Archive for end of an era

VIDEO-- How to stop the Koch Bros, take power back from corporations: "Reinvent the way media looks and acts."

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koch bros murdoch buying newspapers

In November 2012, I wrote BIG problem: Former News Corp. exec expected to head Tribune Co., Rupert Murdoch eyes LA Times, Chicago Tribune.

Back in April, I wrote The Koch Bros., who plan to buy up 8 major newspapers, “see the conservative voice as not being well represented.” Um…:

Think Progress:

Right-wing funders and business industrialists David and Charles Koch may purchase the Tribune Company newspapers, which include the Chicago Tribune, Baltimore Sun, and the Los Angeles Times. The brothers are “interested in the clout they could gain through the Times’ editorial pages,” the Hollywood Reporter notes.

Under the circumstances, saying this is a serious concern is an understatement.

I'm an L.A. Times subscriber and if these corporate conservative monsters take over, it would be disastrous. I would immediately cancel my subscription and campaign for others to do the same.

Or I could introduce a lot of people to this. Via Free the Press, Buy the Tribune Company:

Corporate media is ruining the integrity of news. Winning the Tribune Company back might just start moving the tide in a different direction. Consider this an experiment that could have an enormous positive ripple effect for democracy.

Americans have said, time and time again, that they trust public and community media much more than corporate media. What if that extended not just to their radio or TV set but their local paper again?

Together we can make history. Really.

Can't contribute? That doesn't mean you can't help take back the media!

Spread the word, tell your social network on Facebook and Twitter. We're going to need as many people as possible to help out if we are going to meet our goal of raising $660 Million.

Also make sure to like The Other 98% on Facebook for even more opportunities to  bring down the corporatocracy.

Please watch the entire video and then link over, there is much more, including a bunch of cool graphics.

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Toilet Paper Will Be More Credible Than the Chicago Tribune Newspapers if Kochs Buy Them

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Via democurmudgeon.blogspot.com

Via democurmudgeon.blogspot.com

As I posted the other day, the Koch brothers are trying to take control of what we see, hear, and read in the Los Angeles Times and about seven other media outlets. They actually said that they want to “make sure our voice is being heard” and that “they see the conservative voice as not being well represented.” I wish I were kidding.

I've written about this a couple of times, and now my pal Mark Karlin has his own piece about it in Your Daily Dose of BuzzFlash at Truthout:

The creditors apparently want to sell the unprofitable newspapers but keep the lucrative television stations, radio stations, real estate and other profitable and potentially profitable divisions of the Tribune Company. [...]

Harold Meyerson writes in the Washington Post a virtual R.I.P. to the Los Angeles Times, in which he laments:

... Their purchase offer won’t be buttressed by a record of involvement in or commitment to journalism on their part. But it will come complete with a commitment to journalism as a branch of right-wing ideology….

The bankers’ men on the Tribune board likely view the sale of the papers as a financial transaction, pure and simple. But Times readers (and the Koch brothers themselves) would view a sale to the Kochs as a political transaction first and foremost, turning L.A.’s metropolitan daily into a right-wing mouthpiece whose commitment to empirical journalism would be unproven at best. A newspaper isn’t just a business; it’s also a civic trust. [...]

Indeed, the sale isn't final. In fact, negotiations are in the hush-hush/leak-leak stage. [...]

Furthermore, like the News World Media Development (a Unification Church affiliate) corporation-owned Washington Times and the Murdoch-owned New York Post, the Kochs can afford to run the papers at a loss in order to achieve their political goals through public influence. [...]

But there will be no question that with at least four major US papers potentially under the control of the Kochs, the national discourse will move even further to the right. And the Kochs can absorb the further financial losses incurred by increased cancelled subscriptions and the likely continued hemorrhaging of advertising dollars. Think of it as their "Americans for Prosperity" of the Fourth Estate. [...]

Just look what Americans for Prosperity and the recently shaken-up FreedomWorks accomplished: They put the House of Representatives under the control of a radical posse of Tea Party zealots in 2010, who block any legislation that can move the United States forward. Uh, that's about as big a return on investment as one can get – and the Kochs got it.

Please read the entire post here.

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Koch Bros., who plan to buy up 8 major newspapers, "see the conservative voice as not being well represented.” Um...

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nono

In November 2012, I wrote BIG problem: Former News Corp. exec expected to head Tribune Co., Rupert Murdoch eyes LA Times, Chicago Tribune.

I followed that up in March 2013 with If this report is true, I will cancel my subscription to the L.A. Times. That entry was in response to a report by Think Progress:

Right-wing funders and business industrialists David and Charles Koch may purchase the Tribune Company newspapers, which include the Chicago Tribune, Baltimore Sun, and the Los Angeles Times. The brothers are “interested in the clout they could gain through the Times’ editorial pages,” the Hollywood Reporter notes.

Under the circumstances, saying this is a serious concern is an understatement.

Here we are a month later and Think Progress has a follow-up that has my stomach in knots. They're reporting that Charles and David Koch are still trying to get their extremely wealthy, extremely right wing hands on up to eight (!) U.S. news outlets, per the New York Times, including including The Los Angeles Times, The Chicago Tribune, The Baltimore Sun, The Orlando Sentinel and The Hartford Courant.

See, they want to "make sure our voice is being heard." Note to Kochs: So do the rest of us.

They also have said that “they see the conservative voice as not being well represented.” We here at TPC beg to differ, or to put it another way:

bullshit alertThis proves that there is no such thing as a so-called "liberal media."

New York Times:

Politically, however, the papers could serve as a broader platform for the Kochs’ laissez-faire ideas. The Los Angeles Times is the fourth-largest paper in the country, and The Tribune is No. 9, and others are in several battleground states, including two of the largest newspapers in Florida, The Orlando Sentinel and The Sun Sentinel in Fort Lauderdale. A deal could include Hoy, the second-largest Spanish-language daily newspaper, which speaks to the pivotal Hispanic demographic.

As Think Progress notes, "The brothers also tried to influence the latest election by warning some 45,000 employees that there would be “consequences” if they didn’t vote for Republicans." Yes, that's exactly who should be running a big hunk of the media.

Freedom of the press is a right. Abusing it to spread their extremist propaganda would be reprehensible.

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If this report is true, I will cancel my subscription to the L.A. Times

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noooooooo

In November 2012, I wrote BIG problem: Former News Corp. exec expected to head Tribune Co., Rupert Murdoch eyes LA Times, Chicago Tribune.

Thankfully, that didn't happen, but something else did. Things just got worse.

Dear L.A. Times,

If you do what the report below says you may do, we will cancel our subscription, and we will suggest to everybody we know that they cancel theirs.

Sincerely,

Laffy

Via Think Progress:

Right-wing funders and business industrialists David and Charles Koch may purchase the Tribune Company newspapers, which include the Chicago Tribune, Baltimore Sun, and the Los Angeles Times. The brothers are “interested in the clout they could gain through the Times’ editorial pages,” the Hollywood Reporter notes.

Because, you know, the Koch brothers just don't have enough clout.

Via daromano

As I said back in November, feel free to contact the L.A. Times with a letter to the editor or their “convenient comment form.” For questions about journalistic standards, practices and accuracy, contact the Readers’ Representative Office by e-mail, phone (877) 554-4000 or fax (213) 237-3535.

help2

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BIG problem: Former News Corp. exec expected to head Tribune Co., Rupert Murdoch eyes LA Times, Chicago Tribune

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UPDATE:

And he actually tweeted this, too:

 

I'm heartsick. I am watching the painful demise of my home paper, the L.A. Times, the paper I've subscribed to for decades, the paper I insist on holding in my hands the old fashioned way as I read it daily, blurry-eyed, as I emerge from my early-morning comatose state, the paper I rely on to bring you stories that I can't find anywhere else, the paper from which I share excellent letters to the editor to post on this blog, the paper that, for the most part, provides thorough and fairly even-handed news coverage.

And now, as my stomach sinks to the floor, as my mouth goes dry and tears start forming in my still-blurry eyes, I'm reading in my morning L.A. Times that Peter Liguori, a former top executive at News Corp. is expected to be named chief executive of Tribune Co... and that Tribune's new owners could very well sell the Times and the Chicago Tribune.

And who wants to buy them? None other than the media's sleaziest right wing hackmeister, Rupert Murdoch. He's been dying to buy both papers for some time now. And despite occasionally reading about his greedy, nasty little desire, I never thought it would really happen.

As for Liguori, he's an adviser to the private equity firm Carlyle Group (remember them?) and held senior programming positions at News Corp.'s Fox Broadcasting, among other networks. Of course, News Corp. also has its conservative grip on the Wall Street Journal and the New York Post.

Welcome to my nightmare.

L.A. Times:

Liguori is in advanced conversations with incoming owners, according to people who requested anonymity. An official announcement is expected after Tribune emerges from bankruptcy and names a new board of directors, which could occur as early as next month. [...]

The FCC's staff issued the waivers of its so-called cross-ownership rules, which restrict newspapers from combining with television and radio stations in the same market.

The waivers cover Tribune newspaper and broadcasting units in Los Angeles, Chicago, New York, South Florida and Hartford, Conn. [...]

Tribune, which has been in bankruptcy for almost four years, owns the Los Angeles Times and KTLA-TV Channel 5 in Los Angeles, along with the Chicago Tribune, WGN radio and television stations and other newspapers and television stations throughout the country. The 23 TV stations are considered the most valuable part of the company.

Needless to say, should this go through, I will no longer be a subscriber.

Feel free to contact the L.A. Times with a letter to the editor or their "convenient comment form." For questions about journalistic standards, practices and accuracy, contact the Readers' Representative Office by e-mail, phone (877) 554-4000 or fax (213) 237-3535.

To make matters worse, here's what John Dean tweeted earlier:

Hope we're not on a dying planet called Twitter: http://daltoncaldwell.com/twitter-is-pivoting

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Photos of the Day- Shuttle Discovery Over Washington D.C.

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Very cool, and apparently everyone is out in D.C. gawking. Via Scott Foster (@ScottFoster) and Rich Prisinzano (@richpriz) on the Twitter machine.

For more, check out hashtag #spottheshuttle.

(Reuters) - The space shuttle Discovery took off on its final voyage on Tuesday, on a piggyback jet ride to the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum's Virginia annex.

The United States retired its space shuttles last year after finishing construction of the $100 billion International Space Station, a project of 15 countries, to begin work on a new generation of spaceships that can carry astronauts to destinations beyond the station's 240-mile-high (384-km-high) orbit.

Discovery, the fleet leader of NASA's three surviving shuttles, completed its last spaceflight in March 2011. It was promised to the Smithsonian Institution's National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C., the nation's official repository for space artifacts.

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GeoCities' time has expired, Yahoo closing the site today

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Truly the passing of an era. My first computer was very important to me, it took quite a while for me to save up and get over the nervousness to buy one. Second thing I did (after figuring out AOL was shite) was to set up a GeoCities page.

We always imagined how this might end: GeoCities would finally take down all of the animated "under construction" signs, and we'd hear one last Midi file to the tune of horns playing taps.

Instead, GeoCities will probably go down with a whimper today.

Time is up for Yahoo Inc.'s scheduled closing of perhaps the most significant virtual museum in recent history. Years ago a central meeting place for a massive chunk of American Web surfers, GeoCities will lock its doors and take millions of pages offline.

GeoCities allowed anyone to build a custom Web page for free and reserved a small amount of virtual storage to keep pictures and documents. It was perhaps the first mainstream example of an open, participatory and personal Internet.

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