Anti-immigrant letter: "Our land is full. The invitation wasn't for forever."


misspelled amnesty sign anti-immigrant

Undocumented immigrants are not "illegals." They are people. Unfortunately, all too many other anti-immigrant "people" don't treat them as fellow human beings. They treat them as though they were diseased animals (and have even used that word to describe them), or worse. It sickens me, and it should sicken you.

Ironically, it was GW Bush who signed law protecting young migrants, but, hey... #BlameObama. Ironically squared: Those who demand an English-only America can't spell worth beans. See image above.

The Los Angeles Times letters to the editor included a couple from anti-immigrant writers that I ordinarily wouldn't share with you, but they got under my skin, so here they are. I added my two cents, because, as I always say, our voices matter. First, though, there's a letter that makes sense. The next two, not so much:

There's irony in the descendants of Europeans in North America, which was stolen from natives who had been here for centuries, reacting angrily to "immigrants" moving north. These native North Americans are coming back to their land.

Renee Veale, Pasadena


Two letter writers urge "compassion" for the illegal immigrants flooding our borders and condemn the protesters in Murrieta. I have a challenge for both of them. ("Murrieta's anti-immigrant protesters could learn something from Lady Liberty," Letters, July 3)

My daughter is a single working mom raising my granddaughter. They live in a rented condo in Costa Mesa. Money is tight for them.

I ask each of these compassionate letter writers to send me their addresses. I will go check out their residences, and if they are better than my daughter's, I will have my granddaughter break in so she can have a better life using their homes and amenities.

I am sure people imploring us to be compassionate will jump at the chance to show my daughter compassion.

John C. Vita, Huntington Beach

One: Um, Mr. Vita (an Italian name, I take it?), they're not "illegal immigrants." They're people. Do you refer to Nixon as an "illegal president"?

Two: Did your daughter get raped and/or abused on her way to her residence? I sincerely hope not.

Three: And this concludes another episode of "Really Bad Analogies!" (h/t: The Stephanie Miller Show) brought to you by John C. Vita of Huntington Beach.


More than a century ago, when America needed labor to build its cities and farmers to till its soil, the Statue of Liberty raised its lamp to encourage ambitious, creative, eager, industrious immigrants to come to our shores. Emma Lazarus wrote a noble invitation to these immigrants, a poem that one letter writer quoted extensively.

The invitation was not and is not the law of the land.

The immigrants came. Our land is full. The invitation wasn't for forever.

Our country cannot support the wretched refuse of every country of every continent in perpetuity, and neither Lazarus nor Statue of Liberty sculptor Frederic Auguste Bartholdi intended for that to happen.

Ermanno Signorelli, Mar Vista Crest

"Wreched refuse," Mr. Signorelli (an Italian name, I take it?)? Somehow I don't think Emma Lazarus meant to imply that immigrants are people that this country doesn't accept. In fact, including the words "wretched refuse," "she saw a way to express her empathy for these refugees." By suggesting the opposite (after all, you didn't put her words in quotes), that struggling human beings are contemptible, repulsive, sleazy trash, you took on the very traits you attributed to those you hate.

"Our country cannot support the wretched refuse of every country..." But some countries are acceptable? Just not the ones in which brown people reside. AmIright?

"Our land is full." Only when it comes to intolerance and exclusion, Ermanno. Sadly, the U.S. has way more than enough of those. Your letter proves that.

"When America needed labor..." Psst! Ermanno! We still do. Some of our finest were born in other countries.

"Encourage ambitious, creative, eager, industrious immigrants to come to our shores..." We do. And how do you tell the unambitious, uncreative, uneager, unindustrious ones from the others? Doesn't every person have the potential to be successful? And if someone is less ambitious or creative or successful, does that disqualify them somehow? How many lazy, untalented, passive Americans do you know? I've met quite a few. Should we deport them?

"The invitation wasn't forever." Someone please direct me to the "give me your tired, your poor" expiration date. The Statue of Liberty seems to have torched it.

statue of liberty give me your tired your poor

  • GottaLaff

    Standing O!

  • NefariousNewt

    I assume Mr. Signorelli works for the Dept. of Immigration and Naturalization, when he claims "our land is full," since last I checked, we were still handing out gobs of H-1B visas to try and import highly-skilled technical labor from places like India and China. But please: do not let reality get in the way of a good story!

    The fact is, population growth in America is stagnant, the average age of the population is shifting, and the available workforce for manual labor is shrinking as more and more younger people try to get into higher technology jobs and spurn "rough" work. That vacuum, as it was in the late 1800's and early 1900's, is being filled by the next wave of cheap immigrant labor, and let's see Messers Signorelli & Vita get California or Arizona or Texas to simply "re-export" their undocumented throngs. What they fail to recognize, realize, or accept, is that these people have been woven into the fabric of America now and to excise them will rend this nation from coast to coast.

    Who will mow lawns, plant flowers, pick fruit and vegetables, take care of children, and wash dishes when the undocumented are expelled en masse? Will our correspondents step up to fill the millions of vacant positions? Will their children, or their children's children? Ah, but we all know the answer: that kind of work is "beneath" them!

    The only things wretched about the people streaming into our nation from Central and South America are: 1) the conditions under which they've had to live in their home nations and 2) the reception they've received from a self-righteous, hypocritical, and selfish group of Americans who think everything they have was granted to them by God by dint of their labor and no one else's. These pathetic excuses for Americans don't even know their own civics, the history of their own nation, well enough to mount more than a feeble-minded, frothing attack, basted in ignorance. Those people hurling epithets as busloads of scared & lonely children are the basest form of citizen, and should be shunned for their idiocy.