Archive for diversity

Young voters now much more solidly Democratic than prior generations

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

young voters Democrats

The more important question is, how do we get young voters to the polls to actually, you know, vote?

gallup young voters Democrats

Gallup:

Young adults -- those between the ages of 18 and 29 -- have typically aligned themselves with the Democratic Party, but they have become substantially more likely to do so since 2006. [...]

Recent decades have brought significant shifts in Americans' political allegiances, in the short term and the long term. While young adults have generally been more likely to align themselves with the Democratic Party than the Republican Party, they are now much more solidly Democratic than prior generations of young adults.

To a large extent, this reflects the increasing racial and ethnic diversity of the U.S. population, particularly among the youngest generations of Americans. And that growing diversity creates challenges for the Republican Party, given nonwhites' consistent and strong support for the Democratic Party.

Here's an idea, Republicans: If you want to attract the youth vote, try kicking bigots, racists, misogynists, birthers, and other loons out of your party. Then support immigration, public education, Obamacare, women's rights, voting rights, and civil rights. And instead of redistricting in order to win votes, earn them.

In other words, begin to open what's left of your minds and turn that fake outreach effort into reality.

What am I nuts? Look who I'm talking to here.

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

"Rare black Santa... our children can relate to." Oh, and Megyn Kelly "would not have been considered 'white.'"

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

Santa

black Santa

Melissa Harris-Perry wrote an astute, thought-provoking letter to Santa Claus in response to the ongoing mind-boggling controversy that is still all too prevalent in the year 2013:

Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Additionally, the Los Angeles Times devoted quite a bit of well-deserved print space to a heartwarming piece about a beloved Los Angeles mall Santa Claus, a 77-year-old man named Langston Patterson:

For nearly a decade, Patterson has been the main attraction at Baldwin Hills Crenshaw Plaza during Christmastime: a rare black Santa Claus in a sea of white ones.

The mall, located in the heart of black Los Angeles, is one of the few in the country with a black Santa Claus. Some say Patterson is the only black shopping-mall Santa Claus in the Los Angeles area.

As visitors approached him on a recent afternoon, it was hard to tell who was more excited: the youngsters or the adults. The parents are the most loyal. They return with grandchildren, passing on a family tradition with a deep personal meaning.

Better not tell Fox's Megyn Kelly; she might "jest" about it.

Speaking of the Megster, check out this Moment of Must Read from Juan Cole:

So while St. Nikolaos would probably be considered “white” in today’s America, he would not necessarily have been in the early twentieth century.

Likewise, a Jew from Nazareth would definitely not have been considered “white” by many Protestant Americans in the early twentieth century. There would have been social clubs he couldn’t have gotten into.

But here’s the kicker. Megyn Kelly has an Irish name, and if she is Irish-American, then she would not have been considered “white” by many Protestant northerners in the nineteenth century.

So let's get a few things straight:

Everyone is born covered with skin whose function it is to keep our blood, bones, and organs in place, and that skin has pigment, sometimes more, sometimes less. More pigment means more protection from the sun and inexplicably, more contempt and inequality. Less pigment means more vulnerability and requires a higher SPF, and inexplicably, less ridicule and torment and more privilege.

Religion is "belief in and worship of a superhuman controlling power, esp. a personal God or gods." Belief in a god or some other higher power is not innate, it is taught. We are raised a certain way, trained, and eventually accept or reject our religious/non-religious upbringing.

Prejudice, bigotry, racism, discrimination are also learned and cultivated; toddlers are not racists. Babies do not shun other babies based on their skin tone, nor are they repulsed by anyone's sexual orientation.

People are different. Their world views are different. Their colors, languages, appearances, physical, and psychological configurations are different. Their experiences are different.

We are a huge and diverse crowd that shares one planet, we always have been, we always will be.

Get over it, people. We are woefully-- painfully-- overdue to finally accept and embrace all of those myriad traits, characteristics, beliefs, non-beliefs, hues, heights, weights, and varieties of human beings that inhabit Earth. We live together in one enormous place, and not one of us is better than the other because of where we were born, who we love, what we do or don't believe in, or our genetic make-up. Not. One.

That discussions like these still consume so much media space, debate time, and human energy is bewildering. Then again, that Fox calls itself a news station and continues to draw viewers is equally bewildering.

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

Video- Supreme Court Sends Affirmative Action Back to Appellate Court

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

I thought this was a pretty good explanation of what happened. Looks like Thursday is the big day.

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

"Maybe the [GOP] elephant symbol needs to be replaced by... a middle-aged white evangelical male gun owner."

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

gop white guys

Today's L.A. Times letter to the editor, because our voices matter:

Re "Ugly numbers for the GOP," Column, March 4

It appears that Skelton's critique of the California Republican Party applies nationally. As California and the nation have become the most diverse they have ever been, the GOP has become less diverse. Maybe the elephant symbol needs to be replaced by the more appropriate one of a middle-aged white evangelical male gun owner.

The GOP strategy against President Obama has always been to portray him as the "other." How are we to believe this GOP is capable of embracing diversity?

Stan Seidel

Rancho Palos Verdes

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

Video- Soledad O’Brien To Former RNC Chair: Do Minorities Not Know You, Or Do They Just Not Like You?

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

Soledad rocks. Via.

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

Cartoon of the Day- Republican Outreach

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

Clay Bennett editorial cartoon

Via.

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

Valerie Jarrett: Obama Cabinet "far from finished - will have diversity including women, including people of color."

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

valerie jarrett leg obama cabinet

Premature judgification is rampant these days. Please note: If it persists for more than four hours, see your doctor. Or something. But enough about spoofs of epidemic GOP medical issues and, erm, shortcomings. We have gratuitous criticisms to address!

Or maybe they're not gratuitous, but can we at least give the president time to, you know, complete his Cabinet picks before we all jump on his choices?

(CNN) - "His Cabinet when he's finished - and he's far from finished - will have diversity including women, including people of color," Obama senior adviser Valerie Jarrett told CNN's chief national correspondent John King and chief political analyst Gloria Borger from the White House shortly before Obama took the Oath of Office.

See? Valerie Jarrett's leg isn't the only female representation that we should expect to almost, barely, kind of see in the coming months. We'll likely see all kinds of legs. Patience.

However, I do hope they'll be more prominent in the next group photo. Maybe both legs will even be visible next time. And if the photographer is feeling particularly generous, perhaps a glimpse of an arm would be in order.

Jarrett:

"One picture does not speak a thousand words."

"He believes he makes his best decisions when he is surrounded by people who have different perspectives and give him their best ideas," she said. "I spent a lot of time in the Oval Office and I'm in there with a great number of women who he listens to and whose council and advice he trusts greatly."

See?

So to all you critics out there, you don't have a leg to stand on. (Bygones.)

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare