"The average food stamp benefit is a little more than $4 a day, about what one pays for a latte at Starbucks."

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inequality income

Today's Los Angeles Times letter to the editor, because our voices matter:

Re "The case for food stamps," Opinion, May 24

The proposed reductions to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (also known as food stamps) are more evidence of the inequality between rich and poor in the United States. There are some 50 million Americans who are "food insecure," including roughly 17 million children, according to the charity Feeding America.

The cuts are more than an economic misstep — they are a moral failing.

The average food stamp benefit is a little more than $4 a day, about what one pays for a latte at Starbucks. We are a country of enormous wealth that would deny nutrition to the least affluent, even though studies tell us that hunger denies children the ability to learn at a time when an educated citizenry is essential in a global economy.

Our Constitution was adopted specifically, in part, to "promote the general welfare." Enacting these cuts would mock the idea of mutual obligations in a free and just society.

Barbara H. Bergen

Los Angeles

will work for latte

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