Archive for funeral

Webcams vs. TV news aka Real News vs. Speculative Blather

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

objectivity, webcams v news

There's a fascinating article about the recent crisis in Ferguson, Missouri in today's Los Angeles Times... in the Calendar section of all places. It compares and contrasts webcams points of view and TV news coverage of identical events. Per the author of the article, Robert Lloyd, "The news is by necessity, even by definition, exclusionary. But by triple-underlining the most notable or exciting aspects of a story — the "dramatic" elements..." it decides things for the viewer.

In other words, a stationary camera allows the onlooker to scrutinize details and activities beyond the flashy headlines.

TV news runs and reruns the most memorable or sensational clips ad nauseam, while webcams capture reality as it unfolds, impartially, albeit limited by its angle and vantage point. Details become focal points, if the audience is patient enough to notice them.

Sometimes the camera looked up the street and sometimes it looked down, but in either case it sat and looked. [...] Obviously, if you want to understand what's been happening in Ferguson, you need more than a Web stream. But it offers another way of looking at things and, in some ways, a more profound one.

The news is by necessity, even by definition, exclusionary. But by triple-underlining the most notable or exciting aspects of a story — the "dramatic" elements — the media also deform the reality they report upon...

Regular readers know that one of my pet peeves is media coverage, with all the endless speculation and misinformation out there, often just to boost ratings. And don't get me started on empty time-filling convos. Robert Lloyd pointed out a mutual gripe-- mind reading:

TV news cuts things up, cuts away and litters the screen with boxes and text and throws up a wall of speculating talking heads to clot the air with opinion, speculation and mind-reading.

Wolf Blitzer to Jake Tapper, on CNN, outside Brown's funeral: "I'm sure the Brown family is pleased that three officials from the White House have decided to attend this funeral today, right?"

Tapper: "I'm sure they are."

He went on to describe the contrast between Michael Brown's funeral service as depicted in select TV clips vs. observing the ceremony in real time from beginning to end, followed by a constant and objective video feed following mourners to the cemetery, including the surroundings. It can be more enlightening to watch the tedious but unblinking coverage by webcams than dramatic cable news sound bites that interpret developments for us.

As Lloyd put it, webcams continued to record what happened after the funeral: "Life went on." But we'll never see footage of that on TV.

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

A special tribute and reluctant good-bye to our Paddy

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

paddy laughing

UPDATE: Please remember Paddy by signing this guest book. The Political Carnival will not be adding any other posts today in honor of our dear sweet friend. We will resume regular posting tomorrow. Thank you.

------------------------------------------

I apologize ahead of time for rambling through this good-bye to the best partner and friend anyone could have. I can't seem to form thoughts lately.

Paddy's wonderful brother Chris put together a loving collage of Paddy's life (below), and what a life she had. He had it enlarged to 18 x 24 inches, laminated and mounted for her funeral service today.

I cropped out the photo above, because to me, that is the mischievous, full of life Paddy I remember and love. But each and every photo in the collage represents something special in her all too short time with us, particularly the ones of her with her sweet husband Jeff.

For those who have been kind enough to ask, yes, the pain is still all-consuming, the tears still well up all day long, and the shock is still excruciatingly fresh, showing no signs of abating; but with time, we will get through this heart-rending time and be left with the best of memories.

We are all so lucky to have known Paddy Kraska. She was a fierce, loyal, passionate, smart-as-hell, talented, sensitive, caring, hilarious, loving friend and warrior.

I miss her so much. So much.

Anyone who knew her-- whether on line or personally-- does.

It's just not the same without my Padlock, not even close.

Rest in peace, dear Paddy. Give Scooby a hug for me.

PaddyCollagePostACRA huge thank you to Lucian (@lwdgrfx) and David (@linzack) for being so strong and keeping things moving as I crumbled.

A special thank you to Anne Laurie at Balloon Juice and to the beyond generous ajijaakwe over at DKos for her post, her huge heart and her continued help with fundraising.

And to every one of you who donated your love and/or what you could to help Paddy's family with today's reception, my heartfelt gratitude.

Thank you for letting me lean on all of you.

Most of all, thank you Paddy Kraska, for letting me in and always being there.

All my love,

Laffy

**********************

For those who are only just finding out about Paddy's passing, here are links to previous posts:

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

Cartoons of the Day- GOP Gibberish

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

signing

Joe Heller

signing1

Jeff Darcy

Selfie

Rob Rogers

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

Video- President Barack Obama's moving tribute to Nelson Mandela in full

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

Who Put The Pearl In Pearl Harbor

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

USS Arizona

When I first visited Hawaii years ago, I had to go to Pearl Harbor. There was something special about coming from Massachusetts and just being on the island. But out of respect for my father, a veteran of both WWII and Korea, I was drawn to the military historical site. This was where the sneak attack launched the 'great war'. There was something special about the camaraderie and bonds that WWII forged. I can remember as a kid how my father got together every other week with his Army buddies. It was informal at best, but it was a must. Nothing but Christmas or Easter could change this friendly rendezvous. They talked about their escapades and their exploits. Never the death. Never the destruction. Never with regrets. They were proud veterans.

As I have become older and more understanding of strong bonds and friendships, I can fully appreciate a military service that was unknown to me until recently. It's a private interment service available to those who survived the sinking of the Arizona. Survivors of that attack went on, though many of their brothers in arms never basked again in the sun. But their absence was never a full void. They were remembered long after they were gone.

With a h/t to Andrew Meyers, I became aware of a rather under-the-radar memorial commemoration that takes place above and in the submerged carcass of the Arizona.  Here's a private look into a rarely spoken of privilege for those who survived the Pearl Harbor attack, but like all of us will, ultimately succumb to time. How considerate and thoughtful of the armed forces-- not generally known for it's sensitivity -- to provide a touching and fitting farewell to the more recently passed. Those who wish to be reunited with their buddies who didn't make it out.

I'm really proud of our military for their warm and generous option they've provided our brave heroes. Bravo.

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

Video- Margaret Thatcher funeral: St Paul's service in full

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

If you are so inclined, or just skip around.

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

What makes Hadiya Pendleton so important? This.

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

funeral Hadiya Pendleton

telegraphtv:

First lady Michelle Obama was among the mourners at the funeral of a 15-year-old girl who was shot to death eight days after performing with her high school band at President Barack Obama's inauguration.

As you know, a funeral was held for Hadiya Pendleton, a 15-year-old victim of gun violence who was killed for being in the wrong place at the wrong time. She was a high school honor student and a member of the majorette squad that performed at President Obama's inauguration. She was fatally shot about a mile from the president's home.

Police are still searching for the suspected gang member who gunned her down.

The L.A. Times published an article about Hadiya's funeral that brought me to tears, but it was something at the very end of the piece that caught my eye, something I hope a lot of people will now share widely:

[Damon] Stewart, Hadiya's godfather, talked about how the teen had become an important symbol for people. He said he had read a Facebook post that said, "I'm not going to buy into the hype. What makes this girl so much better than the others?"

He had an answer: "She is important because all those other people who died are important. She is important because all of the families who were silent, she speaks for them. She is a representative of the people across the nation who have lost their lives."

"I'm not going to buy into the hype." Hype? Really? The story of yet another child with a promising future and an infectious smile who had her life cut short by a murderer's bullet is "hype"?

What Hadiya's godfather said was spot on: She speaks for others who died the same way. She was, and still is, important. And that's no hype.

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare