Archive for did someone say drugs?

Speaking of Government Revenue Shortfalls, Tax Marijuana Instead of Prosecuting It

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Colorado Gov. John Hickenlooper (D) officially signed marijuana legalization into law.

And with that, Your Daily Dose of BuzzFlash at Truthout, via my pal Mark Karlin:

[T]he White House and Department of Justice are not only going to likely continue their wasteful prosecution against marijuana, despite laws passed on cities and states, it may very well expand the baffling war on weed [...]

Yes, it would be ludicrous to claim that tax revenues on marijuana would close the federal budget gap (cut military spending and raise taxes on those who need to pay their fair share for the benefits of democracy), but it could surely help contributing to alleviate it. [...]

Furthermore, making the marijuana industry a home grown product beyond Humboldt County, California, and other illicit hot spots would keep a lot of dollars that go to growers south of the border in the United States. [...]

And while other drugs, including cocaine and an increasing amount of meth are critical to the narco trafficking through Mexico, allowing marijuana use and cultivation in the US would reduce at least one of the drugs that the US is conducting a crusade against (via the corrupt forces of the Mexican government, military and police), a crusade that is killing tens of thousands of Mexicans in a failed show war. [...]

If you had two focus groups: one getting drunk on whiskey, and one getting high on marijuana, what would be the different end results?

Well, with the drunk group, you might end up with one or two of the participants getting into car accidents on the way home; if some of them didn't get into fights and arguments during the session; and if any one of them had a gun, all bets are off.

As for the group smoking marijuana, you might end up with one or two of them sitting with their legs crossed mesmerized by a kitten crossing a window sill; three of them listening to music on their I-Pods, with one of them singing along very loudly; and a couple making out.

So why is marijuana the banned control substance?

Please read the rest here.

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"A person can... purchase all manner of addictive drugs...Yes, I'm talking about Rite Aid and Walgreens."

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Today's L.A. Times letters to the editor, Part 2, because our voices matter:

Marijuana's place in L.A.

Re "Stuck with pot dispensaries," Editorial, Jan. 4

I live and work in downtown L.A. I was shocked and dismayed when two purveyors of dangerous and addictive drugs opened their doors mere steps from each other.

A person can walk into either of these establishments with nothing more than a doctor's recommendation and purchase all manner of addictive drugs. In addition they both sell tobacco, which has no known medical value, and one of them even sells alcohol, a gateway drug. Yes, I'm talking about Rite Aid and Walgreens.

What sort of message does this send to our children?

Jim Bean
Los Angeles

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CT GOP Sen. candidate Linda McMahon warned steroid doctor of investigation

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By GottaLaff

This won't exactly be a 2010 vote-getter:

In December 1989, as federal investigators were zeroing in on a Pennsylvania doctor who would soon be convicted of selling steroids to professional wrestlers, Linda McMahon sent a confidential memo to a fellow executive at Titan Sports, the family company that operated what was then known as the World Wrestling Federation.

The WWF, she wrote, should alert Dr. George T. Zahorian III that a criminal investigation could be heading his way, according to court documents reviewed by The Day.

"Although you and I discussed before about continuing to have Zahorian at our events as the doctor on call, I think that is now not a good idea," McMahon wrote in the memo. "Vince agreed, and would like for you to call Zahorian and to tell him not to come to any more of our events and to also clue him in on any action that the Justice Department is thinking of taking."

How above board and transparent of her. Who could ask for a better candidate than one who meddles in legal affairs that include steroidy drugs?

I'm sure she has a perfectly good explanation, though:

In an interview last week, McMahon said she could not explain the reason she directed Pat Patterson, a former wrestler, WWE executive and consultant, to alert Zahorian to the fact that he was under investigation.

See?

Connecticut can do better. Sneaky memos about secret drug dealings just won't cut it in a candidate. Then again, escapades like this are par for the GOP these days.

There is a whole lot more. Toddle on over and take a look-see.

H/t: TPM

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