Archive for book booth

The Book Booth: Fourth of July Edition

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Image: From Mentalfloss via Flickr (credit bottom right of image)

The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. @SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore here, as well as a brick and mortar storefront mini-store in Hoquiam, WA at 706 Simpson Ave (Route 101 South). Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

The Book Booth: Fourth of July Edition

A Happy Fourth of July, dear readers. It's a great day to celebrate with fireworks and BBQs and all that. But it's also a good day to reflect that this nation was conceived on the concept that all men are created equal. And our history is the long road to try to achieve something like that.

Do you remember the Little Golden Books. In my early youth, my mother kept me well supplied, though I'm sure she got sick unto death of constantly reading me The Saggy, Baggy Elephant, surely a classic. MentalFloss has the history of these gems here.
Little Golden Elephant Books

Writers can find inspiration in many places. Recently author Stephen Jarvis, who's novel Death and Mr. Pickwick, shared the story behind the novel, which draws its story from the Dickens novel. And Brian Ferry. And other musicians. Ideas can seem to come from anywhere.
Where Do Ideas Come From?

We learned not too long ago that the Starz network has picked up Neil Gaiman's American Gods for a mini-series. Even better news for Gaiman fans is that the author will also be writing some of the episodes. Apparently he has written teleplays in the past for Dr. Who and Babylon 5, so he is no stranger to adaptation.
Neil Gaiman's Teleplays

Have some time on your hands this weekend? Then take the challenge! Can you guess the 100 most commonly used words in English? And do it in twelve minutes? You can give a try here.
How's Your Vocabulary?

Or you could spend your time more wisely by finding some new writers to read. The folks at Quartz have these recommendations of young Latin American writers who would be worth perusing. H/T to old friend George Carroll for the link.
Young Latin American Writers

Then there are those who use their time in more frivolous ways. Like F. Scott Fitzgerald, who conjugated the verb to cocktail for Blanche Knopf. And thanks to another pal, Diane Frederick, for sharing.
F.Scott Fitzgerald Conjugates 'To Cocktail'

Far from frivolous, these teachers at a middle school in Biloxi, Mississippi know how to spend their days off this summer. Take a look at how they transformed the hallway in one of the school buildings.
Biloxi, Mississippi Teachers Transform a School Hallway

Ken Bruen is no stranger to the noir novel. He has written many himself, featuring Jack Taylor. His latest novel is Green Hell. Here he lists his rather idiosyncratic top ten noir novels. Many of these, I don't know, but David Goodis was one heckuva writer and not read enough these days.
Top 10 Noir Novels (per David Goodis)

Many years ago, after having left her job as a sales rep for Penguin Books, Seattle Tammy was at loose ends. One day she received a phone call from the owner of Seattle Mystery Bookshop, Bill Farley, asking her if she wouldn't want to work the odd day and some hours at the shop located in Seattle's Pioneer Square. Tammy agreed and over the years, she eventually became the manager of the store. Bill was her mentor and her friend over these past years. Earlier this week, Bill passed away at age 83. We will miss him and thank him for his many generosities and friendship.
Bill Farley (of the Seattle Mystery Bookshop) Has Passed Away

Enjoy the holiday, Be Safe, and let us know what you have on the grill....and what books your reading this weekend.

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The Book Booth: The Sweetest Sounds Edition

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Image: Getty at 538.com

The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. @SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore here, as well as a brick and mortar storefront mini-store in Hoquiam, WA at 706 Simpson Ave (Route 101 South). Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

The Book Booth: The Sweetest Sounds Edition

Sunday marks the 113th birthday of one of the most dominant persons of the American musical stage during the 20th century, Richard Rodgers. Rodgers was very attuned to the world of books. He and his lyricist Lorenz Hart adapted John O'Hara stories for their production of Pal Joey. And nearly all of Rodgers collaborations with Oscar Hammerstein had sources in books, including Oklahoma and Carousel (both based on stage plays), South Pacific, The King and I, Flower Drum Song and The Sound of Music. So a big Happy Birthday to Richard Rodgers.

Rodgers did encounter stiff resistance to the song Carefully Taught in South Pacific; both he and Hammerstein were resolute in keeping the song in the show. But banning songs and books is still part of the anti-intellectual stream among some Americans. Interestingly, over at 538, they couldn't find what book was the most banned in America. The reasons why are explained here.
Banned Books in America

One of the victims last week in the Charleston shootings was librarian Cynthia Hurd. So it was fitting and fine that the Charleston County Council stepped up and renamed the library she worked at for her.
Librarian Cynthia Hurd, Charleston Shooting Victim

I've noted in previous posts the problems David Brooks had with the "facts" in his latest opus, The Road to Character. Other similar problems have shown up now in some other works, prompting Vulture.com to wonder when publishers will start using fact checkers. And it seems some are now.
It's High Time Publishers Used Fact Checkers!

The novelist Milan Kundera has recently published a novella, The Festival of Insignificance, which has received atrocious reviews. How do we deal with a bad book by a great writer? Colton Valentine tackles the question over at HuffPo.
When Good Writers Write Bad Books

Miguel de Cervantes, the author of Don Quixote, and father or the modern novel, lived a life full of romance and excitement. Yet his remains are buried underneath a Spanish convent. NPR explains how this came to be here.
Cervantes's Final Resting Place

Yes, opening lines are important. Marley was dead. Call Me Ishmael. We remember them, if we remember nothing else about the book. Buzzfeed has come up some fifty plus of the greatest of the opening lines in literature.
Opening Lines of Great Books

I guess it comes as no shock that Powells Bookstore in Oregon is regarded as one of the best. So no wonder, then, that the Guardian has listed it as THE best bookstore in the world! It certainly has quite the inventory. From OregonLive.
Powells: The Best Bookstore in the World

Literature can inspire other kinds of artists to new heights. The folks at QuirkBooks recently listed their favorite top ten love songs based on good books. I was happy to see Kate Bush's Wuthering Heights on that list, a song about as haunting and eerie as the novel itself.
10 Love Songs Based on Good Books

I leave you now to a great weekend, filled with books and reading. And with great music. Here from Richard Rodgers musical, ground-breaking for its time, No Strings with Diahann Carroll and Richard Kiley singing The Sweetest Sounds.

Also...from South Pacific...'You've Got to Be Carefully Taught'

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The Book Booth: Fathers Day Edition

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Image: via Bustle

The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. @SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore here, as well as a brick and mortar storefront mini-store in Hoquiam, WA at 706 Simpson Ave (Route 101 South). Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

The Book Booth: Fathers Day Edition

Happy Fathers Day to all you good dads out there. This year we have both Fathers Day and the summer solstice on the same day, which must mean something profound, though what that may be, escapes me. In any event, Happy Summer and do something fun with your ol' man.

I know I've indulged many a time, book vacations abroad. Which are totally great, if you happen to have the time and the money. But summer is also a great time to get outdoors and commune with nature. Bustle has some good recommendations, including Dharma Bums, to take along in your backpack.
Backpack Reading Worth Its Weight

Speaking of old Beats, NPR recently caught up with poet and bookseller, Lawrence Ferlinghetti. At age 96, he seems to be going strong, still writing and still generous with his time.
Interview with City Lights Publisher Owner Lawrence Ferlinghetti

A bit younger than Ferlinghetti, Anne Roiphe, only 79 years of age, has been writing novels for fifty years. Always a well-regarded author, her work has not received the attention it should. Here she reflects on what those many years of writing have taught her.
Anne Roiphe: Lessons From 50 Years of Writing

Summer movies! There are a ton of them, or at least so it seems to me. And many are based on books. This years batch include two classics, Far From the Madding Crowd and Madame Bovary, both of which have had previous adaptations. Honestly, I've never thought Bovary to be a particularly cinematic read, but I'd be happy to be proven wrong. HuffPo has a list of eleven summer film adaptations here.
Films Adapted from Books On Your Movie Screens This Summer

The latest installment of the Jurassic Park enterprise has already become this year's mega-hit at the box office, earning nearly a bazillion dollars so far. There are, as Sarah Brown at Quirk reminds us, other classic books about man's encounters with the big lizards, including Arthur Conan Doyle's other hero, Professor Challenger who ventured off to The Lost World. Sadly, she does not feature my favorite, Syd Hoff's magnificent Danny and the Dinosaur.
Dinosaurs As Fiction Heroes

Good news for Neil Gaiman fans from the Starz network. Gaiman's American Gods has been picked up for serialization and it sounds like it's a go. I wont be surprised to see other adaptations be realized now that Game of Thrones has taken the television world to new and illustrious heights.
American Gods to be Serialized on Starz

Alas, Gaiman's graphic novel, The Sandman, along with three other graphic novels, were the subject of one student's attempt to have them "eradicated" from the syllabus in an English class at Crafton Hills College in California. Perhaps this young woman would be happier at Bob Jones University or Liberty College, where I'm sure these books are not among the assigned readings.
College Says No to Censorship

I've tried to imagine the work that goes into the graphic novel. Obviously, there is a lot of work from inception to finished product. Jonathan Case is an artist and author of the new graphic novel The New Deal. He discussed the making of the book here for Publishers Weekly.
How Do You Make a Graphic Novel?

And then there is the terror of the blank page. Here are some authors who faced the demon of writers block. Some of these authors never really got over it.
The Demon of Writers Block

Please do enjoy your weekend with lots of books. Give your dad a hug and buy him lunch. And give him a book he'll love..

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The Book Booth: Happy Bloomsday Edition

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Image: from Bustle

The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. @SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore here, as well as a brick and mortar storefront mini-store in Hoquiam, WA at 706 Simpson Ave (Route 101 South). Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

The Book Booth: Happy Bloomsday Edition

Despite the fact that Google spellcheck doesn't like how I spelled Bloomsday, the anniversary of Leopold Bloom's trek around Dublin on June 16th 1904 is upon us. So grab yourself a gorgonzola sandwich, pour yourself a glass of burgundy and if you happen to be in Dublin, stop into Davy Byrne's pub to celebrate.  #Bloomsday

The summer season is fast approaching with the solstice but days ahead. With that in mind those of us lucky enough to live near large bodies of water can head out to the beach with lotions and books at hand. Bustle has these recommendations for good beach reading. I can't say I'm familiar with any of these titles, but then again, I'm old.
Beach Reading Suggestions

For those of us who'd prefer literary titles, MentalFloss collected these favorite books by well-known authors. Scroll past the Ayn Rand, whom they feature first as she wouldn't have known good literature from a hole in the ground. The rest of them are good. Who knew that Samuel Beckett loved Catcher in the Rye?
What Books Do (or Did) Famous Authors Recommend?

Then there are the stories about the glamorous and not so glamorous in Hollywood. Author Michael Friedman, whose novel Martian Dawn was recently republished, had these novels of Tinseltown on his personal list of the best over at Publishers Weekly. Of course both The Last Tycoon and Day of the Locust are must reads.
10 Best Tinseltown Novels

The New York Times Book Review recently had this short interview with Stephen King. Asked about some of his favorite non-fiction writers, I was pleased to see him name Rick Perlstein, author of some very fine modern American histories, Nixonland and The Invisible Bridge. And I was taken by his selection of Don Robertson as his numero uno novelist.
Stephen King's Favorite NonFiction Writers

You know what modern novels lack? A good duel. I'm sure there is plenty of fisticuffs in today's fiction, but no ten paces, turn around and fire stuff. So it's good to see James Guida at the New Yorker discuss the swashbuckling duels in literature.
Swashbucklers!

Not too long ago, I noted here that Kazuo Ishiguro had recently published a new novel, his first in years, The Buried Giant, and that it contained elements of fantasy. Apparently the book has stirred a bit of controversy among fantasy novel fans and brought out the issues of genre. So at The New Republic, Neil Gaiman and Ishiguro recently discussed the notion of genre and what it means for the literary writer.
What is 'Genre'?

In other book news, the successor to Charles Wright as US Poet Laureate was announced this week. He is the poet Juan Felipe Herrera, author of such collections as Half of the World in Light and Senegal Taxi. I salute the former UCLA Bruin and hope he enjoys his tenure.
New US Poet Laureate is Former UCLA Bruin!

Amazon.com is no stranger to legal probes and the behemoth gets some more scrutiny as European Union regulators will soon examine its dealings in e-readers. NPR reports here.
Amazon and the European Union Antitrust Probe

I know I can be fairly obsessive about books and so can my wife. But I guess I'd really start worrying if either of us displayed any of these symptoms of serious book collecting from this amusing list provided by the New Antiquarian.
How Are Serious Book Collectors Different From You and Me?

Have a splendid weekend my book loving friends and please let us know what books you are enjoying on an early summers day.

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