Archive for France

The Book Booth: Small Business Saturday Edition

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Image via The Guardian

The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. @SeattleDan, along with his wife, @SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore here, as well as a brick and mortar storefront mini-store in Hoquiam, WA at 706 Simpson Ave (Route 101 South). Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

Today is Small Business Saturday and it is my fervent prayer that you all saved your pennies and did not shop any of the retailers open on Thanksgiving (and aid the corporate bastards) or get suckered into a Black Friday deal. Maybe next year when Black Friday comes we can all stand by the door and catch the gray men when they dive from the fourteenth floor.

One of the more interesting things that happened during the week was the discovery of a First Folio Shakespeare in a library in France. Only some 230 copies exist. When originally published in 1623, the cost was four pounds, which was a considerable amount of money then. I wonder if they'd sell it to me now for that much. I sort of doubt it.  Shakespeare

Another find during the week is the fabled "Joan Anderson" letter that a young Neal Cassady wrote to Jack Kerouac in the early fifties that ultimately changed Kerouac's prose style. NPR had the story here and is worth a listening. Kerouac

One of the perks of being a novelist (unless you're J.D.Salinger) is that sometimes you end up as a character in another writer's novel. Shakespeare, Dickens, Austen, Poe...and many others feature in this list of fifty novels with characters based on real authors from Flavorwire. Authors as Characters

Or you could end up, or have one of your characters, on a tee-shirt. Lucian passed along this selection of T's from Buzzfeed.
Literary T-Shirts

On the flip side from Buzzfeed, authors certainly hope that they're not put into these embarrassing situations at your local bookstore. Watch the signage folks!
Signage!

And speaking of fails, this is why local elections are important. You could have the Texas Board of Education making atrocious decisions on textbooks that affect the rest of the nation.
Texas Textbooks

It is coming on Winter and the days are growing shorter. And darker. Those afflicted with SAD probably should not take up the recommendations from Emily Temple at Flavorwire of the fifty gloomiest novels written.
Winter Literary Gloom

If civil war is more to your tastes, the Guardian had these suggestions, which is more international in scope. However, in my most humble opinion, there are much better books out there about the American Civil War than Gone with the Wind. Read Daniel Woodrell's A Woe to Live On, or Charles Frazier's Cold Mountain. Or The Red Badge of Courage.
Civil War Books

Sadly we note the passing of British mystery writer P.D. James at age 94. NPR has the story here.
P.D James has moved on.

Finally here is a sweet remembrance of the founder of the great New Directions publishing company James Laughlin by his friend Jonathan Galassi. It is not always the big publishing houses that bring out "litertature", but those small houses like ND or City Lights that make perusing a bookstore so delightful.
Smaller Publishers

We hope everyone had a most wonderful and splendid Thanksgiving. And please, if you are going to do some shopping today, please patronize your local small business. And by all means, let us know what books you're reading! We want to know.

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The Book Booth: The Nobel Prize Goes to Who? Edition

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The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. @SeattleDan, along with his wife, @SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore here, as well as a brick and mortar storefront mini-store in Hoquiam, WA at 706 Simpson Ave (Route 101 South). Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

Well the Nobel Committee has selected this year's winner and Haruni Murakami will have to wait for another year. The French writer Patrick Modiano took the honors, and as the WaPo points out, he is little known outside of France. And, I have to admit, I had not heard of him before the announcement was made. Patrick Modiano.

For the curious among you who'd like to know more about Modiano, Alexandra Schwartz at the New Yorker provides some context and assessment.  More on Modiano.

On the other hand, Jonathon Sturgeon at Flavorwire is completely baffled at this choice by the Swedish judges.
Even more on Modiano.

In other prize news, the venerable Kirkus Review, which has been around since 1933, will now be giving out awards for outstanding books and writers. The first ceremony will be held in Austin on October 23rd. NPR has the story.

In the film adaptation department, Shortlist magazine recently recommended nine films based on books that you may not be aware of. I was happy to see Ridley Scott's The Duelists, a negelcted film with a great performance by Harvey Keitel.  Films Based on Unknown Books.

I'm a fan of Paul Thomas Anderson's films, and I am also a fan of Thomas Pynchon's novels. It seems Anderson has directed Pynchon's novel Inherent Vice, due in theaters in December with a very interesting cast. This is the first work of Pynchon's that I know of to get a film treatment and I look forward to seeing it. Rope of Silicon reports on the critical reaction after a showing at the New York Film Festival.  Review of Inherent Vice

For fans of the TED talks, BookRiot has listed its literary favorites here. And it is always fun to see Billy Collins.
Literary TED Talks.

We know about book to film adaptation. How about book to song adaptation? If you've never heard Kate Bush's Wuthering Heights, go listen to it now! And what is Bobbie Gentry's Ode to Billie Joe but a Fauklner story set to music? The folks at Shortlist recently listed 25 songs that reference books.

Emily Temple at Flavorwire had a good article on the favorite books of fifty iconic celebrities.

Finally have you ever idly doodled or simply wanted to see if you still had some ink in your pen? Medieval copyists did, too. io9 has the story.  World's Oldest Book Doodles.

A good weekend for us all, and tell us what books you are currently devouring!

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France: Paris: A Walking Travel Tour

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From YouTube

Paris, being my favorite city, was deserving of a longer film. I hope that this longer, yet 'small scratch of the surface' film of this magnificent city shall convince you to visit for yourselves and experience all that Paris has to offer first hand. Bon Voyage!

I definitely recommend taking a tour with 'Sight Seekers Delight' in Paris. Their various walking tours show you the best of Paris. The URL for their website is on the YouTube site.

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France From Above HD - High Definition Views of the Chateaux de la Loire

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From YouTube

Get ready for some stunning flyover views along the Loire River in France. Some of the finest castles and palaces in the country. Unmissable European architectural masterpieces.

Be sure to subscribe to the World from Above' YT Channel here.

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