Texas is blue-ming

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BLUEm bloom

Previously I posted a quickie that's worth a read: Three things that Texas needs to become a blue state (betcha Rick Perry can only name 2 of them). Here's the sequel.

Dear Democrats,

One word of advice: Persistence.

Love,

Laffy

Via the Los Angeles Times:

But after a generation's worth of Democratic failure, many are convinced the state is on the cusp of competitiveness, thanks to the rapid growth of Texas' minority population, especially Latinos, and a slow rebuilding of the party from the ground level — city, county, legislative offices — up.

"It's inevitable," said Matt Angle, a Democratic consultant [...]

Among those drawn by the prospect are some of the data-driven strategists of President Obama's campaigns, whose targeting and mobilization boosted black and Latino turnout and twice helped win such battlegrounds as Ohio, Virginia, Colorado and Nevada. They have dispatched field teams throughout the state, hoping to apply their organizing techniques to Texas, where millions of eligible minority voters have either failed to register or haven't bothered voting.

Three other words of advice: Turnout, turnout, turnout.

Bluing up Texas will take years, of course, but it didn't hurt to have the wonderful State Senator Wendy Davis filibuster the GOP's egregious proposals intruding upon women's privacy, bodies, and reproductive rights. She was the right kind of person who brought the right kind of attention to the wrong kind of legislation.

The Asian American population, though much smaller than that for whites or Latinos, is growing even faster.

If these citizens, many of them new voters, are registered and cast ballotstwo big ifs — Democrats are convinced they will transform Texas politics.

Of course, Republican-run states have made it tougher to register and cast ballots. Want to vote? Democrats need not apply.

Steve Munisteri, the Democratic party's state chairman, said, "No one's going to vote for you if they think you don't like them, even if they agree with you." And the GOP has made it crystal clear that they don't like people who don't look, sound, and think exactly as they do. Or who have vaginas.

Unfortunately, Democrats don't have anyone exciting "on the bench," meaning, few, if any, viable statewide candidates. We hear a lot about San Antonio's mayor Julian Castro and his twin brother, Joaquin, a congress member who pops up on the Tee Vee Machine a lot these days. However, neither seem interested in running for higher office, per the Times.

And then there's Wendy Davis, who hasn't ruled out a run for governor. She also hasn't ruled out the extreme difficulty of such an undertaking.

As I've written over and over again, and as the Times confirms, building Democratic strength by getting candidates into office from the bottom up (school boards, city councils, etc.) is the way to go. Meanwhile, Texas is and will turn bluer. But it won't happen quickly or easily.

Persistence.

Turnout.

Please.

chart texas blue gop v dem

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