Archive for campaign fundraising

Elizabeth Warren's "growing clout could shift the caucus to the left"

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clout elizabeth warren

The Hill has a post about Senator Elizabeth Warren's "growing clout" that should make many a Progressive smile and nod. It may even send a thrill up some Democratic legs. Clout coming from the left can do that.

Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.) has emerged as one of the top fundraisers for Senate Democratic candidates in the midterm election campaign, filling a void left by the absence of Hillary Clinton.

Warren, who was elected to her first term in 2012, has already raised more than $2.3 million for Senate Democratic candidates this election cycle, according to her staff. She has also transferred $100,000 from her campaign account to the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (DSCC).

She’s the biggest draw so far,” said a Senate Democratic campaign aide, referring to Warren’s knack for getting donors to open up their checkbooks.

Lets hope a few of the donors she appeals to have checkbooks the size of the Koch brothers'.

The article goes on about how, when it comes to fundraising, Hillary Clinton is "staying on the sidelines" these days, but Senator Clout is stepping up in a big way, which only "accentuates her influence." This is great news, because Dems badly need to keep the majority in the Senate, and that is exactly what Senator Warren aims to do.

Pretty impressive for a freshman, says The Hill. Even more impressive is her appeal to women voters, who overwhelmingly vote for Democrats.

But this was my favorite sentence in the entire piece:

Democratic strategists and political experts say Warren’s growing clout could shift the caucus to the left, especially on economic and financial regulatory issues.

We need 100 more Elizabeth Warrens.

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House Dems show better first-quarter fundraising than at-risk Republicans

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moneyhands

 

Gosh. I'm sooo sorry to hear of their difficulties.

House Democrats are winning the early round of the 2013 fundraising battle over a number of at-risk Republicans.

Several House Republicans facing potentially tough reelection campaigns reported lackluster results in first-quarter filings with the Federal Election Commission, which were due Monday.

Those stragglers could prove a headache for the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) as it fights to prevent Democrats from picking up seats — or winning back the House — in the 2014 midterms.

“This should be a wake-up call to Republican members,” one GOP strategist told The Hill.

“They need to step it up if they want to keep the majority and keep [Rep.] Nancy Pelosi [D-Calif.] out of the Speaker’s chair.”


 

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Supreme Court will hear appeal of campaign donation limits

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Time to start praying or whatever your wont is.

Three years after the landmark Citizens United decision that dramatically changed campaign finance laws, the Supreme Court announced Tuesday it will take up another campaign finance case challenging how much donors can give to campaigns and committees.

The court will hear McCutcheon v. Federal Election Commission, which deals with the constitutionality of aggregate contribution limits, in October. Shaun McCutcheon, an Alabama resident, contributed a total of $33,088 to 16 different candidates during the 2012 election cycle and thousands more to party committees. He wanted his total contributions for the cycle to total $75,000 to party committees and $54,400 to candidates but was barred from giving at that level by federal aggregate limits.

The Republican National Committee and McCutcheon challenged the FEC’s contribution limits under the First Amendment, saying the $46,200 aggregate limit for candidates and $70,800 limit for committees was “unsupported by any cognizable government interest … at any level of review.”

The U.S. Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia upheld the limits.

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"Think of what we could do with $2 billion" that was raised in this election

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Today's L.A. Times letter to the editor, because our voices matter:

Re "Bursts of fundraising power the stretch run," Oct. 26

It's likely that President Obama and Mitt Romney will each have raised more than $1 billion by the time the campaign is finished. I think this is obscene and a great waste of money. Think what we could do with $2 billion: Retire the debt of bankrupt cities and states, help schools, add more public transit, repair streets and do so many things that would help the infrastructure and the people of our country.

Our priorities are truly misplaced.

Clara Browda

Los Angeles

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Obama, Democrats raise $181M combined in September

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Hmm, makes you wonder why the Wingers think Mittens is doing so well with his sudden "surge" in fundraising.

WASHINGTON -- President Barack Obama's campaign and Democrats have raised $181 million combined in September, pulling in the most money in one month during his re-election bid.

Obama's fundraising haul topped the more than $114 million raised by his campaign and Democrats during the month of August. Republican presidential nominee Mitt Romney's campaign and Republicans have not yet reported September fundraising totals.

Obama says in a message on Twitter, the online social network, that more than 1.8 million people donated in September, including more than a half-million who had not donated before in 2008 or 2012.

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