

It’s time to bring back the Bikini Graph! As always, red columns point to monthly job totals under the Bush administration, while blue columns point to job totals under the Obama administration. This comes to us from the Maddow Blog, courtesy of the wonderful Steve Benen:

bikini graph September 2013 overall

bikin graph September 2013 private sector

The new report from the Bureau of Labor Statistics shows the U.S. economy added 169,000 jobs in August, which is roughly in line with expectations. After years of public-sector layoffs serving as a drag on the overall economy, we're starting to see a slight turnaround -- the private sector added 152,000 jobs last month, while the public sector added 17,000 jobs. That may seem like a fairly modest number, but it's the most in recent memory.

The overall unemployment rate dropped to 7.3%, which is the lowest it's been in nearly five years, but it's not evidence of good news -- it ticked down largely because of people leaving the workforce [...]

All told, so far in calendar year 2013, the economy has added 1.44 jobs overall, and 1.47 million in the private sector.

For more analysis by Benen, follow the link.

Earlier Paddy posted "Video- Fox's Stuart Varney Previews Jobs Report By Pushing Myth About Obamacare Causing Part-Time Employment." When in doubt, blame Obama, right Stewy?

He should have checked out this Los Angeles Times report. It's an assessment of the Affordable Care Act's effect on the economy from Mark Zandi, chief economist of Moody’s Analytics:

Zandi said the labor market was holding up well despite the drag from the automatic federal spending cuts and implementation of the healthcare reform law. Although there would be more hiring without those two factors, he said there's no indication they are significantly hindering job growth.

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