Archive for Bob Dole

Former GOP Sen. Bob Dole: Paul, Rubio, Cruz lack experience; Cruz "way out there."

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bob dole

eating their own

Former Republican Senator Bob Dole thinks Rafael "Ted" "Green Eggs and Ham" Cruz is "an extreme right wing guy" and "way out there." That's an understatement, but okay, we can let it slide just this once. Dole is 90, by the way, so he has a vast number of comparisons to draw from. Why, in HIS day...

And he's right. Recently, Elizabeth Warren quipped that Ted Cruz would have repealed the Declaration of Independence. And even more recently, Cruz said he'd use the confirmation of President Obama's new HHS Secretary to try to overturn Obamacare.

He's all yours, GOP.

The Hill, quoting from an interview Bob Dole had with The Wichita Eagle:

"A number of the younger members, first-termers like Rand Paul, Rubio and that extreme-right-wing guy, Ted Cruz — all running for president now. I don't think they've got enough experience yet," Dole said. [...]

Dole said Cruz is "way out there" on the extremes of the party and defended his own record, calling himself one of President Reagan's top supporters.

That was after Cruz said this:

Ted Cruz:

All of us remember President Dole, and President McCain and President Romney. Now, look, those are good men, they're decent men, but when you don't stand and draw a clear distinction, when you don't stand for principle, Democrats celebrate.

As Rick Perry would say, "Oops."

For more Cruz lunacy, just scroll through our posts here. As for Rand Paul, scroll here for his own brand of WTF.

Meanwhile, as a special bonus, let's talk Paul Ryan. The Black Caucus is challenging him on poverty after he said that poverty is caused largely by a "tailspin of culture," particularly in inner cities, where "generations of men [are] not even thinking about working or learning to value the culture of work."

And don't even get me started on Marco Rubio.

Note: Edited to correct errors.

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VIDEO-- Bob Dole: "Reagan couldn’t have made it" in today's GOP; party should be "closed for repairs."

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gop Dear America I don't care

chart filibuster cloture motions via fox thru 2012

Former Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-KS) was on Fox News Sunday saying what more and more people have been thinking for awhile now. The GOP has morphed into a bag of inbred mixed nuts who have O.D.'d on Filibusterol.

Rational types need not apply. In fact, they're becoming extinct.

Chris Wallace:

In your first two years as a Senator, there were 7 motions filed — cloture motions to end debate. In the last two years, there were 115 cloture motions. Is the filibuster being abused...?

Bob Dole:

No doubt about it.

Wallace:

What do you think of your party, the Republicans today?

 

Dole:

I think they ought to put a sign on the national committee doors that says “closed for repairs” until New Year’s Day next year — and spend that time going over ideas and positive agendas.

Wallace:

You describe the GOP of your generation as Eisenhower Republicans, moderate Republicans. Could people like you, even Ronald Reagan — could you make it in today’s Republican Party.

Dole:

I doubt it. Reagan couldn’t have made it. Certainly Nixon couldn’t have made it, 'cause he had ideas. We might have made it, but I doubt it. I mean... I just consider myself a Republican, none of this hyphenated stuff.

reagan obsolete

H/t: Think Progress

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Disability community shocked, hurt. Senate aide: "One of most shameful moments I've witnessed... utterly appalling."

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As I wrote yesterday, and as you can see in the video above, even Republican, 89-year-old disabled vet Bob Dole couldn’t sway 13 GOP senators to ratify U.N. disabilities treaty. And it was utterly shameful, a genuinely disgraceful episode. In fact, the outcome was so painful that it brought Lawrence O'Donnell to tears:

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Now it's becoming clearer than ever that Republicans don't value life at all, unless of course, they think they can squeeze votes from uninformed and gullible voters by saying they do. It's becoming clearer than ever that Republicans say one thing and do another. It's becoming clearer than ever that heartless far right hypocrites need to go.

As  Josh Rogin reports, the disability community was shocked and hurt:

David Morrissey, the executive director of the United State International Council on Disabilities, told The Cable in an interview that his group and many others had been assured by numerous GOP senators that they would vote in favor of ratification, but then disabilities groups were given no warning when those senators reversed themselves and voted "no." [...]

The scene both inside and just outside the Senate chamber Tuesday before and during the vote was heart-wrenching, several observers said. Wounded war veterans and other disabled people filled the gallery above the floor and the hallways outside the chamber, expecting to celebrate months of effort, only to have those hopes shattered as the roll call vote was read aloud.

"That was one of most shameful moments I've witnessed during my time in Washington," one longtime senior Senate aide said. "I thought it was utterly appalling."

"The reaction was one of emotional hurt. There was weeping in the gallery," said Morrissey, who added that disability groups will remember the GOP senators who torpedoed the treaty ratification effort and groups have labeled the 38 the "wall of shame."

As Morrissey went on to say, this is what happens when right wing crazies try to agitate home schoolers, "pro-lifers" [sic], and parents with disabled children.

Be proud, GOP. Have yourselves a merry little Christmas.

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Even Republican, 89-year-old disabled vet Bob Dole couldn't sway 13 GOP senators to ratify U.N. disabilities treaty

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(Brendan Smialowski, Getty Images)

Being a well-respected, wheelchair-bound, 89-year-old former Senate majority leader and former GOP presidential nominee still wasn't enough for Bob Dole to convince his fellow Republicans to support an initiative to extend the rights granted to Americans under the Americans with Disabilities Act to citizens of the world.

Wanna know who had more influence than Dole did? Conservative groups like the Heritage Foundation's advocacy arm, Heritage Action, and the Family Research Council, plus sympathetic, tenderhearted types like Glenn Beck and Rick Santorum. They got jittery over the idea of "U.N. overreach."

Or as I like to call it, good will.

Josh Rogin is reporting that Santorum's Patriot PAC sent out a fundraising e-mail shortly after the vote claiming credit for the defeat.

Here's what GOP Senator Kelly Ayotte, a supporter, said:

“Senate ratification of this treaty would reflect America’s leadership role in breaking down barriers for disabled individuals. It would take a step toward making it easier for disabled Americans to live and work overseas, without impinging on U.S. sovereignty or Congress’ authority to determine our disability laws. Veterans service groups are especially supportive of the treaty, which would help level the playing field for disabled veterans who are abroad.”

But Bob Dole couldn't get 13 Republicans to ratify the treaty. Per Roll Call, only seven "joined Democrats to back U.N. Convention on the Rights of Persons With Disabilities, which would have expanded rights to disabled people globally." Those seven were Ayotte, John Barrasso, Scott Brown, Susan Collins, Olympia J. Snowe, Richard G. Lugar, Lisa Murkowski, and John McCain.

There were a few cowards who could have made a difference, but chose not to:

Sen. Thad Cochran, R-Miss., changed his vote from a “yes” to a “no” after it was obvious the treaty would fall short of ratification. Cochran is up for re-election in 2014 and could face a primary challenge from his right.

The other self-serving members of the Wussy Four who were skittish about being primaried were Saxby Chambliss, Lindsey Graham, and Lamar Alexander.

Happy holidays! 'Tis the season! Goodwill toward men (and women)!

Disabled men and women around the world will be eternally grateful to these compassionate "Christian" "pro-lifers" who will now have to live with their decision to deny people everywhere a little common decency. Be proud, Republicans.

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Never go naked to a knife fight: Fair warning about S. Carolina, "too small for a republic & too large for an insane asylum."

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Welcome to South Carolina, Hilton Head, United States
This travel blog photo's source is TravelPod page: Journey to Hilton Head

A big thank you to Christopher Lamb for permission to post his work. Cross-posted at HuffPo here.

U.S. Sen. John McCain soundly defeated Texas Gov. George Bush in the Republican New Hampshire primary in January 2000 to become the frontrunner in the campaign to win the GOP's presidential nomination.

The Bush campaign knew it needed to win in South Carolina, the first primary in the South, to stop McCain. To do so, the Bush campaign stopped at nothing, running one of the ugliest campaigns in modern U.S. politics.

It used anonymous push polling to ask registered Republican voters if they would vote for McCain if they knew he had fathered an illegitimate black daughter. Fliers of McCain and his adopted Bangladeshi daughter were widely distributed. In addition, other push polls and fliers said that McCain's wife Cindy was a drug addict and that McCain, a decorated Vietnam veteran who spent years as a prisoner of war, was a traitor. Other accounts claimed that McCain was also a homosexual and/or mentally unstable.

To exacerbate things, McCain had promised that he wouldn't use attack ads in South Carolina. The statement, however well meaning, was self-defeating, violating the conventional wisdom that one should never go naked to a knife fight. Bush won the South Carolina primary and eventually the GOP nomination, serving two terms as president.

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney, who just won the New Hampshire primary, needs to keep in mind what happened to McCain in South Carolina or else he will find himself dazed and confused, and talking out of both sides of his mouth. Again.

To understand politics in South Carolina, one needs to be aware of the quote from the Unionist James Louis Petigru who responded to the state's decision to secede from the United States in December 1860 by saying, "South Carolina is too small for a republic and too large for an insane asylum."

Four years earlier, on March 22, 1856, Preston Brooks, a Congressman from South Carolina responded to an attack on slavery by U.S. Charles Sumner of Massachusetts by nearly beating him to death in the Senate chamber. The defenseless Sumner, whose legs were trapped under his desk, could not escape. It took three years for him to recover from his wounds. Brooks received a hero's welcome when he next returned to South Carolina.

Brooks' tactics were relatively subtle (though more physical) when compared with other South Carolina politicians such as John C. Calhoun, Wade Hampton, Pitchfork Ben Tillman, Cotton Ed Smith, or Strom Thurmond.

The Bush campaign's character assassination of John McCain in South Carolina in 2000 owed its inspiration to Lee Atwater, another South Carolinian, who served as George H.W. Bush's campaign director when he ran for president against Massachusetts Gov. Michael Dukakis in 1988. Atwater used racism as a wedge issue to smear Dukakis by trying to connect him to Willie Horton, a black man who had raped a white woman while on a prison furlough. Conservative columnist Robert Novak wrote that Atwater distributed unfounded claims that Dukakis had been treated for mental illness and that his wife, Kitty, had once burned an American flag.

Bush was easily elected president. Among Atwater's assistants on the campaign was Bush's son, George W. As reward for his part in the success, Atwater became chairman of the Republican National Committee. According to Time magazine and other media sources, Atwater, working with then House Minority Whip Newt Gingrich, circulated a memo that said Democratic Speaker of House Tom Foley was a homosexual.

"This is not politics," Republican Senate leader Bob Dole said in a speech on the Senate floor, "This is garbage."

In South Carolina, the two aren't mutually exclusive.

Christopher Lamb is a communication professor at the College of Charleston in Charleston, South Carolina, and the author of five books. His fifth, "The Sound and Fury of Sarah Palin," is forthcoming in February. If you would like to contribute as a citizen journalist to The Huffington Post's coverage of American politics, please contact us at www.offthebus.org

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