Hobby Lobby Ruling Opens Doors For Satanists To Strike Down Anti-Abortion Laws


Sunshine Behind Cloud

My father used to say, "There's nary an ill wind that doesn't blow some good." Pretty smart guy, my pop.

While everyone on the right is cheering the SCOTUS Hobby Lobby finding and looking for more religiously restrictive ways to use it, there're some others who are seeing a bright lining to this dark cloud. Those people are the Satanists.

Okay, most of you think those who worship Satan march to a much different drummer than the rest of us. Sure they do. But they have a right to their beliefs and the Hobby Lobby decision is a religious-based determination. And Satanism, despite how little or much you know about it, fits the description of a bona-fide religion.

Now comes the interesting part. The Satanists are making an argument, based on the Supreme Court's finding, that some anti-abortion laws are forcing a state's religious belief on them and therefore need not be followed. The Raw Story:

According to the Guttmacher Institute, 35 states currently have informed consent laws, and of those, 33 require that the woman be told the gestational age of the fetus.

In some states, that information consists of pro-life propaganda that links abortion to a higher incidence of breast and ovarian cancers, or discusses “post-abortion syndrome,” a mental condition not recognized by any major medical or psychiatric organization.

Regardless of your personal religious beliefs, you can see the argument here that science is being misused, misconstrued or misinterpreted to serve a "right wing, religious" view. There has been no consensus on abortion leading to higher rates of breast or ovarian cancer or "post-abortion syndrome." Truthfully, postpartum depression is a real and acknowledged clinical psychosis and that's generally, by definition, after a child has been carried to term.

Because the Satanic Temple bases its belief “regarding personal health…on the best scientific understanding of the world, regardless of the religious or political beliefs of others,” it claims that state-mandated information with no basis in scientific fact violates its religious beliefs.

Now I get to use a favorite word -- ergo -- this makes forcing a woman to read informed consent laws unconstitutional. At least in the 35 states that require it.

Hobby Lobby and the Satanists could be a blessing in disguise, or as my pop would say, the good that the ill wind kicked up.

  • bpollen

    I never imagined I would say it, but in this instance, GO SATAN!