Paul Broun (STFU-Ga) says Jesus will tell him where to go. So will we.

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atheist barbie v Paul Broun

Politico posted an interesting remark by Paul Broun (STFU-Ga), the wingiest of wingnuts from Georgia who just lost a primary election bid for a seat in the U.S. Senate. Did I say "interesting"? I meant grating.

Rep. Jack Kingston and businessman David Perdue will duke it out in a run-off. Then the winner will oppose Democrat Michelle Nunn in the general election.

What's that? You're not familiar with Paul Broun (scroll)? Allow me:

Both Kingston and Perdue are going after Broun for an endorsement. Gee, who wouldn't want someone as level-headed and rational as Broun vouching for him? In fact, Kingston wanted one up close and personal, requesting to "sit down and talk" to him. Here's what Paul Broun had to say about that:

Broun is willing to talk, but he’s not sure at the moment if he’ll endorse either candidate.

“I will sit down and talk with them,” Broun said Thursday. “I’m just trying to figure out right now where my lord Jesus Christ wants me to go and what he wants me to do.”

Which grated on me. Severely. Between Michele Bachmann hearing voices in her head directly from the Invisible Blue-Eyed White Man in the Sky, to Sarah Palin's confusing Roger Ailes with her god, to Herman Cain, Rick Santorum, and Rick Perry (among others) exploiting their version of god in their campaigns, and, well, don't even get me started on Mike HuckaPreach-- my atheist head is spinning.

Religion has no place in politics. The separation of church and state has been increasingly ignored in recent years, which is not only a threat to our crumbling democracy, it's offensive, and not just to me: Saying "prayers in the name of Jesus Christ before luncheons" made attendee "squirm."

That was in response to the Supreme Court decision finding that sectarian prayers in public meetings are constitutional.

Our public officials are supposed to represent everyone, not just those who believe what they believe. Religious discrimination, aggression, or exclusion are not what the Founding Fathers had in mind.

That aside, I personally find it annoying, disturbing, and/or obnoxious (depending on the circumstances) when politicians force their religion on an entire populace, gush faux Christisms as they hypocritically refuse to treat others as equals and with compassion, and publicly express their reliance on imaginary beings instead of good judgment, experience, and reason.

Enough with the holier than thou self-righteous b.s. Believe what you want to believe, but respect the rest of us enough to do so privately:

The Lord's Prayer:

"When you pray, you are not to be like the hypocrites; for they love to stand and pray in the synagogues and on the street corners so that they may be seen by men. Truly I say to you, they have their reward in full. 6"But you, when you pray, go into your inner room, close your door and pray to your Father who is in secret, and your Father who sees what is done in secret will reward you. 7"And when you are praying, do not use meaningless repetition as the Gentiles do, for they suppose that they will be heard for their many words.…

separation of church and state Jefferson

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  • Eykis

    At least that will be one imbecile out of the US House; possibly two when Michelle Nunn tosses Kingston!