Archive for BP – Page 2

BP still hasn't paid billions of dollars in fines, other payments to Gulf Coast, environmental groups

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suck it bp

If you have an ounce of logic in you, then you know that the longer we wait to repair what BP destroyed, the more difficult it will be to fix their mess. BP accepted criminal liability in the 2010 gulf oil disaster and was supposed to pay a $4-billion fine.

And tests confirmed, and Hurricane Isaac exposed, that globs of oil found on Louisiana beaches after Hurricane Isaac came from the 2010 BP spill. The area is still suffering the consequences of BP's negligence and they should be falling all over themselves to rectify that.

BP has pleaded guilty to manslaughter and environmental crimes, because:

BP we care

USA Today:

Saturday marks the third anniversary of the spill in 2010, but only a small fraction of the billions in fines and other money owed by BP has trickled in for use on restoration projects, environmental groups say.

Local, state and environmental groups are banking on money from several sources

However, BP is proud to use their money to pay people to go on the Tee Vee Machine and say reassuring things like this:

bp adbp ad smaller

And they lavish us with ads like this repeatedly force ads like this down our throats:

Here's what's really going on:

Gulf Coast groups say the region is still struggling.

Environmental groups say an unusually high number of sick dolphins are washing up on shore. They're also finding tar balls on beaches, particularly after big storms.

USA Today has all the gory details.

If you really want to get your blood boiling, read this via the Government Accountability Project:

On April 19, 2013, GAP released Deadly Dispersants in the Gulf: Are Public Health and Environmental Tragedies the New Norm for Oil Spill Cleanups? The report details the devastating long-term effects on human health and the Gulf of Mexico ecosystem stemming from BP and the federal government's widespread use of the dispersant Corexit, in response to the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill. [...]

Conclusions from the report strongly suggest that the dispersant Corexit was widely applied in the aftermath of the Deepwater Horizon explosion because it caused the false impression that the oil disappeared. In reality, the oil/Corexit mixture became less visible, yet much more toxic than the oil alone. Nonetheless, indications are that both BP and the government were pleased with what Corexit accomplished. The report is available here: Part One, Part Two, Part Three

"We will clean this up. We will make this right."

We won't hold our breath.

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BREAKING: BP accepts criminal liability in gulf oil spill, will pay $4-billion fine

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UPDATE:

Via an L.A. Times email alert, this isn't enough to compensate for the loss of human life, sea life, and environmental damage:

Energy giant BP has accepted criminal liability and will pay at least $4 billion in connection with the 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico, one of the nation's worst environmental disasters.

In an announcement today from its London headquarters, BP confirmed an agreement with the U.S. Justice Department to resolve all federal criminal charges and all claims by the Securities and Exchange Commission against the company stemming from the events that began with the April 2010 explosion of the Deepwater Horizon oil rig.

As part of the agreement, BP said it has agreed to plead guilty to 11 felony counts of misconduct or neglect in connection with the 11 deaths caused by the rig's explosion. It also agreed to plead guilty to other charges, including one felony count of obstruction of Congress. The agreement is subject to U.S. federal court approval.

For the latest information go to www.latimes.com.

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Tests confirm, and Hurricane Isaac exposes, Louisiana oil came from BP spill

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BP has gone out of their way to let us know how much they care. Why, when you think about it, they cared so much that they were reckless as hell, killed eleven people, destroyed wildlife, poisoned and/or killed our oceans, and put countless lives in danger.

Hurricane Isaac managed to redistribute some of BP's care in the form of tar balls, a fact that can no longer be disputed:

NEW ORLEANS (AP) -- Laboratory tests show that globs of oil found on two Louisiana beaches after Hurricane Isaac came from the 2010 BP spill.

Tests run by Louisiana State University for state wildlife officials confirmed that oil found on Elmer's Island and Grand Isle matched the biological fingerprint of the hundreds of millions of gallons of oil that spewed from BP's Macondo well.

On Wednesday, BP PLC said oil from its spill had been exposed by Isaac's waves and that the company would work to clean it up.

But Louisiana isn't the only place that oil has been discovered:

About 100 pounds of tar balls collected on the Alabama coast after Isaac are being tested at Auburn University, which has a contract with local government to assess the material. 

Researcher Joel Hayworth is calling this "the new normal for the Gulf Coast." Way to go, BP!

BP has been running TV ads touting Gulf Coast tourism and urging people to "come on down."

Oh, and there's this: How Bain Capital helped BP blow up the Deepwater Horizon

All our BP posts are here.

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How Bain Capital helped BP blow up the Deepwater Horizon

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Today's Quickie comes from Greg Palast, a wonderful investigative reporter:

A Book Review by Greg Palast, for FireDogLake.com
on Poisoned Legacy: the Human Cost of BP's Rise to Power (St. Martin's Press) by Mike Magner.

Here's my bead on Magner's book....

I almost fell off the barstool when I read that it was Bain Capital (Mitt Romney, former CEO), that told oil giant BP it was a good idea to cut costs. The cuts would lead to death, mayhem and the destruction of the Gulf Coast (not to mention BP’s poisoning of Alaska, Africa, Central Asia and Colombia).

Please read more here.

All our BP posts are here (scroll).

That was today's Quickie. Was it good for you?

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Spill, baby, spill: Enbridge, the company with a "pattern of failure," avoids federal oversight of oil pipeline plans

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Visit NBCNews.com for breaking news, world news, and news about the economy

Remember the 2010 Kalamazoo oil disaster? If not, the above video will help. So will this via WaPo:

The National Transportation Safety Board blamed multiple corrosion cracks and “pervasive organizational failures” at the Calgary-based Enbridge pipeline company for a more-than-20,000-barrel oil spill two years ago near Michigan’s Kalamazoo River. [...]

The NTSB also blamed “weak federal regulations” by the Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration for the accident, which spilled at least 843,444 gallons of oil into a tributary of the Kalamazoo in Marshall, Mich. The oil spread into a 40-mile stretch of the Kalamazoo and a nearby wetlands area.

Then Enbridge gave us their next little environmentally disastrous gift. Via The L.A. Times:

Enbridge, a beleaguered Canadian oil pipeline company, has spilled more than 50,000 gallons of light crude oil in rural Wisconsin —  shortly after the company said it had implemented safety reforms after a massive 2010 spill in Michigan. [...]

Enbridge is fast becoming to the Midwest what BP was to the Gulf of Mexico, posing troubling risks to the environment,” [U.S. Rep. Ed Markey (D-Mass.)] said in a statement. [...]

According to Enbridge company data collected by the Polaris Institute, a Canadian think tank, Enbridge pipelines have spilled 804 times since 1999 and leaked 6.8 million gallons of oil. In response to a U.S. National Transportation Safety Board investigation blasting the company for its actions during the Michigan spill, the company said it had made “numerous enhancements” to safety procedures. [...]

National Response Center data shows that the new Enbridge spill in Wisconsin is the company’s worst in that state.

That's some safety record, huh?

Yesterday, this was posted by the Canadian Press: National Energy Board wants Enbridge’s internal report on Michigan spill. They want "documentation of improvements" by Enbridge along with "a copy of Enbridge’s internal investigation into the pipeline rupture and documentation of the corrective actions it has taken."

Good luck with that.

And that brings us to today's article from the L.A. Times that informs us of how Enbridge has managed to avoid scrutiny and continue to spill, baby, spill. You see, they already have their permits from awhile ago, and they can proceed because all that dirty work will take place in the U.S. of A:

ANN ARBOR, Mich. — A major rival to the controversial Keystone XL oil pipeline project is vastly boosting its U.S. pipeline system, but it's avoiding the same scrutiny that federal regulators, environmentalists and landowners are giving Keystone owner TransCanada Corp. [...]

The task of determining the safety or wisdom of Enbridge pipeline routes falls on a patchwork of local, county and state jurisdictions through the Midwest and East, most of which lack intensive pipeline expertise. [...] The responsibility for determining what can and can't be done now falls on often highly constrained or inexperienced local authorities.

Yes, the same company that U.S. pipeline regulators have "long-standing concerns" about the "pattern of failures" has avoided federal oversight and is permitted to continue their "pattern of failures." Inspires confidence, doesn't it?

The company said its plans to boost the Michigan line's capacity — the same line that spilled into the Kalamazoo River — from the current 240,000 barrels a day to 500,000 barrels a day doesn't require a new presidential permit even though the line sends oil into Ontario. [...]

Nearly all of Enbridge's projects would thread through rivers, creeks, fields and wildlife habitats, and Enbridge needs to negotiate with landowners even though the new pipelines and expansion projects would stick closely to existing pipeline pathways.

Regulations, schmegulations, right GOP?

More here.

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Wisconsin oil disaster is Canadian firm's worst since their last worst oil disaster

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As I have with torture, fracking, and voter suppression, I've concentrated a lot on posts about oil disasters, notably the BP cataclysm. These issues are mind-bogglingly huge, affect us as a country  deeply, and are maddeningly frustrating to many of us because they never seem to be resolved properly.

In the same general category as the BP mess are the impending Keystone XL "Tar Sands" Pipeline mess and the current Michigan oil catastrophe. The broken pipeline in Michigan gushed more than 800,000 gallons of heavy crude and was one of the largest and most expensive inland oil spills in U.S. history. CBS:

Officials said 35 miles of waterways and wetlands were fouled and about 320 people reported symptoms from crude oil exposure... Company officials have said some of the oil came from tar sands in the western Canada province of Alberta.

How nice that we are being pressured to allow the Tar Sands pipeline to infiltrate even more areas of our lovely country.

With all that in mind, ta da! We have a brand new environmental tragedy to add to the list! Drill baby drill! USA! USA! Via The L.A. Times:

Enbridge, a beleaguered Canadian oil pipeline company, has spilled more than 50,000 gallons of light crude oil in rural Wisconsin --  shortly after the company said it had implemented safety reforms after a massive 2010 spill in Michigan. [...]

As you can see, Enbridge Inc. is a big Canadian oil supplier to the United States, and they say this latest screw-up has been contained. It came from a 24-inch pipeline that carries more than 300,000 barrels a day, and is Enbridge’s worst spill since the 2010 Michigan disaster.

"Enbridge is fast becoming to the Midwest what BP was to the Gulf of Mexico, posing troubling risks to the environment," [U.S. Rep. Ed Markey (D-Mass.)] said in a statement. [...]

According to Enbridge company data collected by the Polaris Institute, a Canadian think tank, Enbridge pipelines have spilled 804 times since 1999 and leaked 6.8 million gallons of oil. In response to a U.S. National Transportation Safety Board investigation blasting the company for its actions during the Michigan spill, the company said it had made “numerous enhancements” to safety procedures. [...]

National Response Center data shows that the new Enbridge spill in Wisconsin is the company’s worst in that state.

If their "enhancements" are anything like the BP "enhancements", fugetaboutit.

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Cartoon of the Day- Two Year Anniversary of Gulf Oil Disaster

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Via.

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