The Book Booth: Veterans Day Edition

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veteransday

The Book Booth is a weekly feature at The Political Carnival, relating news, notes, and reflections from the world of books and publishing. SeattleDan, along with his wife, SeattleTammy, are operators of both an on-line bookstore, as well a brick and mortar in small town Washington State. Both have been in the book business since shortly after the Creation, or close to 6000 years now.

Monday we salute those folk who have defended our country in battle and I hope you will take a moment to reflect on their deeds. And hope there will be a day when no one will have to serve in battle to preserve our freedoms.

In the meantime, Amazon has proffered a peace offering to Indie Bookstores. The Gray Lady had the story here. And it met, by and large, with great hilarity from booksellers. Melville House has collected many responses and they are amusing to go through. I'd say don't plan to go to your local independent bookstore and expect to see Amazon product on the shelf.

Considering it is a three-day weekend for many of us, do make plans to visit that local Indie. Buzzfeed has the many reasons why you'll be glad you did.

While you're out shopping and stimulating your local economy, check for these cool bookcases. This is via Paddy, who really, really wants this. So be a pal, buy it and send it to her.

However, this guy doesn't need your assistance in procuring a bookcase. He who may or may not ever pay taxes has enough money to get his own.

I have a couple of items this week in the Books as Art Department. First, it seems that in Birmingham, England, old books are not tossed away. They are transformed into things of beauty.

And if that were not enough,MentalFloss has these beautiful sculpture made, of course, from books.

I am not recommending that, while on your weekend travels, you drop into your local tattoo parlor. But if you insist on decorating your body, you might want to consider some of these designs from literature.

I grew up reading comic books. I preferred DC superhero comics as Marvel Comics hadn't really taken off when I was at that age. But I also devoured the Classics Illustrated editions as well, most of which actually followed the plot lines of the novels that were adapted. So I welcome the emergence of the graphic novel. ABEBooks has a fine list (and a mini-review of Maus) of fifty graphic books.

One of our finest American novelists is Robert Stone. I highly recommend his novels, Dog Soldiers and A Flag for Sunrise. Or almost anything he's written. So it is exciting to learn he has a new novel being published this month, Death of a Black-Haired Girl. Publishers Weekly has this interview with him here.

Finally, now that 60 Minutes has recanted its story about Benghazi Benghazi Benghazi!!! and with the celebration this past week of Guy Fawkes Day in Merrie Olde England, I leave you with this quiz from the Guardian on conspiracies in literature. I only got five right, so I'm going to have to read or re-read some of these books.

Have a fine weekend and let us know what is atop your stack of books.

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  • Dan Domike

    Thanks for the recommend, Mark. I think Kevin Bacon is an under-rated actor and this one does sound great. And by all means, check out Robert Stone.

  • Dan Domike

    Dennis Lehane, if you haven't read him, is great, Paddy.

  • Paddy

    Okay, I've caught up with all the Michael Connollys, Robert Crais, Harlan Coban, Lee Child and a couple others I can't remember right now. Any other thriller/detective series I should give a look see? And yes, I'm making up for lost time.

  • Paddy

    I heard incredible things about that movie, but I'm just not emotionally able to deal with such sadness right now.

  • Mark MacKay

    Thanks for a great read and your cool links. I will be stealing and retweeting some and will investigate Robert Stone. I saw the movie "Taking Chance" this morning. Kevin Bacon stars as a Marine escorting a young Marine's remains home after he was killed in Iraq. It's a very quiet film and shows Bacon's interactions with strangers along the 8-day trip to the young Marine's home. After watching it for about ten minutes I started to tear up and felt that way throughout the film. There's not any chest thumping or bible thumping in the film. Bacon's character is reviewing his life while on this journey and simple gestures from strangers generate some profound feelings.