Archive for Economy

Thursday Nosh!

Share

marinated-mozarella-l

Given the #WeekendCocktailMoment, figured out a nosh nod we and a lot of stats out there on the importance of diet and nutrients.

Kabobs are always a hit of a party, and this version looks to follow in those footsteps.

Ingredients

3 (8-oz.) blocks mozzarella cheese
1 (8.5-oz.) jar sun-dried tomatoes, drained and halved
1/2 cup olive oil
3 tablespoons finely chopped fresh flat-leaf parsley
1 teaspoon garlic powder
1 teaspoon onion powder
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon Italian seasoning
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
Garnish: flat-leaf parsley sprigs or fresh rosemary stems

 

mozmarinate
Preparation

1. Cut blocks of cheese into 1-inch cubes. Arrange cheese cubes and tomato halves in an 8-inch square baking dish.
2. Whisk together 1/2 cup olive oil, chopped parsley, and next 6 ingredients; pour evenly over cheese cubes. Cover and chill at least 8 hours or up to 24 hours. Transfer mixture to a serving plate. Garnish with fresh flat-leaf parsley sprigs, or spear tomato halves and cheese cubes with short rosemary stems, if desired. Drizzle with marinade, if desired.

 

tommozzaskewers

Share

What's the Matter with America?

Share

Nicole Sandler

 

As evidenced by the events unfolding in Ferguson, MO over the past 10 days, there's a lot wrong with America. Some of the problems are within the president's authority to fix. Thomas Frank  joined me in the last half-hour of today's show to talk about the three he outlined in his latest piece at Salon, "How to Wreck the GOP in 3 Easy Steps."

Of course, his suggestions would only wreck the GOP's chances of taking over the Senate in November, and bolster the Democrats', and make the country better for those of us struggling to get through each month.

This action by President Obama would also probably help to quell the unrest in Ferguson, MO and fend off similar future demonstrations of frustration and anger that will undoubtedly pop up around the nation. But as long as the needs of hurting citizens are ignored, the more we'll see people taking to the streets.

Attorney General Eric Holder is headed to Ferguson today. This morning, his open letter to the citizens of that town appeared in the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Although he sounded some of the right notes, he also proved to be as tone-deaf as MO Gov. Jay Nixon with proclamations like this:

In order to begin the healing process, however, we must first see an end to the acts of violence in the streets of Ferguson.

There's a reason the chant "No Justice, No Peace" has resonated so clearly with so many. He's got it backwards..

I began the show today by reading that letter, then recounting my own horrible experience with law enforcement both recently and a few years ago when I was not only arrested for trying to ask my then-congressman a question at an event that was supposed to be a "town hall meeting," then being sprayed with pepper foam while in the custody of the Broward County jail.

I told that story again because of an Op-Ed published in yesterday's Washington Post, written by Sunil Dutta, identified as "a professor of homeland security at Colorado Tech University, has been an officer with the Los Angeles Police Department for 17 years."

Aside from the sickening realizion that "homeland security" is a course of study at at least one American university, the content of Mr. Dutta's editorial underscored the need to revisit the "authority" granted to those who wear badges and carry guns.

It begins benignly enough

A teenager is fatally shot by a police officer; the police are accused of being bloodthirsty, trigger-happy murderers; riots erupt. This, we are led to believe, is the way of things in America. It is also a terrible calumny (a false and slanderous statement.) ; cops are not murderers. No officer goes out in the field wishing to shoot anyone, armed or unarmed. And while they’re unlikely to defend it quite as loudly during a time of national angst like this one, people who work in law enforcement know they are legally vested with the authority to detain suspects — an authority that must sometimes be enforced. Regardless of what happened with Mike Brown, in the overwhelming majority of cases it is not the cops, but the people they stop, who can prevent detentions from turning into tragedies.

But then descends into a state of power crazed madness

Even though it might sound harsh and impolitic, here is the bottom line: if you don’t want to get shot, tased, pepper-sprayed, struck with a baton or thrown to the ground, just do what I tell you. Don’t argue with me, don’t call me names, don’t tell me that I can’t stop you, don’t say I’m a racist pig, don’t threaten that you’ll sue me and take away my badge. Don’t scream at me that you pay my salary, and don’t even think of aggressively walking towards me. Most field stops are complete in minutes. How difficult is it to cooperate for that long?

...

But if you believe (or know) that the cop stopping you is violating your rights or is acting like a bully, I guarantee that the situation will not become easier if you show your anger and resentment. Worse, initiating a physical confrontation is a sure recipe for getting hurt. Police are legally permitted to use deadly force when they assess a serious threat to their or someone else’s life. Save your anger for later, and channel it appropriately. Do what the officer tells you to and it will end safely for both of you. We have a justice system in which you are presumed innocent; if a cop can do his or her job unmolested, that system can run its course. Later, you can ask for a supervisor, lodge a complaint or contact civil rights organizations if you believe your rights were violated. Feel free to sue the police! Just don’t challenge a cop during a stop.

As I learned the hard way, innocent citizens who are brutalized by power drunk megalomaniacs often have no recourse. I didn't.

Susie Madrak, managing editor of Crooks & Liars, joins me every Wednesday morning. Today, she sent along a video that every manly man should watch. It's a great lesson to authority figures everywhere who might wield some modicum of power to show how to use it in a positive way.

And finally, a big "You Go Girl" to Mo'ne Davis, the first girl ever to pitch a shut out in the Little League World Series. She takes the mound again tonight.

I'll be drinking lots of fluids and downing some chicken soup today in a quest to rid myself of this summer cold and will be back tomorrow with author Sasha Abramsky and Congressman Alan Grayson, Radio or Not!

Share

Unrest Revs up in Ferguson - On Day Ten

Share

 

ferg2

Chris Hayes of All In has been johnny on the spot for several days in Ferguson, including a period where he and colleague Craig Melvin had some goodly-sized rocks hurled at them late last night - msnbc ran live courage into the wee hours.

Seriously?

ferguson8:18

I live on peaceful ground in Vermont, so it's been a matter of total cognitive dissonance to see Baghdad nightsbloom darkly in Missouri. Then this.

Yesterday, hopes were high for a Missouri demilitarized and headed back to normal. All day optimism rose … then dark fell. The Breaking News banners got virtually stuck in place from Ed Schultz and Reverend Al Sharpton, then Chris Hayes and Craig Melvin had excellent footage from Ferguson into the 2-3 a.m. hour.

handsup

 

From messnbc:

 


We are SO much a better country than this siege in Missouri indicates to the rest of the globe.
From The Kansas City Star:

FERGUSON, MO. Anger and frustration over the shooting death of an unarmed black teenager by a police officer has been expressed through prayer vigils and peaceful protests throughout this St. Louis suburb.

During the daytime.

When the sun goes down, violence has reigned. Some fine commentary at msnbc.

It did not last. As Trymaine Lee, Amanda Sakuma, et al  reported for msnbc.

Ferguson was once again confronted with "violence and chaos" overnight.

Police fired tear gas at protesters amid the sound of explosions, shots rang out and armored police trucks sped down Florissant Avenue. At least two people, both males, were shot "in the dark of night," Capt. Ron Johnson of the Missouri State Highway Patrol said at a press conference. Two guns and a Molotov cocktail were confiscated. There were two fires, one at a local business and another at an unoccupied residence, Johnson said. Police were hit with bottles and rocks. Thirty-one people had been arrested by 2 a.m. CT.

Johnson said police did not fire any bullets at protesters, whom he encouraged to turn out for demonstrations during the day.


police3

"There is a dangerous dynamic in the night," Johnson said, noting that the criminal activity overnight "came from a tiny minority of law-breakers."

Among those arrested last night were Getty Images photographer Scott Olson -- the latest in a series of journalists detained by police -- who was released soon after. As Rachel noted on the show, it was another "rough night" for so many in and around Ferguson, including the First Amendment.

In a pattern that has played out night after night since 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed Aug. 9 by Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, nonviolent gatherings are followed by looting and riots, tear gas and rubber bullets and dozens of arrests.

Chris Hayes and Craig Melvin got on the wrong end of some large thrown objects, the best bit of reaction was Hayes saying: "They're Angry, angry people, man!"

 

 

Attorney Eric Holder heads to Ferguson tomorrow, to lead an effort of down-simmering in accordance with the Federal and state goals of regaining order and justice in Missouri.

mace

FERGUSON, MO.
Anger and frustration over the shooting death of an unarmed black teenager by a police officer has been expressed through prayer vigils and peaceful protests throughout this St. Louis suburb.

During the daytime.

When the sun goes down, violence has reigned.

In a pattern that has played out night after night since 18-year-old Michael Brown was shot and killed Aug. 9 by Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, nonviolent gatherings are followed by looting and riots, tear gas and rubber bullets and dozens of arrests.

Maddow's coverage was superb. Natch. She goes straight for the journalistic jugular.

 

ferguson-fri

Share

Peace and Justice in Ferguson, Very Elusive, says Rev. Al Sharpton

Share
Image, Reuters

Image, Reuters

The Reverend Al Sharpton had plenty of things to say about Ferguson, police brutality,  from the NYDailyNews:

One shot, in critical condition as Ferguson, Mo., cops crack down on protesters, arrest seven for breaking curfew

A group of citizens refused to comply with Gov. Jay Nixon's midnight curfew and broke into a restaurant. Police responded by throwing smoke and tear gas to get them to comply. A man was shot and a police car was the target of another shooter as the tensions continued to escalate.

Photo courtesy JamesKeivom, New York Daily

Americans don't enjoy curfews, never have … but when your town looks like a bad day in Baghdad, tempers will flare and burn for some time. From Melissa Harris-Perry:

What is it going to take  to reform the country back to decent common gun sense? I don't see a whole lot of smiling going on after a night of curfews, militarized police/federal investigators and shooting victims - one death.

Back to MHP:

A turn of events was made possible by the decision of the White House and Eric Holder to order a Federal Examination of Michael Brown's corpse.

police brutality in Atlantic City

Brown's family had been asking for a thorough autopsy, looking for justice and truth. And kept calling the West Wing for an assist.

Some more perspective from the Rev. Al:

Sharpton also took the opportunity to rail against Police Commissioner Bill Bratton’s “broken windows” approach to policing, which critics say unfairly targets minorities.

“There is a connection” between Brown and Garner, he said. “Both of them were victims of this aggressive policing of alleged low-level crime. There ain't no difference between dealing with looseys and dealing with telling kids to get out of the street.”

police-brutality_o_2244271

Share