Poll-itics: SCOTUS approvals near lowest "in 14-year trend"


poll-itics smaller SCOTUS

SCOTUS, SCOTUS, SCOTUS, what are we going to do with you? Well, here's an idea: Elect Progressive presidents who will replace right wing extremist Supreme Court justices (and other judges) who decide cases that are turning this country upside down.

This Supreme Court has:

  • ruled in favor of prayers in city council meetings (read: Christian prayers);
  • eliminated buffer zones around abortion and contraception medical centers in Massachusetts so that women can now be intimidated and threatened literally within an inch of their lives;
  • weakened unions by ruling that they could not force home-care workers to join them and pay dues;
  • and, of course, allowed Hobby Lobby and other family-owned businesses to decide what kind of birth control their employees could use based on their bosses' religious beliefs. Not the workers' beliefs, mind you, because apparently, corporate religion trumps that of the individual.

And don't get me started on Citizens United and McCutcheon decisions allowing corporate money to attempt to buy elections the way Willard "Mitt" Romney buys car elevators.

According to Gallup, this has affected the court's popularity. Democrats in particular are not too thrilled with this SCOTUS. If that's the case, you know what to do: Vote. In droves. Swarm the polls. Help to register other voters and get them to the ballot box, too.

gallup scotus


Americans remain divided in their assessments of the U.S. Supreme Court, with 47% approving of the job it is doing, and 46% disapproving. These ratings are consistent with approval last September, when 46% approved and 45% disapproved, and rank among the lowest approval ratings for the court in Gallup's 14-year trend. [...]

Republican approval of the Supreme Court is up 21 percentage points since last September, from 30% in 2013 to 51%. Independents' approval shows little change, going from 47% to 46%. Support among Democrats, on the other hand, is down [...]

Americans' current views more closely reflect the court's own ideological divisions in these two recent decisions, rather than its bipartisan unanimity.

  • http://thepoliticalcarnival.net/ GottaLaff

    In order to do that, I imagine we need people in Congress and the WH to move on it. Hence....GOTV.

  • worddiva

    Actually, the way to deal with SCOTUS is to first realize that the institution itself needs to change. Then, enact major reforms. 1) End life tenure for justices 2) Expand the number of justices (constitutional courts in other countries have up to 15 members) 3) change the appointment process to make it less political (an independent commission perhaps) 4) make the constitutional amendment process less burdensome (made sense when we had 13 states; less so with 50). Yes, I know this requires the uphill task of uprooting what the venerated Founders put in place, but if we want a country that looks more like the 21st century, rather than the 18th, it's gotta be done.