Poll-itics: Number of liberals surge in U.S.

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Liberal-Definition

chart liberals surge in poll v conservatives

Liberals rock. I say that because it's true, and of course, because I am one. I own it. I scream it proudly. I embrace it. So there.

Yet to some, "liberals" is a bad word, a label and association they don't want, because conservatives turned it into a dirty word. Until recently, that is.

For some time, "progressives" was the euphemism many on the left decided to go with. I tend to use the words interchangeably, but apparently they have different meanings. What the heck, I'm a liberal progressive. Or a progressive liberal. Or a liberal liberal, or a progressive progressive.

Shying away from the word "liberal" is a mistake, because liberals are responsible for so many positive changes in this country. For example, here are a few things liberals have done for us:

  • The GI Bill
  • Endangered Species Act
  • Environmental Laws
  • The Space Program
  • The Peace Corps
  • Americorps
  • The Civil Rights Movement
  • Earned Income Tax Credit
  • Family & Medical Leave Act
  • Consumer Product Safety Commission
  • Americans With Disabilities Act
  • Freedom of Information Act
  • Women's right to control their reproductive future
  • Allowing citizens to view their own credit records
  • The Internet

And that's just for starters. Just link over for more.

Apparently, Americans are starting to see the light. Per the Los Angeles Times, the nation is leaning to the left:

Self-professed conservatives have long outnumbered liberals in America, but the gap has narrowed significantly in the last four years, particularly on social issues, a shift that could harm GOP prospects in future elections.

On social issues, the number of people who identify themselves as liberal is now almost equal to the share who say they are conservative, according to the latest polling by Gallup. For years, conservatives held an advantage.

It must be a Marxist Kenyan French gay thing. Or a failed GOP "outreach" thing. Remember that? I bet Republicans would like us to forget:

Republican strategists already worry about the gap separating the party from black, Latino and Asian American voters, and an ideological gap would add to their burden.

The Times goes on to say that, when it comes to economic issues, the trend is similar, "although the conservative advantage remains bigger in that realm."

We liberals will have to work on that realm. Meantime, as the old Magic 8 Ball says:

magic 8 ball outlook good smaller

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