Archive for electoral college

GOP strategist Mike Murphy: "Democrats begin each presidential election with a near lock on the Electoral College."

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it's a lock

Mike Murphy wrote this commentary in the Detroit Free Press:

The GOP's greatest challenge is the fact that Democrats begin each presidential election with a near lock on the Electoral College. Twenty-one states and the District of Columbia have given their electoral votes to the Democratic presidential nominee in at least five out of the last six elections. These states represent 257 electoral votes out of the 270 needed to win the presidency. Under current trends, the GOP nominee has to pull the equivalent of drawing an inside straight in poker to get to the White House. [...]

The GOP needs to reshuffle the deck and expand the presidential playing field. Success in Michigan could become its electoral ace in the hole.

Mike Murphy, a principal at the Revolution Agency, was the lead strategist to former Michigan Gov. John Engler and U.S. Sen. Spencer Abraham. Trent Wisecup is a Republican consultant who has worked for Abraham, Oakland County Executive Brooks Patterson and U.S. Rep. Joe Knollenberg.

I'm not sure how the Dems have a near lock on the Electoral College when Republicans are indeed "shuffling the deck" and "expanding the presidential playing field" by gerrymandering and disenfranchising voters as fast as they can. If some GOP states have their way, they will "apportion electoral votes by congressional district, a setup far more favorable to Republicans." In fact, it could change the outcome of future elections.

So as much as I want to believe that Dems have the advantage, I find it difficult to be that optimistic.

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"No one without a college education should be allowed to watch Fox News."

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Today's L.A. Times letter to the editor, because our voices matter:

Re “President, by popular vote,” Editorial, Nov. 12

The danger of your approach is that blue states are far more likely to adopt a fair electoral system than the red states. There is no way that the red bastions of the South and Midwest will relinquish their electoral majority to a popular vote.

Our great democratic experiment needs refinement. But a popular vote requirement is only one element. Voting periods need to be extended nationwide to two or three days at least; long voting lines should be eliminated; a national standard of qualification and identification for federal elections should be established; the primary season should be shortened to three months to increase voter interest; and the effects of big money on both parties should be eliminated.

Last but not least, no one without a college education should be allowed to watch Fox News.

Bill Robinson
San Clemente

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Letter: "I am a Republican. This year I voted Democrat. Why? It was their attitude."

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Today's L.A. Times letters to the editor, because our voices matter:

Re “Obama again: Swing states seal second term,” Nov. 7

I worked as a poll worker in Santa Fe Springs for 15 hours on election day.

I was elated to see the young and middle-aged men and women, senior citizens and the physically challenged with their wheelchairs, walkers and canes — all taking the time to come to the precinct and vote.

I translated in Spanish for about 30 people, some first-time voters. Some were immigrants who had recently become U.S. citizens. One woman from Ecuador had tears in her eyes and thanked me for assisting her in voting.

Near the end, an older gentleman arrived with two young men. He told me: “They have to stop playing their games or watching TV. They need to come to vote. They are the ones who will inherit this country.”

Juanita Meraz
Santa Fe Springs

***

I am a Republican and have been for the last 30 years. However, I am an American first. This year I voted Democrat. Why?

Because the Republicans became the “Republi-cants” and “the party of no.”

I expect the Republicans to work with the Democrats. Not doing so is anti-American, and I am an American first. So if they want to know why they lost — it was their attitude.

Elliott Brender
Villa Park

***

It was with a deep sense of shame that I watched fellow Americans have to wait two to three hours to cast their votes. I waited five minutes to vote. This is a problem easily fixed by adding polling stations.

Doubly shameful is the use of the electoral system — antiquated and unfair to voters of all parties, a system that makes the votes of those in “swing states” more valuable than the rest of the country.

I suspect that these issues will not be dealt with until the day before the next election.

Robert Shapiro
Long Beach

***

Though I'm not ready to accuse the mainstream media of contriving a too-close-to-call presidential contest in order to bolster audience attention, I will affirm that my faith in American democracy has been fortified by the reelection of President Obama.

After all, how could anyone who has been awake the last four years not be aware of our president's hard-earned accomplishments?

As the campaign slogan said: Osama bin Laden is dead; General Motors is alive. One doesn't have to be a fastidious fact-checker to acknowledge that truth.

Indeed, with 303 electoral votes compared with Mitt Romney's 206, this contest wasn't even a particularly close one. Thank goodness.

Now the president can get back to the business of governing our nation without the distraction of a seemingly endless, often inane campaign.

Ben Miles
Huntington Beach

***

Cheerleading for the failure of an American president and just saying no in Congress are not winning political strategies.

The silent majority spoke, and Republican/“tea party” extremism was rejected soundly. This is not a center-right country.

Alan Segal
San Diego

***

Some claim Romney lost because of the 47% remarks and Superstorm Sandy. During his concession speech, I could see the real reason he lost — there was no diversity among his supporters.

More than the dismal economic and social policies he wanted to implement, failing to recognize that the time of white control of government and politics is over alienated the new majority.

If the GOP continues to be led by the nose by the tea party, it will be as irrelevant nationally as it is in California. That's just fine with me.

Raul Valdez
Alhambra

***

If there were ever a case to be made for campaign finance reform, the amount of money spent on this election is it.

How many homeless shelters could have been provided? How many Head Start programs could have been funded? How many unsafe bridges could have been repaired or replaced? How many college scholarships could have been funded?

What a waste of money on all that campaign literature that went straight from my mail box directly into the recycle bin, unread.

The time for meaningful campaign finance reform is now. And it should come from a citizens committee because the politicians have no objectivity or interest in making meaningful changes.

Ed Hieshetter
San Diego

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Cartoons of the Day- Swing States

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Via.

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PhotOH! Obama v. Bush on jobs. Oh, and NINE electoral college predictions have Obama ahead!

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More here: “The unemployment rate went up slightly because of GOOD news… Job growth improved.”

Here's your Moment of Happy, via Taegan:

Ryan Teague Beckwith rounds up electoral maps from nine political prognosticators, all of which see President Obama winning re-election with anywhere from 281 to 332 electoral votes.

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3 Electoral College members (Paulites) may pass on GOP ticket

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You know I love my GOP infighting, and the Paulites make it so much more fun.

At least three Republican electors say they may not support their party's presidential ticket when the Electoral College meets in December to formally elect the new president, escalating tensions within the GOP and adding a fresh layer of intrigue to the final weeks of the White House race.

The electors - all are supporters of former GOP presidential candidate Ron Paul - told The Associated Press they are exploring options should Mitt Romney win their states. They expressed frustration at how Republican leaders have worked to suppress Paul's conservative movement and his legion of loyal supporters.

"They've never given Ron Paul a fair shot, and I'm disgusted with that. I'd like to show them how disgusted I am," said Melinda Wadsley, an Iowa mother of three who was selected a Republican elector earlier this year. She said she believes Paul is the better choice and noted that the Electoral College was founded with the idea that electors wouldn't just mimic the popular vote.

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