Archive for climate change

Groundwater Loss In US West Causing Earth's Crust To Lift

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Drought Sun

Image: The Huffington Post

The drought-stricken U.S. West is guzzling so much groundwater that the Earth’s crust is starting to “rise up like an uncoiled spring," California scientists said on Thursday. In some places, the Earth has lifted by more than half an inch. Using data points from hundreds of GPS stations, researchers found that nearly 62 trillion gallons of…

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To Serve and Protect... or Not

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Nicole Sandler

The "About LAPD" page at JoinLAPD.com tells us:

In 1955, a contest was announced in the Los Angeles Police Department's internal magazine, BEAT. The contest involved devising a motto for the Los Angeles Police Academy. The motto needed to be something that would succinctly express the ideals to which those who serve as Los Angeles Police Officers are dedicated. 

The winning entry, "to protect and to serve", was submitted by Officer Joseph S. Dorobek and served as the LAPD academy's motto until, by City Council action, it became the official motto of the entire Los Angeles Police Department in 1963. It continues to appear on the Department's patrol cars as a symbol of commitment to service. 

"To protect and to serve" has become one of the most recognizable phrases in law enforcement. Throughout its almost 50 years of use, it has come to embody the spirit, dedication, and professionalism of the Officers of the Los Angeles Police Department. 

Unfortunately for the people of Los Angeles in general, and Ezell Ford and his family in particular, they didn't live up to that motto Monday evening, when the 24-year old black man, described by his family as "mentally challenged" was shot dead by police.

The shooting occurred about 8:20 p.m. Monday after an officer conducted "an investigative stop" in the 200 block of West 65th Street, according to an LAPD news release. During the stop, a "struggle ensued" and the officer shot the person, whom police did not identify.

Family members identified the man as 24-year-old Ezell Ford, who they described as "mentally challenged." His mother, Tritobia Ford, told KTLA her son was complying with officers' orders, and that the shooting was unjustified.

Her son, she said, was lying on the ground Monday night when he was shot in the back. He later died at an area hospital.

"My heart is so heavy because my family is close," she said.

Now, some friends and family members are taking to Facebook organize a protest rally at 3 p.m. Sunday at LAPD's headquarters.

At the end of that LA Times article, one statistic stood out:

There have been at least 303 people killed in officer-involved shootings since 2007, according to The Times' Homicide Report database.

The eyes of the nation, and law enforcement decked out in para-military gear, have descended on Ferguson, MO, where unrest continues for a third day following the police-shooting death of 18-year old Michael Brown.

Aside from the horrific eyewitness accounts (which have reportedly not yet been heard by police!) the images of armored vehicles manned by machine gun-toting, camouflage and combat gear-wearing police officers soldiers are scaring citizens.

I shared a few passages on the show this morning from an article by Paul Szoldra in Business Insider titled, "This Is The Terrifying Result Of The Militarization Of Police," who likened the presence and artillery to his time in the Afghanistan war theater. 

While serving as a U.S. Marine on patrol in Afghanistan, we wore desert camouflage to blend in with our surroundings, carried rifles to shoot back when under enemy attack, and drove around in armored vehicles to ward off roadside bombs.

We looked intimidating, but all of our vehicles and equipment had a clear purpose for combat against enemy forces. So why is this same gear being used on our city streets?

On Saturday, a police officer in Ferguson, Missouri, shot and killed 18-year-old Michael Brown, an unarmed black man. In the days that have followed, the town with a population of about 21,000 has seen massive protests in response to the shooting, as some witnesses said Brown had his hands up when he was killed.

Putting aside what started the protests for a moment, it's worth discussing the police response to the outrage. In photos taken Monday, we are shown a heavily armed SWAT team.

They have short-barreled 5.56-mm rifles based on the military M4 carbine, with scopes that can accurately hit a target out to 500 meters. On their side they carry pistols. On their front, over their body armor, they carry at least four to six extra magazines, loaded with 30 rounds each.

The St. Louis County Police, of which the Ferguson Police Dept is part, uses that same "Serve and Protect" motto, as seen on one of their cars.

Serve and protect? These days it seems as if our police are doing neither. Something must change, and fast.

Susie Madrak of Crooks & Liars joined me on the show this morning, as she does every Wednesday. We spoke a bit about the tragic loss of Robin Williams and the shameful behavior of those who dare call him a coward or criticize his family for how they deal with their loss. We spoke about the sickening actions of those charged with serving and protecting their communities. And then, because we really, really needed it, we spoke about a wonderful story - that of a 13-year old leading her team into the Little League World Series. Yes, I said her team...

And finally, if you were driving on the Long Island Expressway this morning, chances are you had to be rescued from your submerged car!

More than two months worth of rain fell in two hours in New York's Long Island suburbs on Wednesday, causing flash flooding and swamping cars on major roads that were turned into rivers during the morning rush hour.

A total of 13.26 inches (33 cm) was measured at Long Island's MacArthur Airport in Islip, setting a preliminary statewide record for the most rainfall in one area in a 24-hour period, said Christopher Vaccaro, spokesman for the National Weather Service. The last such record of 11.6 inches (29 cm) was set in August 2011 in a Tannersville village during tropical storm Irene.

Parts of major commuter routes including the Long Island Expressway, the Seaford Oyster Bay Expressway, the Sunrise Highway and other roadways were closed due to flooding, police said. A train station parking lot was covered with at least two feet (61 cm) of water and multiple cars had been submerged up to their windows. Fire department boats were being deployed for rescue operations, according to National Weather Service reports.

I had already planned to talk with Desi Doyen of the Green News Report on the show this morning, only to be surprised - as was the NY/NJ area- by the massive downpour. We had already planned to talk about "Rapidly Warming Arctic Leading to Deadly Extreme Weather Events" before we knew we'd be having yet another one of those extreme weather events this morning!

And then there's that pesky, deadly methane we're starting to hear so much about. 

Lots of people ignored James Hanson's dire warning of what will happen if the oil from Canada's tar sands is exploited as "game over for climate". Perhaps his vernacular wasn't strong enough or clear enough.

So this time, Desi and I spoke about the words of caution from Dr. Jason Box, climatologist and professor of glaciology at the Geological Survey of Denmark and Greenland who has been studying the Arctic for decades. He tweeted his warning, strongly and succinctly:

If even a small fraction of Arctic sea floor carbon is released to the atmosphere, we're f'd.

— Jason Box (@climate_ice) July 29, 2014

Read more about what prompted that tweet and the science behind it here.  If the world hasn't imploded on us by then, I'll be back tomorrow... with Harry Shearer talking Nixon's the Oneand another "No More Bullshit Minute" with Stephen Goldstein too... Radio or Not!

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Over Half Of California Is In 'Exceptional Drought'

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Drought

Image: ourplanet.org.uk/

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Liz Cheney channels "Seinfeld"

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Dick Cheney, Liz Cheney Oh look, you're still here

"Seinfeld's" George Costanza was ahead of his time. His quote, "Everybody's doing something. We'll do nothing!" is resonating with-- wait for it-- Liz Cheney. Here's George the Prescient in his own very words:

Liz Cheney is no George Costanza. She is no visionary, and she certainly has no developed sense of humor reality, as her idiotic, shortsighted, terse little comment illustrates.

Via HuffPo's Amanda Terkel:

 

Liz Cheney did not hesitate when asked Monday what the Republican Party should do to address climate change.

"Nothing," she immediately replied.

And that concludes another in-depth interview with Dickette Cheney, a woman with the acumen of a gnat, the prophetic powers of GOP pollsters/Dick Morris, the logic of Sarah Palin, and the compassion of Daddy Dick.

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South Miami Mayor: "Rubio is an idiot."

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Marco Rubio

From the Things We Already Know Department: Marco Rubio is an "idiot." I know, I know, that's redundant, but there still may be someone out there reading this who isn't aware. In this particular instance, it's about climate change. Rubio the Genius-o doesn't believe that climate change is man-made-o:

"I do not believe that the laws that they propose we pass will do anything about it. Except it will destroy our economy."

His brilliance is blinding, isn't it? Kinda like the sun that's baking Mother Earth to death.

child squinting blinded by sun

He's clearly competing with former Alaskan Half-Gov Ignoramette McVacant for who can stick their head in the sand more deeply. It's a toss-up, but McVacant has a slight edge. But I digress. Back to Florida...

Here is a headline and sub-headline at The Guardian:

Miami, the great world city, is drowning while the powers that be look away

Low-lying south Florida, at the front line of climate change in the US, will be swallowed as sea levels rise. Astonishingly, the population is growing, house prices are rising and building goes on. The problem is the city is run by climate change deniers.

Via TPM:

Rubio is among those Florida politicians, including Gov. Rick Scott (R), who've refused to address the warnings of those experts.

"Rubio is an idiot," South Miami Mayor Philip Stoddard said, as quoted by The Guardian. "He says he is not a scientist so he doesn't have a view about climate change and sea-level rise and so won't do anything about it."

Stoddard noted that "the waters are rising." True.

And Marco Rubio is in way over his empty little head.

rubio etch a sketch

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Blood, Sweat and Tears

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BST

Blood, Sweat and Tears is the theme for today's show. Not the band, but the reality that those are the main components of life in the US of A in the 21st Century. Too much blood, too many dead or maimed soldiers and civilians thanks to our military incursions, misplaced ire and weapons of mass destruction. Our labor woes since the Bush depression, with a recovery made up of jobs at half the salaries we had before the meltdown, and the vilification of the labor movement that brought about workplace safety,  a 5-day/40-hour work week, vacation time, sick leave and other worker protections.

And tears. And more tears. And more to come, brought on by it all.

I don't see it getting any better, and don't see Hillary Clinton -or anyone at all from the other side - as the answer to our problems. But I do think we've shed way too much blood in unjust wars, have screwed over our working class and cried too many tears. It would be nice to see some positive change for a change, but I'm afraid we're a long way away from good times again.

Maybe if we could all just get along and live in peace.

On second thought, that'll never happen. Just look at their facial expressions when they sing the line, "we shall live in peace" during the most awkward singalong ever.

This morning, Susie Madrak of Crooks & Liars joined in to talk a bit about yesterday's primary elections in NY where it looks like Charlie Rangel will hold on to his House seat (47.4-43.6), and the runoff in Mississippi which saw Sen. Thad Cochran barely beating off the upstart teabagger Chris McDaniels 51-49.

We also talked about today's three Supreme Court decisions- one that unanimously found that law enforcement must obtain warrants before searching cell phones (opinion posted here), another ruling against Aereo, a new company that rebroadcast over-the-air TV signals online - or did until now (opinion posted here)! And a third (known as Fifth Third) having to do with pensions and funds that I don't understand at all, but the opinion is posted here.

We're still awaiting decisions on NLRB v. Noel Canning (recess appointments), McCullen v. Coakley (abortion clinic buffer zones),  Harris v. Quinn (public employee unions) and Hobby Lobby (contraception mandate), which will come down tomorrow morning at 10ET. If they don't announce all the decisions tomorrow, they'll come back to finish up on Monday June 30. Talk about suspense!

In the second hour of the show, I was thrilled to welcome investigative journalist and author Dahr Jamail back to the show. When I spoke with Dahr in the past, it was to discuss our wars in Middle East, as Dahr spent more than a year in Iraq as one of a very small group of independent, UNembedded journalists covering the war. I obviously wanted his take on the mess over there now.

Lately, he's been focusing his work on climate change or, as he calls it, anthropogenic climate disruption. Obviously, both issues are closely related. I urge you to read Dahr's work on both topics, either at his own site DahrJamail.net or over at Truthout.org.  We'll definitely talk again soon because our time together today went by way too quickly!

Tomorrow, well deal with whatever the Supreme Court throws at us at the start of the show, hear some fabulous female facts from Amy Simon and the No More Bullshit Minute with Stephen Goldstein too!

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Pity the Billionaire - or Not

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Listen to today's show:

Pity the Billionaire is the title of one of Thomas Frank's brilliant books, and one I immediately thought of when I read his current column, "Hillary Clinton forgets the '90s" Our latest gilded age and our latest phony populists" over at Salon.com.

In it, the man who originally asked What's the Matter with Kansas?  today reminds us that Hillary, with her latest references to our living in a new gilded age, was living in the White House with her then-president husband when Frank and his colleagues at The Baffler used the same phrase to describe that era.

In fact, as Frank recounts, there were a number of policies put in place by the Clinton administration that helped set us up for some of the big economic failures of the following decade, including

The point that really nailed the Gilded Age comparison, however, was the obvious return of monopoly in industry after industry. The concentration of media ownership, a development facilitated by Clinton’s 1996 telecom deregulation, was particularly scary: The Nation magazine ran a big chart showing who owned whom in the “National Entertainment State”; I myself called it the “Culture Trust.”

[Nicole's note: Thanks a fucking boatload for DESTROYING my industry Bill!]

The same kind of monopoly-building was happening in the ’90s in food processing and meat packing. It was happening in oil. It was happening among defense contractors, with the Clinton Administration’s active encouragement. And, as we all know, it was happening in the financial sector, a process that culminated in the much-celebrated repeal of the Glass-Steagall Act in 1999. Then there were Bill Clinton’s beloved free-trade deals; one effect of these, according to Barry Lynn of the New America Foundation, has been to expose our economy to monopolies based overseas, which have proceeded to gobble up sectors like the beer industry, 80 percent of which is controlled today by just two foreign companies.

Hmm.. Thomas Frank joined me on the show to talk about all of that and more this morning, and reminded me that next time, we need to begin our segment earlier because it always goes by way too quickly!

To begin the second hour of the show each day, we talk with someone from the Talk Radio News Service. Today it was former Congressman Bob Ney, who had some first-hand problems with Darrell Issa and had no problem sharing them with us when I asked about his embarrassing behavior at yesterday's hearing on the IRS non-scandal. We also briefly discussed the new report on climate change by a new organization, co chaired by Michael Bloomberg, Henry Paulson, and Tom Steyer - Risky Business. Check it out here, and stay tuned, as we'll unpack it on a future show soon.

As she does every Tuesday morning, The Political Carnival's GottaLaff  joined in for hour two.

We had fun - talking about John Oliver's calling the chair of the FCC a Dingo and getting called out on it, and naming a Faux Newsmodel today's "world's biggest asshole". We got serious - reading an email from a Vietnam War veteran who knows what our current wave of returning veterans are going through.  And we marveled at the amazing parents of one brave eight year old.

I don't think Laffy posted this story yet, so I will. The names have been changed to protect the privacy of the family.

A friend of ours shared a letter she got from another family, friends of theirs. We'll call them Lisa and Ted. Lisa and Ted have a son named Daniel. What follows is part of the letter they sent to friends and family, and I thank them for sharing their awesome parenting and research with us.

To those of you who have spent any time around us and know Daniel, I am sure it is obvious that he, like all kids, has his own set of unique and wonderful - as well as obnoxious – qualities.  Daniel is basically a typical 8 year old. He loves to read and draw. He enjoys climbing rocks, looking for bugs and worms, and making forts.  He is currently obsessed with ‘Wild Kratts’ and ‘creature powers’, and he loves swimming, playing in the ocean, camping and riding his bike. One of his favorite past times (much to our chagrin) is belting out songs at the top of his lungs (the current favorite is ‘Let It Go’ from Frozen). He can be loud and bossy at times but also super sweet and sometimes overly affectionate.   He is very intuitive and observant but he struggles at school with focusing and staying on task.

Daniel is also all about “typical” girl things:  Barbies, fairies, twirly dresses and all things related to fashion. He prefers to play with girls rather than boys, and identifies with everything feminine.  He can create very artistic outfits, complete with high heels, out of a few scarves and safety pins. He is fond of modeling and performing for whoever will watch.  He prefers to wear a nightgown to bed, and chooses girls skirts, leggings and dresses out to play and to school.

Since Daniel has shown all of these behaviors consistently since he was two, Ted and I have done our best to support him as he is; to talk to him about his feelings, make sure he is comfortable in his own skin, and to educate ourselves.  We have done a lot of research and participate in a local support group, as well as a national organization that links families like ours together.

Right now Daniel is figuring out what feels right – she has expressed a desire for us, her teacher and kids at school to use feminine pronouns and the name, Sophie.   Daniel feels and acts like a girl. People who don’t know us always assume he is a girl. He loves when people mistake him for a girl and it happens all the time now. In fact, at his request, we are transitioning ‘him’ to ‘her’ in all her upcoming summer camps. We have talked with the principal at her school and, though all legal documents still will read ‘Daniel’, she will be entering 3rd grade next year as a girl named Sophie, with everything that entails, including use of the girls’ restroom. We do not know how Daniel will identify himself in 2, 5 or 10 years. All we know is who she feels herself to be today – Sophie.

There is a lot of information about our situation and a LOT of kids, boys and girls, like Sophie who have traits of the opposite genders.  The “scientific” terms for how Sophie acts are gender variant, gender fluid, or gender non-conforming and possibly transgender. We know from our outreach that many kids like Sophie have considerably more stress about the dichotomy between their anatomy and their internal gender.  And there are many kids, unlike Sophie, who are gender different but only slightly so (i.e. feel no need to dress or wear hair as the opposite gender).  We feel very fortunate that, at least right now, she seems a happy and well-adjusted child without a lot of angst or worries, who gets to express herself in play and life  just as it feels right to her (like all of us gender-typical people do all the time!).   She wears what she wants to school, play, or family events and we honor her request to be called Sophie.  We expect that things may change as she ages but our hope is that she will never have to hide who she is in order to be safe and feel loved.

Here are some of the facts:

  • Research indicates that gender identity and behavior is hard wired in the brain before or soon after birth and that biologic factors (hormone levels etc.) cement gender identity during the first 6-12 months of life.  Sophie’s attraction to girl things, her need to dress like a girl in order to express how she feels inside and to play with girl things -  are as normal to her and as much a part of her inner being as being left-handed or having perfect pitch is to some people.  All of Sophie’s behaviors –boyish ones and girlish ones, come from within.  They are not choices she is making.  They are part of her just like her brownie blue eyes and her sensitive soul.
  •  This is not something that as parents, we can “fix”.  Some might argue that we “encourage” it, so it continues.  Some might say that if we didn’t “indulge” her desires then she would forget about them (out of sight out of mind).  They would be totally wrong.  Sophie chooses to wear a dress/skirt or sparkly tight leggings when, inside she feels like she wants to be herself. She doesn’t wear a dress to get attention – she does it because she wants to express herself and that is what feels right to her.  When we have a dress up affair, her immediate desire is for a dressy outfit and high heels because that’s what dressy means to her.  If this is not intuitive to you – those of you that have boys, are married to boys or are typical boys – ask yourself if that boy would ever put on a dress or heels just to be silly or get attention?  I assume the answer is no.  Sophie does sometimes seek attention when she is in an outfit she thinks is especially pretty - but it is because she wants to show off her true self, not because she can’t get attention other ways.
  •  This is not something Sophie is going to grow out of.  None of us know what kind of adult she will be, but this is not a “phase”.  She may become more “boyish” or more “girlish” or go back and forth between the two her whole life.  And even though she is only 8 it already creates some stress for her.  She is well aware that other boys don’t play like she does – for the most part, so far, she doesn’t care what anyone thinks, she just revels in the joy she feels when she can express the girl part of herself.
  •  No matter how open-minded a person you think you are or how much you love someone – seeing a boy act and dress like a girl is awkward at best and basically a hard thing to accept easily, at first.  I can tell you though, that awkwardness disappears with time – she is just Sophie, regardless of what she is wearing.  We are all so “norm” socialized that it makes even the best of us feel “funny” to see her in a dress.   [BTW- there are plenty of girls who are gender fluid also, and experience discrimination, bullying etc. – however, at this young age our society and socialization make those girls who act and dress like boys blend in better. They are way easier to accept than boys who act like girls.]
  •  Eight year old children are not sexual beings.  Plain and simple.  So this issue for us – from now to puberty at least – is not about what Sophie’s life will be like as an adult, but just about what it is like to be different.  Somehow people just can’t help themselves from thinking gender identity equates with sexual orientation.  From what limited research there is out there, we know that a small percentage of these kids are truly transgender and will go on to physically change genders as teens or adults.  A percentage (higher than in a control group) will be gay and some will be heterosexual.  The point we are making is that whom-so-ever Sophie becomes in 10 years, gender-wise or sexual preference-wise, is absolutely NOT the issue.  The issue is that she needs support and encouragement to love herself as she is now.

We are providing this letter because, if it were you having issues in your family that were as important as this, we would want to understand what those issues were and be able to be informed and supportive.  Along those lines, there is a lot more information out there about gender variance than we have summarized here. If you are interested we are happy to share.  Below there are a couple articles that you might find of interest and we can share other resources if you want as well.

We know for a fact that if we had said nothing at all, you would accept and love Sophie just as she is.  Now that we have said something, we also know that you will support our decisions to let her express herself freely and decide for herself what to wear and how to present herself:  that you will love, play, discipline and enjoy her in every way possible and encourage her to be the happiest and best person she is capable of being.  She should not get any extra slack for being different – she needs to learn from each of you how to behave like a good person and that is what we hope you will teach her.

These are the things we try to do to support Sophie and to help her build a strong character and sense of self:  We hope you, our family and friends, will help us in doing everything possible to see that she aspires to great things.  For now, we just want our home and our friends’ and families’ homes to be her “safe” places where she can be herself, whoever that is at that moment.

  • Love her for who she is.
  • Validate her – whenever it comes up or there is conversation, let her know that you know it to be true that there is more than one way to be a boy or a girl, that you imagine it is hard that some kids don’t get how you feel, etc.
  • Encourage her individuality (you look beautiful in that dress!) and avoid stereotypical comments (boys don’t skip!)
  • Acknowledge and celebrate difference – she is different and knows it and there is nothing to be ashamed of – when she wants to talk about it, talk about it; give examples of how you are different or how being different can be great!
  • Try and deal with your own demons – recognize your own internal issues about gender and how they play in to your feelings about Sophie.
  • Be Sophie’s advocate – if you are with her in a situation where something is awkward – someone is teasing or judgmental – speak up for her, and help her speak up for herself.
  • No victim blaming  –– Sophie is not responsible for other people’s intolerance – neither she nor we, her family/friends, have to ‘accept’ that people are going to be judgmental nor does she/we have to constantly be hiding who she is in order to fit in - when people tease or bully or are unaccepting, they are at fault.
  • Think about tolerance in other things that you do – making the world OK for Sophie means we all have to work on squashing eons of ingrained stereotypes; think of ways to line up or sort people other than “boys in one line, girls in another”, advocate for others who are different and struggling, examine the world around you and step up/speak out when someone is treated unfairly or unjustly because they are not like you and don’t blend in.

In spite of this horribly lengthy missive, in the grand scheme of things, Sophie’s gender variance is just an attribute of her for us to celebrate and learn from.  We are so lucky to have a happy healthy kid. Relative to the horrific things that other people have to endure with their kids all over the world, this is nothing.

And lastly, being our family and friends, we have no doubt that everyone will have an opinion to share – we hope so!  We encourage you to ask us anything you want and to offer whatever suggestions you have.  This parenting thing is a conundrum at best and we can use a lot of help!  The one thing that we ask is that you all respect our decision to support Sophie unequivocally. If you have an issue with that decision or you don’t agree with it, you take that up with us – not her.  For right now, she is growing her hair, wearing girl clothes and being addressed as Sophie (which she loves).  So as long as she is behaving as any nice child should, we don’t expect her to take grief in any form, from anyone in our inner circle.

Pretty amazing parenting! I only hope that I'd have been as open minded and wonderful if ever faced with a similar situation. All we parents have our own hurdles to conquer, but "Lisa and Ted" have earned my greatest respect.

I'll be back tomorrow with another show, with Crooks & Liars' Susie Madrak, and Truthout's Dahr Jamail.

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