Archive for details

VIDEO: What's the deal with Republicans and their refusal to provide details? Talkin' to you this time, Boehner.

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To go all Seinfeldian for a moment, what's the deal with Republicans and their refusal to provide details? Remember this collection of GOP evasion and secrecy?

Etc., etc., ad nauseam.

Republicans just can't seem to learn from their mistakes, because here we go again.  Then again, if Americans knew the details of their plans... fugetaboutit.

Today at a press conference, John Boehner said the following:

Boehner:

There has been no serious discussion of spending cuts so far. And unless there is, there is a real danger of going off the fiscal cliff. [...] So right now all eyes are on the White House…It’s time for the President, Congressional Democrats to tell the American people what spending cuts they’re willing to make.

Q:

So your 2011 position still stands, then? I mean, are you still offering, those talks from 2011, is that still the basis here?

Boehner:

Listen, I’m not going to get into the details, but it’s very clear what kind of spending cuts need to occur, but we have no idea what the White House is willing to do.

Pot. Kettle. Elusive.

Think Progress:

House Speaker John Boehner (R-OH) called on President Obama and Democrats to specify entitlement cuts that could balance their desires for tax increases in a hypothetical deal to avert the so-called “fiscal cliff,” even though only Republicans have demanded spending cuts to programs like Medicare and Social Security. Despite their support for putting entitlement programs on the chopping block, GOP lawmakers have refused to specify how, or by how much, they would cut the programs.

First, it's not a "fiscal cliff," more like a "fiscal bluff," and a crisis of their own making. Second, they're not entitlements, they're earned benefits.

And third, killing Medicare is not an option, voucherizing is not an option, avoiding direct questions is not an option, but this sure is: Liberals double down: No entitlement cuts.

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VIDEO- Mitt Romney: Middle income is $200,000 to $250,000 a year and less.

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Relevant segment at about 5:20.

Yes, you heard that correctly, on Planet Romney from Universe Out of Touch, middle income is defined as $200,000 to $250,000 a year and less.

He also said, "...In the speeches I give over the coming weeks I need to lay out some of the principles that were described in that [59 point – and more than 150 pages - economic plan].  And I will in more detail..."

What a novel idea. And when will he do that again?

Harvard professor Martin Feldstein says Romney’s math will work, but he would have to eliminate the home mortgage, charitable, state and local tax deductions for incomes greater than $100,000.

When I pressed Romney on that point, he conceded that he actually hadn’t read the Feldstein report that he and Paul Ryan cite on the campaign trail.

“I haven’t seen his precise study,” he said.

Thank you, ABC, for sharing this video.

Added: Oops, just saw that Paddy posted this video earlier.

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Republicans have given up trying to replace "Obamacare"... They got nothin'.

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by demachic

How many times have you heard the GOP scream their talking point "repeal and replace" President Obama's Affordable Care Act? It's become their mantra. Their candidate, Willard Romney, does that a lot. And now, even Republicans are admitting what a colossal waste of breath that is, because they know they have nothing to replace it with. As old time comedians would say, "They got nothin'."

Their 2009 alternative humiliated the party, because, for one, people don't take kindly to killing Medicare. Not only that but the Congressional Budget Office shot their proposal down because it would have left more than 50 million Americans without health insurance. It also made it more costly for the sick.

Good plan, guys.

Now it's election year 2012, and Willard and his GOP buddies are awfully vague about what they'd replace the ACA with, because, again, "they got nothin'."

And what little they do have admittedly wouldn't cover as many Americans as "Obamacare" does.

The L.A. Times has an entire article devoted to this:

Congressional Republicans, who once promised to "repeal and replace" President Obama's healthcare law, for now have all but given up pushing alternatives to the sweeping legislation the president signed in 2010. [...]

And as the House prepares to take its 33rd vote to repeal all or part of the Affordable Care Act, senior Republicans say they will not try to move a replacement plan until 2013 at the earliest. "There might be a chance for us to do this next year," House Rules Committee Chairman David Dreier (R-San Dimas) said Tuesday.

At the same time, GOP lawmakers are rejecting the notion that any replacement legislation should expand health coverage as much as the current law. [...]

But Republican leaders have not brought any of these proposals to a vote.

That has shielded the party's ideas from close scrutiny by independent analysts, a politically risky process that could highlight legislation's costs and its impact on consumers and others.

The GOP plan is this: We'll tell you later, but we won't divulge much because we know you won't like what little we have to say.

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Hispanic Republican Congressman slams Mitt Romney on immigration, wants "more details" and "compassion"

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Willard Romney says he will ignore journalists and will only communicate through far right wing websites. Willard Romney won't offer an alternative health care plan after promising to "repeal and replace" President Obama's Affordable Care Act. Willard Romney refuses to offer specifics about his approach to immigration.

Details, schmetails.

One Republican Congress member will have none of that. Via Buzzfeed:

A prominent Hispanic Republican and Miami power broker accused Mitt Romney of lacking leadership and compassion in his approach to immigration in an interview with BuzzFeed this week, and warned that elements of the Miami party machinery won't engage on election day without a more expansive Romney plan on immigration.

Rep. David Rivera... said he has yet to see a serious, satisfying proposal from Romney on the issue.

"I think Hispanic voters expect more details as to what that 'permanent solution' might be that he keeps talking about," Rivera said, referring to Romney's pledge to fix the immigration system while in office. [...]

[H]e added that as long as Romney's immigration position remains hazy, he would refuse to act as an official surrogate to Hispanic voters.

"I'm not willing to participate in any Hispanic outreach efforts without seeing more details on a permanent solution for these kids," he said.

David, David, David, come on now, you know better than that. One cannot realistically expect compassion from a robot.

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VIDEO- Axelrod: When You Go Into The Details, People Support The Healthcare Bill

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By GottaLaff

Earlier today, I made the following point:

When voters are polled about what is actually in the bill, they overwhelmingly approve. When they are polled after being bombarded by smears and lies, they raise their eyebrows a little.

They should be raising their eyebrows at the party who is misleading them, not the effort to improve their health and save their lives.

Now Crooks and Liars has a clip from David Axelrod that drives it home... to Jake Tapper, who can't seem to extricate himself from right wing talking points:

TAPPER: But according to polls, the American people do not agree with what you think--

AXELROD: The polls are split, Jake. I mean, one of the interesting things that has happened in the last four or five weeks is that if you look at -- if you average together the public polls, what you find is that the American people are split on the top line, do you support the plan? But again, when you go underneath, they support the elements of the plan. When you ask them, does the health care system need reform, three quarters of them say yes. When you ask them, do you want Congress to move forward and deal with this issue, three quarters of them say yes. So we're not going to walk away from this issue.

Ding! Right answer.

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