"Margaret Thatcher, Milk Snatcher" / The Wicked Witch is Dead

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare

thatchersunglasses

Margaret Thatcher may be a hero to Quitter Sarah, who couldn't make it through even one term as Governor of Alaska with its 731,499 people, but she was no hero to millions of her fellow countrymen and countrywomen, at least of whom (if the accounts are true) danced in the streets upon hearing of her death. Apparently 'The Wicked Witch is Dead' is a major iTunes hit at the moment I read earlier today.

This account of life in Margaret Thatcher's Britain by someone who actually lived there when she was prime minister mentions Thatcher's decision to stop the school lunch program, something she apparently was very proud of, hence the name 'Milk Snatcher'.

From the 'Red Molucca' blogpost: "Tramp the Dirt Down"

The old saw that one shouldn’t speak ill of the recently dead cannot possibly apply to controversial figures in public life. It certainly didn’t apply to President Hugo Chavez who predeceased Margaret Thatcher amidst a blizzard of abuse.

The main reason it must not preclude entering the lists amidst a wave of hagiographic sycophantic tosh of the kind that has engulfed Britain these last hours is that otherwise the hagiographers will have the field to themselves.

Every controversial divisive deadly thing that Thatcher did will be placed in soft focus, bathed in a rose-coloured light, and provide a first draft of history that will be, simply, wrong.

More here:

FacebookTwitterRedditDiggStumbleUponTumblrLinkedInPinterestEmailShare
  • H J Hill

    There's another story about Thatcher when Secretary of State for Education.

    She received a letter from a female mature student who was studying part-time for a qualification and was receiving no state support whatsoever, unlike full-time students. Thatcher replied, defending the status quo and mentioned that when she was studying part-time to be a barrister, she too received no state support.

    However, in her letter, Thatcher omitted to mention that she was married to the multi-millionaire Dennis Thatcher at that time.